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the side of the house farthest from the parallel lines. Beyond that again was kitchen. This is the mode of ingress the open bay, flecked with while by the and egress of which the world mostly north-easter, and the great fapping avails itself — the front door being re- brown sails of Devonshire trawlers served for gentry, beggars, and “for- lying at anchor off the harbor mouth. eigners" generally.

Now and then a jackdaw few from his post among the chimneys, and hovered

over a heap of offal in a corner. Pied Now one winter afternoon, Mrs. wagtails fought and chippered along Tonkin was in the kitchen“ beating"

"the roofs, and gulls traced complicated - mending vels, that is – while her curves and reticulatious against the friendly lodger sat by the fireside, sky. keeping her company and filling the It was market day ; and a continuous netting-needles' with twine as she re- stream of womankind - young in gay quired them.

The men - Peter the hats and dresses, approximating more father, and Jimmy the son — lately or less to the latest fashions, old in home from sea, were in the loft mend- bonnels and gowns of more sober stuff ing the belly of the Petrel's trawl. and cut — flowed past the window, Outside, on the Green, and by the bound for an afternoon and evening of railings of the harbor wall, some mingled business and pleasure in the twenty or thirty fishermen were idling. streets of the neighboring town. Mrs. Some leaned over the low railings, Toukin was in hier element. She had doubled up into impossible postures ; fastened her net by a loop to a nail in the rest were performing a maneuvre the frame of the little window aforecurious to behold. They were in little mentioned, so that she could observe groups of five or six, huddled together and comment at her ease without hinconfusedly, chin on shoulder, as men drance to her work. With her fingers might stand in a crowd. But instead busy about the net, she kept an easy of standing still, they were walking up flow of commingled criticism, anecand down with little short steps, four dote, and moral reflection, while the or five paces each way, jostling, shuf- lodger listened and wondered. fling, treading on one another's heels “Theer's Patience Ann James, gwine every time they turned. Sometimes he to market in her shawl, athout a bonwho held the ear of a group would net, ef I d’live ! Well, I sh'd be reach an impressive point in his argu- 'sha-amed! Sarah Tregurtha

a hard ment at the critical moment; and then, woman — d' keep a shop out 'long instead of turning with the rest, he – d’gie long credit, and then, when would walk backwards in front of them, you're as bare o' money as a toad is of fugleman-wise, gazing earnestly into feathers, 'tes, ‘ Down wi' your cash' their faces, and beating his palm with wi' she, 'or the law shall make 'ee," au emphatic finger. Now and then a They do say there's ill wishes flyen market-cart came clattering along the about Sarah's ears. I wouldn' be she, street at break-neck speed, the driver not for a thousand pound and a satin standing with legs wide apart (your gownd. Better a blow downright 'ap Cornish Jehu disdains to sit); and then a wish ’at d' come like a thief in the the conferences were seen to break up, night, and you caan't tell how nor and the groups scatter wildly ; while when. Look at poor Martha Trier, mothers rushed screaming from their lives down to quay. They do say Job doors and snatched unconscious infants Trier, afore 'a marr’d Martha, went from the brink of destruction, and a courten another maid, and they fell chorus of objurgations from all sides out, and Job wouldn'ba' nawthen to pursued the retreating vehicle.

do wi’ she, but marrd Martha, heing Over the harbor wall there was a his cousin. So the other maid wished glimpse of the still, blue pool, and the agen Martha — wished her all manner boats riding in it, drawn up in long'o' things. And Martha's two sons

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were born big-headed (witless] and women !” exclaimed Mr. Tonkin, big-headed they've growed up." thrusting a red face in at the door.,

The lodger, though not unaccus- " They be’old the nose of a conger, and tomed to hear similar tales, found this they cry “Say-sarpent !' to wance. А one too much for him, with its ghastly chap caan't breathe in this town athout inference. He ventured to protest. breaking haalf the commandments ef “Well, 'at's what they d' say,” Mrs. you hark to what the women d' say."

1 Tonkin replied, with her usual cautious Well, 'tes well known that when formula in reference to things super- you're converted you mustn' sing songs natural ; " 'at's what they d' say, and nor whistle, as ef you were a' ordinary 'at's what Martha herself d' b’lieve, as Christian, so to spake,” said Mrs. Tonshe's tauld me often."

kin. “I wonder she doesn't retaliate," “Hauld tongue ! the lad's all right. said the lodger.

