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Observations on the Rules and Regulations.

3d Rule.-The TREASURER of a School Association should always be one of the principals or teachers of the seminary. The SECRETARY should be one of the scholars; and in this appointment, the master (or mistress) should be consulted:-temper and character, as well as ability, should distinguish the individual selected.

4th Rule. The day and hour of the committee-meeting should be such as do not interfere with the duties of the members, who should endeavour to meet punctually, and to give their undivided attention to the business. At every committee-meeting, the treasurer presides to preserve order. When the secretary calls for the Reports, the collectors, beginning with No. 1., present their books (see Specimen), and pay over the money to the treasurer, while the secretary examines the additions in the book. When all have been presented, the secretary reports the amount of each, and the total sum received. The treasurer then reports any payment made to the Auxiliary (or Branch) Society (or Association) since the last meeting; after which, any claims for Bibles and Testaments are received, and the stock in hand (if any) is reported by the secretary.

5th Rule.-In School Associations, the collectors should be approved by the master (or mistress) before they are furnished with books and in all juvenile societies, they should be selected with caution. The entry of every sum should be made at the time it is received, and the collecting book be neatly and correctly kept.

6th Rule.-In Sunday Schools, and other Associations of poor children, the rate at which Bibles and Testaments shall be delivered may be fixed by the committee. In many instances it may be desirable to deliver them when half the cost-price has been paid, and in some few cases gratuitously; but this should be done only after strict personal investigation.

7th Rule. The treasurer should receive an acknowledgment for all payments to the Auxiliary (or Branch) Society, and submit it to the next meeting of the committee: and the secretary should present the account of any Bibles and Testaments received.

8th Rule. In School Associations, the Annual Meeting may be advantageously held immediately before the vacation. The children should be allowed to take home their books, (which should be carefully preserved and returned,) and any papers relative to the society; by which means an interest in the object may be materially promoted and extended.

10th Rule. The "Extracts of Correspondence" should circulate among the members, and be lent to their friends and acquaintance. Nothing is more likely to confirm their attachment to the society, than the perusal of these important and interesting documents. The number required will depend on the extent of the Association.

Collecting Book.-Minute Book.-Proceedings at a Committee Meeting.

SECTION III.

MODE OF KEEPING THE ACCOUNTS.

In all the Specimens referred to or contained in this Section, the entries in Italics are to be considered as Manuscript.

The following Books are recommended for Juvenile Bible Associations:

1. THE COLLECTING BOOK.

As this book, with which every Collector is furnished by the Secretary, is precisely similar to the Specimen No. 2 of the "Collecting Book" used in Ladies' Bible Associations, it is only necessary to refer the reader to Chap. VII. Section V., where every requisite information will be obtained.

2. MINUTE BOOK.

This is a thin quarto book, and is kept by the Secretary. The names of the Committee should be inserted on the first page, with blanks opposite to each notifying their attendance, as described in the Specimen of the "Fair Minute Book," Chap. II. Section V. The Rules of the Association should next be inserted; and then the Minutes of every Committee Meeting in succession. The following Specimen of the Minutes of a Committee Meeting will sufficiently illustrate this part of the subject:

At the Sixth Meeting of the Committee, held on the 13th of April 1820:

PRESENT:

Mrs. A. B. in the Chair,

and those Ladies who are marked as present in the list.

56. The Minutes of the last meeting having been read and confirmed, the Treasurer reported that she had paid to the Cash Secretary of the Auxiliary Society, since the last meeting, the sum of 87. 10s., for which an acknowledgment was now produced, and marked No. 2 by the Secretary. Also, that the total amount paid to the Auxiliary Society since the establishment was 217. 15s.

57. The Secretary reported, that she had received from the Depositary of the Auxiliary Bible Society, since the last meeting, two Brevier and three Nonpareil Bibles, and three Pica and two Pocket Testaments, amounting to 21. 5s.; and that the total amount of Bibles and Testaments received from the Auxiliary Society since the establishment is 4l. 7s. 10d.

If the Minutes be numbered progressively throughout the book, it will save considerable time and trouble in referring to any particular subject. The first Minute of the Seventh Committee Meeting will thus be numbered, " 60."

