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List of Presents for the Orphanage.-PROVISIONS:-Sack of Flour, Mr. Russell; 120 Eggs, Janet Ward.

CLOTHING :-50 Flannel Shirts, the Misses Dransfield.

Mr. Lawrence, 5s.; Mr. Gardener, per Mr. Ponsford, 20s.; Collecting Card, Charles Plant, 3s.

College Buildings.

Statement of Receipts from July 20th to August 19th, 1873.

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Further Contributions Received by H. Ryland Browne towards College Buildings.

Per Rev. T. Tarn, Peckham :

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THE

SWORD AND THE TROWEL.

OCTOBER, 1873.

Harlan Page; or, Personal Work for Jesus.

AN INTRODUCTION, BY C. H. SPURGEON.

UR venerable friend, Cornelius Elven, of Bury St. Edmund's, Suffolk, has finished his long and honourable career as a preacher of the gospel, and has gone to his reward. We were requested by a dear friend to "weave a chaplet" for his memory, but having few or no materials, we have been unable to do so; both heart and hand are willing, but the facts which, like amaranthine flowers, should fashion the immortelle, are not at hand, so that affection cannot perform its task. Our departed friend was a prophet honoured in his own country, for he exercised his useful ministry in his native town, and in the place wherein he was born devout men carried him to his burial, and made great lamentation over him. When we had just commenced our youthful pastorate at Waterbeach, Cornelius Elven, as a man of mark in that region, was requested to preach the anniversary sermons in our little thatched meetinghouse, and right well we remember his hearty compliance with our request. We met him at the station as he alighted from a thirdclass carriage, which he had selected in order to put the friends to the least possible expense for his travelling. His bulk was stupendous, and one soon saw that his heart was as large as his body. He gave us much sage and holy advice during his visit, advice which came to us with much the same weight as Paul's words came to Timothy. He bade us study hard, and mind and keep abreast of the foremost Christians in our little church; "for," said he, "if these men, either in their knowledge of Scripture, or their power to edify the people, once outstrip

you, the temptation will arise among them to be dissatisfied with your ministry, and, however good they are, they will feel their superiority, and others will perceive it too, and then your place in the church will become very difficult to hold." We felt the common sense of the observation, and the spur was useful. The sermons of the day were homely, very homely in style, and pre-eminently practical. We remember his reading the narrative of Naaman the Syrian, and his pithy comments thereon; but one thing above all others fixed itself upon our memory, and when we heard of the good man's departure it came before us with great vividness; he told us anecdotes of the usefulness of addressing individuals one by one about their souls, and urged the duty upon us with great earnestness, quoting again and again from the life of a certain HARLAN PAGE. From that day to this, being busy with a thousand matters, we have never looked up the biography which he so strongly recommended; but though it must be now some three and twenty years ago since we heard the sermon, our first thought, when we learned of the death of Cornelius Elven, was HARLAN PAGE. We sent at once for the little book, and it has refreshed us greatly to read it; and as we wish every reader of The Sword and the Trowel to know all about HARLAN PAGE, we take this early opportunity of advising them to get the little book from the Religious Tract Society. Perhaps many of our friends will smile and reply, "We read the book years ago," and our answer will be, “Then read it again." Our own belief is that a book which is popular with one generation is often forgotten by the next, and that it is a good thing to bring it again under notice. We do not know of a more stimulating work for the common run of Christians, or one more likely to be of lasting service to them; and therefore with more than common earnestness we press its perusal upon all who value our judgment.

Mr. Harlan Page was an American mechanic of very ordinary abilities, who laid himself out to win souls for Jesus by personal conversations and by writing letters to individuals. His success was great, and, though he was no preacher, his power for good far exceeded that of most ministers. He lived only to lead sinners to Jesus, and probably brought himself to an early but honourable grave by the zeal which burned within his soul, and quite consumed him. He was no orator, but he knew how to pray and prevail. To gather children into the Sabbath-schools, to speak to wayfarers, to importune the careless, and encourage seekers-these were his daily occupations in every instant that he could spare from his workshop. One of his first efforts was to give away little cards, upon which he had printed striking words of warning to the impenitent, and his last office was in connection with the Tract Society of New York, which was happy enough to secure his priceless services. His whole biography is full of pleasing incidents of usefulness, but we have thought it best, instead of attempting to abridge the whole, to give our readers parts of a chapter of the work, which may be regarded as a summary of the whole; and having thus introduced Harlan Page, we will let his actions speak for themselves.

"It may not be unimportant to bring together some of the characteristics of his efforts to honour Christ in the salvation of individuals

as illustrated in the preceding history. It was the burden of his heart, and the purpose of his life. When engaged in his usual business, the religious welfare of persons, with whose state he had become acquainted, was generally pressing on his mind; and it is now known, that for several years before he died, he almost always had by him a memorandum of the names and residences of a few individuals with whom he was to converse. On these he would call, as he went to and from his office, or religious meetings; and if no names were on his list, he felt that he was doing little good. He also uniformly had in his hat some awakening tracts, that he might present as he should judge them adapted to the state of those he met. Not unfrequently he would seize a few moments from his usual occupation, to go out and address some individual; and when the business of the day was closed, he hastened to some meeting or other religious engagement for the evening. It is believed that an entire month has frequently elapsed, during which he did not sit down for an hour, even in the bosom of his own family, to relax his mind, or rest. Every evidence of good accomplished gave him new joy; and every opening for usefulness added a new impulse to his efforts. He felt that, under God, the eternal joy or woe of immortal souls depended on his fidelity. Each evening and each hour brought its duties, which he felt could not be neglected or postponed. The present duty was still before him; and though "faint" he was still "pursuing." His labours on the Sabbath were not less exhausting than on other days, and he doubtless thus failed of obtaining that "compensation for toil" which the animal constitution requires, and which is essential to a long life.

When urged, at the close of a day of fatigue, to spare himself and spend the evening at home, he would say, "Don't attempt to persuade me away from duty. I have motive enough within myself to tempt me to enjoy repose with my family; but that will not save souls." A little previous to his last sickness, as he returned from church, coughing, he was asked if he had not spoken too much in the Sabbath-school "Perhaps I have," he replied, "but how could I help it, when all eyes were fixed, and the children seemed to devour every word I said?"

It was not uncommon, at different periods of his life, for him in sleep to imagine himself addressing the impenitent, and to wake in a high state of excitement and in tears, occasioned by the deep sympathy he felt for their perishing condition. It is also known, that, when he saw no manifestations of the outpouring of the Holy Spirit, he would be at times in deep distress, would wrestle more abundantly in prayer, renew his efforts to arouse Christians to duty, and awaken the impenitent; and, more or less, conversions were almost always the result. In short, it was not the great object of his spiritual life himself to be happy in religion, but rather by persevering labours and holy selfdenial-like the apostle who testified that he died daily-to glorify God in winning souls to him. He ardently desired to devote the whole undivided efforts of his life to this work, and nothing but the duty of providing for the support of his family prevented it.

He had the most clear view of the necessity to every man of being born again. As soon as an individual came into his presence it seemed to be the first question of his mind, "Is this a friend or an enemy of

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