You d' knaw how 'les. Your heart * Plaize ?"

may put off ets evil and be chucked “Hasn't she tried to pay the woman full o' holiness, long afore your lips back in her own coin ?”

do forget their wicked ways. Jimmy I don't doubt et. I don't doubt Green's thoughts edu' whistlen, you she's done her best, poor dear; but ’a may be sure - only the mouth of ’en. be a poor wake crater - couldn' for the So don't 'ee go taking away his char'clife of 'en wish agen a soul strong ter.” So saying, Mr. Tonkin disap'nough to raise a wart on the finger of peared abruptly. 'en. Poor soul, when her second was “I edn'," said Mrs. Tonkin. “I born, and the doctor tauld her 'twould edn’; but 'a should be more careful. surely be like the first, a' wouldn' Ef 'a was whistlen athout manen etb'lieve en. "No,' she'd say, 'the and I don't say 'a wadn'- et mayn't Lord wouldn' let her '

the be no harm to spake of, simminly ; but other one-o'a wouldn' let her go so 'tes a sign o' the wakevess o' the flesh. fur ; I'm sure 'a wouldn'; nor she “There d' go young Benny Dick.” wouldn' be so hard on me as to wish The lodger, though foreseeing that et,' said Martha. And she did go the witticism would be wasted on Mrs. about for a long time, tellen us o' the Tonkin, could not refrain from asking clever things the poor chield did, and if Benny Dick was a married man. how 'a was sure the wits of en was “Ess, to be sure,” she replied ; "a sprouten — ay, 'twas a long time afore married man, poor chap - marr'd last she give up hope, poor dear beauty !

year
marr'd a woman from

- ; " Eh-h! there's them maids o' Long thought to do a clever thing, the fullish Sam's in new gowns, as smart as pay- crater. Down here, sir, we don't like cocks, gwine out to catch the chaps. our people to marr' out o' the town; That's along o' Sam's luck wi’ the fish and these folk are worse 'an most forthis winter. There'll be a thousand eigners a passel o' roguish, redherring on aich o' them maids' backs, haired Danes. Why ded 'ee marr' I've no doubt.

'en ?' said one to Benny. Why,' said " There d' go young Jimmy Green, Benny, “I'll tell 'ee. You'd kpaw, whistlen. Why, Peter 1” — calling to said he, how yon people do stutter, her husband outside. “Peter, I say !” every man Jack of 'em' (and that's so,

“Well there, what es 't ?" came you caan't hardly make out what they from behind the door.

d' say). Well,' said Benny, 'I had “Wadn’ Jimmy Green converted up to marr' somebody, and I wanted a chap'l last revival ? "

peaceful home, and I thoft a wife with “Ess, sure.”

a 'pediment in her spache 'ud be just “Well, 'a 've just gone in 'long, the thing. So I went and picked out whistlen like a heathen. Edn' back-the maid 'at stuttered worst o' the slidden, is he?"

whole bunch,' said Benny. Well, week "Now, ef that edn' just like the after they were marr'd, Benny thought

manen

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to try her. 'A waited till Sal’day come, seasons, without necessity, and apparand she'd claned the floor, and then 'a ently from sheer delight in the act. come up from the boat with his say. They are reluctant to quit a neighbor's boots on, all mud aud muck and wet house without carrying off some spoil laaken, and 'a marched into the kitchen, or other ; if the fryiug-pan they come and stands there afore the fire as bauld to claim is in use, or has already been as ye plaize. Presently she come down lent, then a pinch of saffron, a spoonauver steers, and 'twas as good as a ful of yeast, or last week's newspaper play to see her stand theer scaulden will serve their need just as well. Sevaud profanen somethen dreadful, I've eral of them are in the habit of spongno doubt, inwardly, but not a word ing regularly on Mrs. Tonkin, coming could she coax through her teeth. daily and seldom going empty away. Benny, he laughed, thinken he's mas- She submits with great good-humor, ter now, sure 'nough, when down she regarding it as a neighborly duty, and falls in a fit. They runned for the doc- merely contenting herself, when the tor. Doctor took Benny aside. "Take raiders have departed, with shaking care how you d' anger your wife,' said her head and remarking that “they he. "You see,' said the doctor, óspache that go a-borrowing go a-sorrowing.” to a woman is like the hole in the top Then she is reputed to spend less of a pol— lets off the steam when 'a do time than any living woman in “coozbile up; but stop the hole, and there's ing," or gadding about on gossiping a' accident. I waan't say more 'an tours. Naturally, visitors are more this,' said he, et may be as bad as frequent at a house where the mistress murder ef you d'anger your wife ; so is actually as often to be found at home take care.' And ever sence then, the as not. Moreover, when one of the poor chap caan't call his soul his own.” newsmongers -- and there are twenty

