Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

without pain. Let our affection draw a ' the golden bowl broken;" that “the veil over her last agonies. It is enough body is returned to the earth as it was, that now " the silver cord is loosed and and the spirit to God who gave it."

THE GERMAN CRITICS AND JEWISH PROSELYTE BAPTISM. In the Montreal Register we find an article on this subject from the pen of F. Bosworth, A.M., classical tutor at the baptist college, Montreal, which deserves to be reprinted in this country. It was occasioned by the Review in our number for October last, in which we called on our learned pædobaptist brethren, either to answer Dr. Gill's refutation of the theory of Proselyte Baptism, or to cease to plead that theory in defence of their views. This having been copied into the Montreal Register, and excited some animadversion, the following excellent article appeared in a subsequent number.

Some time since an article on Jewish | Schneckenburger, whose work on this Proselyte Baptism appeared in the subject is ssic, and has exerted more Register, extracted from the London influence on the minds of German Baptist Magazine. It struck me on scholars than any other, asserts, that reading it, that as the subject is one of the reception of proselytes into Judaism, a purely historic nature, no testimony while the temple stood, was by circumcould be produced so valuable as that cision and an offering that the former presented by the great pædobaptist was followed, and the latter preceded, critics of Germany. What is the nature by a lustration, which was a mere of that testimony ? Let us see.

Levitical purification. He then goes on Böttiger, celebrated among German to say, “ This lustration, in time, asscholars, says that “the whole assertion sumed the place of the sacrifice, which (of proselyte baptism before John) is was omitted ; and this change cannot be absolutely destitute of proof.”

proved to have occurred before the end Dr. Lindner, of the university of of the third century."-Schneck. üb. Leipsic, uses the following language :- das Alter der jüd Pros. Berlin, 1828, “Let us follow scripture on this point; page 184. and we shall arrive at the conclusion The celebrated Neander, the prince of that the baptism of John is neither to be ecclesiastical historians, and one of the regarded as an arbitrary imitation of most erudite men in Germany, gives it customary ablutions, nor an unchanged as his opinion, that "since the thorough continuance of Jewish proselyte bap- work of Schneckenburger has made its tism, but as God's immediate command. appearance, no one will pretend that he A baptism of proselytes, as such, can prove the existence of a proselyte existed not among the Jews.”—Die baptism in the time of Christ.” Lehre vom Abendmahle, page 266.

Jacobi, of Berlin University, after Winer, in the last edition of his referring to the opinion of Danz and celebrated Bible Dictionary, states that others that Christian baptism was de

an independent initiatory rite, rived from Jewish proselyte baptism, necessarily connected with circum- says, “ But this opinion is not at all cision, and equal in importance to it, tenable.” He also asserts that it was baptism did not, in all probability, exist only after the destruction of the temple, before the destruction of the temple.”

when the circumcision of proselytes Realwörterbuch, art. Proselyten. vol. ii. had, by reason of public edicts, become page 341.

more and more impracticable, that

" as

forms nature to his will; nor is it less thought I should have died in the night the hand of the Divine Spirit that I felt death to be solemn;" but added attunes the heart to heavenly melodies. soon after, “Ever since my conversion

Her last illness was short, being con heaven has been to ine a very attractive tinued only about seven weeks. The place. Yet,” she continued, “I dare complaint from which she suffered being not, on account of my complaint, inan affection of the heart, to which she dulge in the delightful anticipation; it has been for many years subject in a would be too much for me." greater or less degree, and by which she A friend remarked, “You have nofelt that at any time she might be sum- thing now to do but to lie passive.” moned away, may help us in part to "No; nothing," she replied; "sweet account for that habitual preparedness to lie passive in his hand,” &c. It of mind for her great change which our was again said to her, “What a mercy friend cherished. But during her last it is that you have nothing to do but to illness this preparedness for death as- trust and expect! Your warfare is acsumed the form of desire “to depart complished; your sin is pardoned.” and to be with Christ, which” she “ Yes," she said, “it is a finished salvathought “far better.” To this effect, tion; a great sinner, but a great no doubt, the paroxysms of her com Saviour.” plaint tended, in which a most painful Toward this church (Keppel Street) sense of suffocation was produced, the she cherished grateful remembrances. strokes of the heart amounting to 170 On more than one occasion she said, per minute. Still, however, she main “I always look back with pleasure on tained resignation to the will of her having joined that church.” And when Lord. “Amidst all my trials,” said she, with us, as you know, she always sought “ life, with the presence of God, is very to be present at our meetings, and delightful.” And in her severest suffer- sometimes was so when her strength ings it was evident to all that she enter- was unequal to the exertion. tained less consideration for herself than Animated with love to the Saviour for those about her, lest they should be and regard for souls, she embraced fatigued in attending on her. My kind various methods of doing good unobinformant assures me that this benevo- trusively, yet was compelled to relinlent regard discovered itself even in the quish them, one by one, through bodily article of death; a short time before maladies. Just before her last illness, which event, seeing her sister look dis- when no other mode of doing good pretressed, she turned to her with much sented itself, she still sought to be useaffection, “I feel,” she said, " ready to ful by preparing for the Religious Tract exclaim with the apostle, “What mean Society an abridgment of the Life of ye to weep and to break mine heart?'

