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HISTORY OF THE ORISSA MISSION.

RYDE, ISLE OF WIGHT.

papers, will desire information respecting In this town, which contains about seven passing events, such as no monthly publithousand inhabitants, we are informed that a cation can afford. On this subject we are few baptists meet for worship in a large com- anxious to offer a few words to those who are modious room, and are hoping to form a bap- the newspaper press. The observation of

not acquainted with the general character of tist church. To any of our friends who may be about to visit the island, it may be plea- many years, as well as that of the last fer sant to know that there is an opportunity to months, compels us to say, which we do with afford countenance to so laudable an effort, great regret, that it is vain to expect from and that they may obtain further information papers that are not avowedly dissenting, by calling on Mr. Anthony Young, 50, questions relating to the interests of evan

anything like impartiality or candour on Union-street, Ryde.

gelical nonconformists. The daily papers are accustomed to preserve a studied silence

respecting the movements of dissenters or to Mr. Peggs informs us that, through the misrepresent them; so that no one who kindness of a few friends, he hopes to cir- sees a daily paper only, or a weekly paper culate three or four hundred copies of this not conducted by dissenters, however talented, work in India gratuitously. He is about to liberal, or respectable in other matters, has send one to every missionary in India ; and, the slightest chance of obtaining correct views if he can obtain the co-operation of friends of passing occurrences which in a religious of India, he is anxious that a plan he has point of view are of the utmost moment. devised should be adopted for circulating that If there be any exception among the daily and other valuable works among the readers papers it is the Morning Advertiser. We of the English language in the east, at very think it right, therefore, to take this oppor. low prices.

tunity to say, that there are papers conducted by dissenters, which we can with a good con

science recommend. At the low price of one EDITORIAL POSTSCRIPT. penny per week, the Penny Christian Record

gives an excellent epitome of general intelliOur friends Dr. Cox and Mr. Hinton have gence. Being published in Jersey, to which taken a trip to the south of France, in conse- | island our stamp duties do not extend, it can quence of information communicated to the be sent free of charge by post to any town committee of the Baptist Missionary Society in Great Britain ; and as it has reached its a few months ago, respecting some protestants sixty-sixth number, we can speak with confiwho, with their ministers, have recently em dence both of the principles and the skill of braced our sentiments on baptism, to whom its conductors. Before this meets the reader's there was reason to believe that a visit from eye, they will have commenced also a larger one or two accredited English baptist mi- work, price two pence, entitled The Christian nisters would be in several respects bene- Record, which will include The Christian ficial,

Penny Record, with other matter. For those The Rev. C. H. Hosken, after labouring is an English weekly newspaper, The Non

who are willing to go to a higher price, there some years at Troy, in the state of New conformist, conducted with great ability and York, and Patterson in New Jersey, finding steady adherence to its principles, which are the climate there uncongenial with his constitution and that of Mrs. Hosken, has re

those of the British Anti-State Church Assoturned to his native land. He brings with which has been known as the chief organ for

ciation. Twice a week The Patriot appears, him letters from well-known American mi- the diffusion of dissenting information on nisters, attesting the esteem in which he was political and semi-political affairs too long to held, and their regret at his departure; and he will be glad to enter upon some sphere of need that we should now speak of its merits

.

There are two usefulness in this country.

or three other dissenting

papers, we believe, of small circulation, By a letter which we have received from which we cannot characterize, having never Fernando Po, of a more recent date than seen them. Thus, however, it will appear, any which had arrived at the Mission House that for one penny, two pence, sixpence, or when the Herald was prepared for press, we

ten pence per week, according to their taste learn that Mr. Fuller, whose dying state is or means, dissenters can supply themselves there announced, expired on the 23d of April

, with political information on which they may and that Mr. Clarke, and several of 'the rely; and we do beseech them not to take natives of Jamaica, were on board the Dove, their opinions of public men or measures about to sail for that island.

from either aristocratic or democratic journals

that are not cordially with them on great As a general election is commencing, it is pro- religious and ecclesiastical principles ; as, if bable that many of our friends, who are not they do, they will find that the light that is much accustomed to the perusal of news in them is darkness.

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ASIA.

CALCUTTA.

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis, whose transference from Ceylon to the continent of India has been already announced, arrived in Calcutta safely on the sixth of May, where they received a cordial welcome. Mr. Thomas says:

You will be pleased to hear that our dear | mine which has the greatest weight attached friends Mr. and Mrs. Lewis, and their little to it. When will you be able to send out one, arrived on the evening of the 6th. They more, and support them? I fear the heavy came by the “ Bentinck," and took us rather afflictions with which God has been pleased by surprise, as we hardly thought they would to visit Ireland and Scotland will very seventure to come so soon after Mrs. Lewis's riously affect the Society's income, and that confinement, and especially on account of the consequently you will find it necessary to advanced period of the season. But here curtail rather than extend the Society's exthey are, and I hope will not suffer from the penditure. exposure to which they have been subjected. You will be pleased to hear that brother We have not yet bad time to consult respect- Smylie, at Dinajpore, baptized one convert last ing the sphere of labour our new brother month, and also that brother Parry, of Jessore, should occupy ; I hope we shall be all guided admitted seven by the same ordinance into the for the best. Where so many urgent claims churches under his care. Brother Leslie is press on our attention, it is not easy to deter- rather ailing; the rest are in usual health.