Specimen of Proceedings at a Committee Meeting.

58. The Reports having been called for from the Collectors, the following sums were paid in :—

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which said sum of 61. 16s. 3d. was paid over to the Treasurer.

59. The following copies of the holy scriptures were delivered: viz. To the Collector No. 4, a Nonpareil Bible, for the supply of Mary Smith, a little girl of ten years of age, who has paid up the cost-price. This interesting child had been long very anxious for a Bible; but her parents, who are honest but extremely poor cottagers, were unable to afford the money. Mary often brought the Collector sixpence at a time, and once brought a shilling. On being asked how she had obtained so much, it appeared that she rose every morning by five o'clock, in order to collect violets and other early spring flowers, which she made up in bunches and sold in the market. This was her own spontaneous act, suggested by her earnest desire to obtain a Bible, which will be doubly valuable as the reward of her early industry.

To the Collector No. 7, a Pica Testament for the supply of John Simpson, a little orphan boy, who has paid up more than half the cost-price. He earned the money by going on errands; he is supported by the parish; and the Collector has very properly refused to take more from him, as he now wishes to lay by all his little savings to buy clothes. To the Collector No. 13, a Brevier Testament for Jane Williams, a servant in the family, who has been taught to read by the Collector, and cheerfully pays the costprice.-Adjourned.

3. TREASURER'S BOOK.

This book may be of the same size as the Collecting Book, but should be ruled according to the following Specimen.

Specimen of the Treasurer's Book.

It will be perceived that the account is balanced quarterly, pursuant to the VIIth Rule. The Dr. side occupies one page; and the C. side that which is opposite.

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1. The preceding details afford sufficient evidence of the importance of Juvenile Associations, as auxiliary to the British and Foreign Bible Society. But in estimating their value, we may take still higher ground, and contemplate their influence on the minds of the rising generation. If it be desirable that the benevolent principle should unfold itself at an early age; that the practical tendency of Christianity should be impressed on the hearts, and illustrated by the conduct, of the young; and that an attachment to the Sacred Volume, and a reverence of its Divine Author, should be cultivated and encouraged in the bosom of infancy; it requires but little argument to convince every unprejudiced mind, that the

Anticipated effects in the formation of character.

general establishment of these institutions would be productive of incalculable benefit; since it is impossible to imagine a measure better calculated to produce and extend these effects. Excluding all selfish considerations, it is a design of pure and unmixed charity in its best and widest range. The child who sacrifices some little personal indulgence in order to promote the circulation of the Bible, will be incited to read that Bible with increased diligence, and to ponder on its contents with greater attention. The very sacrifice will induce an examination of its object. The state of distant nations will become a subject of interest; and the privileges and blessings of our own be more justly appreciated. Nor is it an extravagant hope, that a sense of gratitude to the Source of all Good may be thus implanted in the youthful mind,

-may

"Grow with its growth, and strengthen with its strength;" and produce, in future days, the rich fruit of active piety and heartfelt peace.

2. When Juvenile Bible Associations are established in towns or villages, they should be frequently visited by one or more judicious members of the Auxiliary or Branch Committee. When they are instituted in schools, they should be under the superintendence of the heads of the seminary. Many young persons are supplied with pocket-money to an extent that frequently proves injurious; but it has been found, that the early habit of appropriating some portion of it to charitable purposes has counteracted this effect, and tended in no inconsiderable degree to form the future character on the basis of Christian benevolence.

3. Example has an immediate and powerful influence on the young; and happy would it be for our country and the world, were it attractive only when exhibited on the side of benevolence and virtue! The generous ardour of our British youth in this work of mercy excited, at an early period, a kindred feeling among their coëvals on the American continent, the first manifestations of which are thus described in the Report of the Philadelphia Bible Society for 1813:—

"It will be interesting to the Society to receive an account of a contribution to their funds, which, though it amounts to no more than one dollar and eighty-four cents. (rather more than six shillings), merits special commendation. It is the gift of a little girl; and was accompanied by the following letter from a respectable merchant of this city :-The donor of this small sum is a dear little female, about six years old. She reads the Scriptures daily, and never omits morning and evening prayers. Some time last fall, she read, or heard read, an Address of the Society

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