Cowper. Among books, “The Pilgrim's Pro As her end drew near her paroxysms gress,” the delight of all, and which of pain became more violent and the had often been her solace, seemed to sense of suffocation more distressing. A become even more so now. When read- friend standing near, believing that the ing the conflict between Christian and last conflict was at hand, said to her, Apollyon, her countenance seemed to “Heart and flesh faileth, but God is the express all the joy of participation in strength of your heart and your portion the victory

for ever." To this she responded, After a distressing night, she re For ever!” marked to her brother, “When I What remains cannot be contemplated

without pain. Let our affection draw a the golden bowl broken ;” that “the veil over her last agonies. It is enough body is returned to the earth as it was, that now “ the silver cord is loosed and and the spirit to God who gave it."

a mere

THE GERMAN CRITICS AND JEWISH PROSELYTE BAPTISM. In the Montreal Register we find an article on this subject from the pen of F. Bosworth, A.M., classical tutor at the baptist college, Montreal, which deserves to be reprinted in this country. It was occasioned by the Review in our number for October last, in which we called on our learned pædobaptist brethren, either to answer Dr. Gill's refutation of the theory of Proselyte Baptism, or to cease to plead that theory in defence of their views. This having been copied into the Montreal Register, and excited some animadversion, the following excellent article appeared in a subsequent number.

Some time since an article on Jewish Schneckenburger, whose work on this Proselyte Baptism appeared in the subject is classic, and has exerted more Register, extracted from the London influence on the minds of German Baptist Magazine. It struck me on scholars than any other, asserts, that reading it, that as the subject is one of the reception of proselytes into Judaism, a purely historic nature, no testimony while the temple stood, was by circumcould be produced so valuable as that cision and an offering--that the former presented by the great pædobaptist was followed, and the latter preceded, critics of Germany. What is the nature by a lustration, which was of that testimony? Let us see. Levitical purification. He then goes on

Böttiger, celebrated among German to say, “ This lustration, in time, asscholars, says that “the whole assertion sumed the place of the sacrifice, which (of proselyte baptism before John) is was omitted ; and this change cannot be absolutely destitute of proof.”

proved to have occurred before the end Dr. Lindner, of the university of of the third century.”-Schneck. üb. Leipsic, uses the following language : das Alter der jüd Pros. Berlin, 1828, “Let us follow scripture on this point; page 184. and we shall arrive at the conclusion The celebrated Neander, the prince of that the baptism of John is neither to be ecclesiastical historians, and one of the regarded as an arbitrary imitation of most erudite men in Germany, gives it customary ablutions, nor an unchanged as his opinion, that "since the thorough continuance of Jewish proselyte bap- work of Schneckenburger has made its tism, but as God's immediate command. appearance, no one will pretend that he A baptism of proselytes, as such, can prove the existence of a proselyte existed not among the Jews.”—Die baptism in the time of Christ.” Lehre vom Abendmahle,

Jacobi, of Berlin University, after Winer, in the last edition of his referring to the opinion of Danz and celebrated Bible Dictionary, states that others that Christian baptism was de"as an independent initiatory rite, rived from Jewish proselyte baptism, necessarily connected with circum- says, “But this opinion is not at all cision, and equal in importance to it, tenable.” He also asserts that it was baptism did not, in all probability, exist only after the destruction of the temple, before the destruction of the temple.” wizen the circumcision of proselytes Realwörterbuch, art. Proselyten. vol. ii. had, by reason of public edicts, become page 341.

more and

more impracticable, that

page 266.

proselyte baptism was raised to the which came into general reception in the character of an initiatory and indis- churches of Christ in the third, fourth, pensable rite.

and fifth centuries ? Nor can I think, To these might be added the opinions with many writers, that there is anyexpressed by Ernesti, Paulus, Bauer, thing mysterious in respect to the De Wette, Hase, Olshausen, and others, adoption of such a rite by the Jewish who all agree in asserting that proselyte churches. How obvious the idea, that baptism existed not before the destruc- a heathen man, who came over to the tion of the temple. Indeed, these are Jewish churches, was unclean in his the views of most German scholars of heathen state! And what could be more the present day. Would that all our natural than to require ablution of him, opponents were as thorough in their especially when the days of Pharisaic scholarship, and as candid in their state- superstition were fully come ? The ments !

