Lincoln's Devotional

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Macmillan, 1995 M05 15 - 224 páginas
The depth of Abraham Lincoln's religious faith is much debated. He was wary of joining a church and is not seen as an outwardly religious man; yet he is famous to us for phrases and attitudes ringing with biblical cadences: "Four-score and seven years ago", "A house divided against itself cannot stand", "Let us judge not, that we be not judged". Lincoln had internalized the music and the morality of the Bible. He is known to have owned several books concerned with religion, and among them is this pocket-sized collection of Scriptures, originally titled The Believer's Daily Treasure. Possibly a gift from Mary Lincoln in return for a large family Bible Lincoln had given her, the book was originally published in London in 1852; it is unknown whether he carried the book with him, but it is for certain that he inscribed his name in it, a gesture he made sparingly toward his books. The Believer's Daily Treasure contains a piece of Scripture for each day; following each day's Scripture there is a poem mirroring the biblical lesson in verse. Reprinted in its entirety, this book is Lincoln's own devotional.
 

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Contenido

JANUARY
1
Evidences of the Believer
17
MARCH
32
Duties of the BelieverPersonal
48

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Acerca del autor (1995)

The son of Swedish immigrants, Sandburg was born in Galesburg, Illinois. At age 13 he left school to roam the Midwest; he remained on the road for six years, working as a day laborer. Sandburg served in the Spanish-American War and then, from 1898 to 1902, attended Lombard College in Galesburg. After college, he went to Milwaukee, where he worked as a journalist; he also married Lillian Steichen there in 1908. During World War I, he served as a foreign correspondent in Stockholm; after the war he returned to Chicago and continued to write about America, especially the common people. Sandburg's first poems to gain wide recognition appeared in Poetry magazine in 1914. Two years later he published his Chicago Poems (1916), and Cornhuskers appeared in 1918. Meanwhile, Sandburg set out to become an authority on Abraham Lincoln (see Vol. 3). His exhaustive biography of the president, which took many years to complete, appeared as Abraham Lincoln: The Prairie Years (2 vols., 1926) and Abraham Lincoln: The War Years (4 vols., 1939), which won a Pulitzer Prize. Sandburg's poetry is untraditional in form. Drawing on Whitman as well as the imagists, its rhymeless and unmetered cadences reflect Midwestern speech, and its diction ranges from strong rhetoric to easygoing slang. Although he often wrote about the uncouth, the muscular, and the primitive, there was a pity and loving kindness that was a primary motive for his poetry. At Sandburg's death, Mark Van Doren, Archibald MacLeish, and President Lyndon Johnson delivered eulogies. In his tribute, President Johnson said that "Carl Sandburg was more than the voice of America, more than the poet of its strength and genius. He was America. . . . He gave us the truest and most enduring vision of our own greatness." The N.Y. Times described Sandburg as "poet, newspaper man, historian, wandering minstrel, collector of folk songs, spinner of tales for children, [whose] place in American letters is not easily categorized. But it is a niche that he has made uniquely his own." Sandburg was the labor laureate of the United States. Sandburg received the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 1951 for his Complete Poems (1950). Among his many other awards were the gold medal for history and biography (1952) from the American Academy of Arts and Letters; the Poetry Society of America's gold medal (1953) for distinguished achievement; and the Boston Arts Festival Award (1955) in recognition of "continuous meritorious contribution to the art of American poetry." In 1959 he traveled under the auspices of the Department of State to the U.S. Trade Fair in Moscow, and to Stockholm, Paris, and London. In 1960 he received a citation from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce as a great living American for the "significant and lasting contribution which he has made to American literature.

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