dames in the village who benevolently

give up their whole time to the busiBREAKING off the report of Mrs. ness, resolutely sacrificing their own Tonkiu's discourse at this remarkable trivial household affairs to the good of anecdote, a pause is made to explain the community – wlien one of these that even the brief specimen just given has a special bit of information to cirwas not without its interruptions. It culate - a death, a ghost, a pretty scanis seldom indeed that the kitchen re- dal, or what not — she will not have mains empty of visitors for ten minutes been half an hour about it before she at a time least of all on market day, reflects : when all the world is abroad. Various ". There's that poor Mrs. Tonkin ; reasons contribute to make it one of she never do g'out-s'ch a workish the chief places of resort in the village, woman as 'a es ; 'twill be a kindness to ranking equal at least with the grocer's go tell her to wance." shop, the bakehouse, and the " short” Then, if you remember that Mrs. or well. Its central position has some- Tonkin is second cousin at least to half thing to do with this. Then its mis- the village, and that every relation tress is generally popular, as a sensible, passing the door is by duty bound to good-tempered woman, with a large look in and chat; if to relations, borfund of available sympathy for friends rowers, and newsmongers, you add her in trouble, a good listener, a good immediate neighbors, who are in and talker, and, above all, one of whom it out of the house all day, as well as has been said that no woman is easier people on business and casual visitors to borrow fron). The habit of borrow- from other villages, you will begin to ing, like the kindred habit of running realize to what a formidable length a into debt, has a peculiar fascinatiou for bare list of her daily callers would exthese irresponsible folk; and in some tend. To chronicle in detail all the cases it develops into a positive mania, visits of the afternoon would be tediits victims borrowing at all times and 'ous ; it will suffice to select two or three

III.

of the most remarkable as specimens, for 'a mostly gets a dolly or a mug up and pass over the rest in silence or Plymouth for 'en. And John he with briefest mention.

looked up, and stroked her hair, and

said, “Just a fine cargo o torn nets and IV.

twenty pounds worth o’ debts, my dear. ONE of the earliest visitors was Mrs. Edn' that brave ?' said he. Well, I Tonkin's next door neighbor and spe- wadn’ what you may canll joyful, you cial crony, Mary Ann Matthews, a tall, may be sure, but with he that bitter grey-haired woman with a worn, sweet 'twouldn' never do for me to gie in ; so face and a soft, pleasing voice. She said I, “Never mind, Annie, my dear ; wore her shawl over a peaked cloth da's brought hisself home safe and cap, and had her knitting in her hands. sound, so us waan't mind the nets, nor The two women exchanged greetings yet the debts,' said I.” in the peculiar recitative which is used “Sure, right 'nough !” said Mrs. in salutation and in question and an- Tonkin, with a world of sympathy in swer, and gives the most commonplace her voice. “Nets nor yet debts," she talk the charm of music. In fact, it is repeated, approving sentiment and jina musical phrase, sung rather than gle alike. “'Tes queer how the luck spoken, beginning on a low note, rising do run. Et do come and go like wind a fifth to the emphatic word, and then and tide. Some do swim in 't - some dropping by semi-tones.

don't never get a taste of ’nt." Well my dear, edn’ gwine market “ John did try to get Lucky Harry on then ?"

our boat laast season," said Mrs. Mat“No, Mrs. Tonkin, my dear. Mais- thews; "offered 'en haalf captain's ter's just come home from Plymouth. share if 'a would come ; but ’a said no You edn’ gwine neither ?"

- said 'a wouldn' sail with a captain “No ; must finish this plaguy old net whose hair was red — doubted ef his ef I d' live. What ded 'ee fit for den-luck ’ud hauld in that case. And I'm ner to-day, Mrs. Mattheys ?

sure my John edu' what you may caall "Oh, just cabb’ge soup and ling and red-haired azackly — yally, I caall ’nt.” tates. What was yours ?

“ You're right, my dear," said Mrs. "Oh, hadn' time to fit nawthen Tonkin, with conviction ; “yally 'a es proper. Us just had “Sat’day's denner - just the color of oranges, and that's - catch 'em and take 'en,' as they d' a lovely color. But as for Lucky say - a bit here and a bit there. So Harry, I wouldn'ha' nawthen to do John Mattheys is back?"

wi' en, ef I was cap'en. Luck like his “Ess, 'a b’lieve come back this edn’ nat’ral — not in a great rogue like morning."

he. I d' waut to knaw where et do “ Any luck wi' the fish ?”

come from and what price 'a do pay for “No. Not a herring all the while

’nt." terr'ble bad luck. 'A should ha' come " Well," said Mrs. Matthews, lowerback full three weeks ago; but you d'ing her voice, “they do say somethen knaw how 'tes ; crew say, ' Let's stop about a great tall man in black, people on a bit longer - may be the luck'll see round Harry's door after dark. turn ; ' and so they stop and run the But 'tes all nonsense, 'a b’lieve,” she debts up till salesman waan't lend an- added, glancing towards the lodger. other farthing, and back they come “So 'a es, ny dear,” assented Mrs. worse off 'an they did start. Poor Tonkin reassuringly. “But I waan't John ; I knawed bow 'twas, minute I set never have 'en on my boat. 'Tes well eyes on 'm.