rabbins tell us, that circumcision, bap.. It will not be thought improper to tism, and oblation were all necessary to conclude these remarks by some extracts his initiation. How, then, could the from Professor Stuart's work on Bap- baptism of John or of Jesus, which was tism, since that learned and impartial the sole initiatory rite, be derived from congregationalist has, it would appear, the proselyte baptism of the Jews? derived his opinions on the subject “Besides all this, when a proselyte before us from German writers, whose was once baptized and received, this rite statements he in fact epitomises. This was at an end. His children, born after erudite man says :

his reception, were no more required to “In fine, we are destitute of any early be baptized than those of the native testimony to the practice of proselyte Jews. What parallel, then, can be baptism, antecedently to the Christian drawn between Christian and proselyte era. The original institution of admit- baptism? ting Jews to the covenant, and strangers “Be the origin of proselyte baptism to the same, prescribed no other rite as it may, I cannot see that there is any than that of circumcision. No account adequate evidence for believing that it

other is found in the Old Testa- existed cotemporarily with the baptism ment; none in the Apocrypha, New of John and of Jesus." Testament, Targums of Onkelos, Jonathan, Joseph the Blind, or in the work From the researches of the aboveof any other Targumist, excepting mentioned scholars and others, the Pseudo-Jonathan, whose work belongs following conclusions are incontrovertito the seventh or eighth century. No bly obtained :-1. Infants of proselytes evidence is found in Philo, Josephus, or were not necessarily baptized with their any of the earlier Christian writers How parents. This Schneckenburger proves could an allusion to such a rite have from the following original authority : escaped them all, if it were as common, -" Infants who become proselytes with and as much required by usage, as their father are not obliged to be bapcircumcision?

tized, as the act of the parent is valid “That we cannot point out the exact for them.” 2. Children born after the time when proselyte baptism began reception of their parents into the among the Jews, is little to the purpose Jewish church were not baptized, as of those who hold to its great antiquity; various statements plainly prove. 3. In for where are the monuments which the Jewish initiatory rites circumcision, show how and when inany a rite began, baptism, and oblation, were all obserred.

of any

Thus in the Babylonish Talmud we tells us that “as the initiation was not read :-"He is not a proselyte until he religious but civil, it could not be per. is circumcised and baptized.” See also formed on the sabbath,” a fact which he the treatise above-mentioned, Winer's abundantly proves. 5. This baptism, Bible Dictionary, &c. This baptism such as it was, had no existence in the was originally a purification, and not an time of Christ. In the language of the absolute initiatory rite. Indeed, when pædobaptist Stuart, we ask, “What baptism began to be regarded as a part parallel, then, can be drawn between of the initiatory rite, Schneckenburger Christian and proselyte baptism?”

THE LATE REV. JAMES DORE OF MAZE POND. MR. EDITOR,—Some of us, whose sympathies range over two generations, find it pleasant now and then to warm our hearts by reviewing our former activities, so much eclipsed by the zcal and vigour of the present day; and, not the less delightful, to mingle with the love we bear to our pastors a grateful remembrance of those who once "had the rule over us,” and who, under divine influence, moulded us into the rude resemblance we may bear to the Great Model of all excellence. To some such it will not be uninteresting to read an account of the discovery of James Dore, who, in his day, was ardently beloved by his own people, and was also the highly respected associate of Booth, Fuller, Birt, Hall, Hughes, and others, who are now set as stars in the firmament of heaven, and formerly adorned end fertilized the water-walk of the Christian charch. It is contained in a letter (which I bave found among some old papers) from Mr, Reader, an independent minister in Hampshire, to the grandfather of the estimable treasurer of the Baptist Fund, Mr. William Lepard Smith ; and it furnishes also a pleasing illustration of the refined denominationalism of the last century. If you think well to make use thereof, it may prompt others of your readers to dig out similar historical remains for your cabinet.

Yours faithfully,

ABEJA. SIB,—The reason of my taking this text of scripture is proposed for persons liberty on so slight an acquaintance as that to give their thoughts upon it the folof a short agreeable interview at Newport lowing week. I attended at all the is this :-There is there a family of the meetings at both places while I was name of Dore, the father and mother of there, and at all of them, except the which are of the established church, but last, I heard the fourth son, James Dore, the eldest son in the baptist ministry at whom I suppose to be about fifteen or Cirencester by some signal steps of sixteen years old, and who is the immeProvidence, and, as I am informed, by diate object of this letter, deliver his encouragement which you kindly gave thoughts in a very proper, serious, and or procured for him. The two next sons, agreeable manner, quite in an evangelithere is reason to hope, received saving cal strain, in writing indeed, as most of impressions by means of the ministry of the others did, but so as to excite the Sir Harry Trelawney. The eldest of admiration of all that I heard speak these two is baptized among the baptists concerning him. This gave rise to a at Lymington, where he now lives. I thought that he was a proper person to heard the younger of them, that is, the be educated for the ministry, as well as third son, pray very agreeably at a his eldest brother. It appears probable private weekly meeting at Mr. Sturch's to me and Mr. Clarke, my son-in-law, vestry, at which, as also at a like meet- that he will hereafter, by some means or ing at Mr. Atkins's meeting-house, a other, be in the ministry; perhaps led

« AnteriorContinuar »