Wet laaken and tumblen known how they that d''ave 'en do tired 'a was ; and ’a never said a word, pay for ’nt after. Running after luck but just dropped in a cheer and sat. edn’ the way to catch 'en. Look at And little Annie, she runned up and Betty Trevean ; ef a woman could be jumped ou his knee, and said, 'What'st lucky by trying, 'twould be she. Why, brought home for ma and me, da ?' - ''twas only laast week she comed in

LIVING AGE. VOL. VI. 274

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here and axed to borry my bottle o’ “Caan't a chap never touch pipe giant cement I use to mendie dishes [periphrasis for resting] for a bit in aud cups wi'. • What have 'ee scat, this house?” was Mr. Tonkin's plainBetty ?' said I. 'Edn’ scat nawthen, tive query. said she. · Then wherefore com'st “ Touch pipe indeed! Simmin to thou a-borryen ?' said I. 'I'll tell 'ee,' me, you don't never do nawthen else.” said she. "When I come down this “ These women !” said Mr. Topmornen,' said Betty, 'I found a snail kin in a stage aside to the lodger. on my windy.' "'At's a good thing,' “ They're a puzzle! Caan't liv a man said I - thinken upon the saying –

be and let 'n do his work in his own

way at his own season !" The house is blest

66 Work !” from Mrs. Tonkin in Where snail do rest.

white-hot scorn. Ess, a good thing,' said Betty, ef “ Ess, work! What do the women 'twill only stay here. But I only had know o' work. What's your work to one wance afore,' said she, “and then ours? I'd like to see a crew o' women 'a dedn’ stop time 'nought to let the draw a net on a bad night. A hard

ck soak in, so to spake. Now,' said life, sir, we d' 'ave and our wives do Betty to me, 'I was thinken this time their best to make et harder." I'd make my luck sartin sure ; so I'm “ Tcha!” exclaimed his wife, whose gwine to take this here cement, and contempt had passed beyond the stage cement the baste down to the windy when it could be expressed in words. glass. Crater's as well theer as any- Mr. Tonkin, who rather prides him. wheres,' said she ; 'et waan't do 'en no self on his eloquence, now drew himharm — save 'en maybe from being self up and embarked on an oratorical squashed. 'Tes for et's own good and effort. mine too,' said Betty. • Mind what

- a hard life, and a poor trade you're a-doen of,' said I; "tes the – the meanest trade there is ; our toil's first time I've heerd tell o’ making that bitter, et do take the sweetness your luck stick wi' cement, and I don't out o’the bread we earn thereby. We think 'twill serve,' said I. And sure d' 'ave wind and say for mates, and 'nough,” concluded Mrs. Tonkin in- they're like beasts in a cage, and lie pressively, “that very night the cat and wait for a chance to turn and rend got into Betty Treveau's spence, broke us, as the sayen is. Ess, we do snatch three dishes, and ate up Betty's Sun- every morsel of our bread out o the day mate."

jaws of death, 'a b’lieve. I tell 'ee,

sir, I've lived on the say and by the V.

say all my life, but I hate the sight of HERE the door swung open, and Mr. | ’nt and I hate the sound of ’nt. Ef I Tonkin entered from the loft, bringing could go inland, that's where I'd like with him a strong odor of Stockholm to live, sir — 'mong the trees, where tar. Keeping his eyes fixed on an im- nawthen 'ud meet my sight but trees aginary point some miles off through and green herbs. Out o sight and the wall, he rolled across the room with hearing o'the say forever and everthe true fisherman's gait - which is that's where I'd like to be." the sailor's gait differentiated into Mr. Tonkin's rhetoric, though rude, lumpishness by constant wearing of was really quite impressive, the lodger heavy sea boots — and brought to, six thought ; all the more so for its broken inches from the bars of the grate. delivery. But it had no effect on his With his arrival Mrs. Tonkin put off wife. her humanity and became a wife. “Well,” she said, “I like to taste

“Hullo !” she exclaimed sharply. the salt in the air I d' breathe, same as “You edn’ finished mending that in the vittles I d'ate. And I don't trawl, I'm sure. Go back to thy work, think much o' country folk. And I thou sluggard, go !”

don't think much o’people ’at grumule

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