Ram Jiban.

The Association of Baptist Churches in the Presidency of Bengal held its annual meeting for the year 1846 at Serampore. It will gratify many of our readers, probably, if we lay before them the minutes appended to their Circular Letter, which the press of other matter connected with our own annual meetings has precluded our doing till now :

On the evening of the preceding Lord's DINAJPUR ...Letter, no delegates, day, a preparatory sermon was preached in Lal Bazar, Calcutta ......J. Thomas, acting Pastor

J. L. Carrau, Deacon. the Mission Chapel, by the Rev. J. Mac

R. Chill. donald of the Free Church of Scotland, from DACCA........

...Letter, no delegates. Acis xx, 35.

CHITTAGONG ..................J. C. Fink.

Nabakumar.
Monday, November 30th.

CIRCULAR Road, Calcutta..Andrew Leslie, Pastor. The introductory prayer-meeting in Bengali BIRBHUM ....................J. Williamson, Pastor.

Sanatan. was held at Jannagar, at which brother J. C. COLINGAN, Calcutta........J. Wenger, Pastor. Fink of Chittagong presided.

Lalchand. At 7 P.M. the ministers and delegates as- HAURAH..

. Thomas Morgan, Pastor.

CUTTACK............ .....Letter, no delegates. sembled in the Mission Chapel : brother

BARISAL

Letter, no delegates. Wenger presided, and brother Phillips of Ba- Khari..

..Sheik Panjay. lasore prayed. The Circular Letter, prepared LAKHYANTIPUR. F. De Monte, Co-Pastor.

INTALLY, by brother Robinson of Dacca, “On Spiritual

..Geo. Pearce, Pastor. mindedness," was read and adopted. Brother NARSIKDAR CROK ..John C. Page, Pastor. Williamson of Birbhum concluded.

Lakshminarayan Ray.

Pitambar,
MALAYAPUR .......

Khasi.
Tuesday, December 1st.

BALASORE ...............

No letter, no delegate. 10 A.m. The Sessions of the Association JELLASORE.. ................Jeremiah Phillips, Pastor. were opened by prayer in English by brother

The meeting proceeded to elect a ModeraLeslie, and in Bengali by brother Carey. The tor for the ensuing year. This was done by roll of delegates was then called, and was ballot : the majority of votes being found in found to be as follows:

favour of brother Leslie of Calcutta, he was SERAMPORE W. H. Denham, Pastor.

requested to preside over the ensuing meetJohn Robinson.

ings.
Bhagwan,
}Deacons.

The whole of the letters from the churches
JESSORE.
.No delegates, no letter.

were then read, in the order they occur in the ...... W. Carey, Pastor. Table, and the substance of each given in

Balaram,

Ram Sundar, S

CUTWA

Bengali. The Moderator concluded the meet- i materials, others skilled in the native languages* ing with prayer.

may render these materials further available by The Sub-Committees met in the afternoon. members of our mission churches.”

translation and adaptation to the instruction of the In the evening a Conference was held at the College House, in lieu of the mixed ser Resolutions were read expressive of the vice of former years; several matters of great wish of the meeting that brother Leslie underinterest to the churches were introduced and take the editorial superintendence. Brother successively discussed.

Leslie declined on the ground of having It was announced to the meeting by the pledged himself to several important duties Convener of the Sub-Committee on Books : during the year, especially to the superin

1. That brother Pearce had carried through tendence of a new edition of the Hindi New the press a translation of the Tract Society's Testament, in addition to other claims. It " Companion to the Bible,” in the Bengali was proposed by brother Williamson, and language-the joint labours of brethren Pearce seconded by brother Page:and Ramkrishna ; it was a neat 12mo., pp.

“That for the present a Sub-committee be ap398, with copious tables.

pointed consisting of the Calcutta brethren; that 2. That brother Wenger begged to submit they meet and consult on the preliminary and neto the meeting the first sheet of a new magazine

cessary arrangements.

"The magazine to be printed at the Baptist Misin Bengali, bearing the title of the “ UPADE- sion Press, each number to consist of thirty-two shak.” It met with cordial approbation. The pages stitched, with wraper for advertisements and publication to be issued monthly, the price correspondence ; price not to exceed four annas, to not to exceed tuo annas. It was farther sug.

be paid half yearly in advance." gested, in case of a deficiency at the end of

This was passed unanimously. the year, that the Association meet the deficiency from its funds. The meeting unani; the seventh minute of the Standing Committee

The meeting then proceeded to consider mously concurred with the suggestion, and also authorized brother John Robinson to of the Society bearing the expenses of the de

(September 23rd), concerning the propriety close the remaining expenses of the EvangeList, and to communicate with the Standing legates of distant mission churches to the

. Committee at his earliest convenience. 3. That a lengthened conversation had

After discussing the question at some length, been held on the propriety and practicability seconded by brother Robinson, " That each

it was proposed by brother Morgan and of establishing an English Magazine to meet church bear the expenses of its delegates the wants of a large and increasing number of the members of our churches, especially appointed to attend the meetings of the Asthe younger branches of the various congrega- inconsistency of the principle on which the

Brother Morgan pointed out the tions. It was cordially commended to the consideration of the meeting.

Society had, to some extent, proceeded in After a spirited discussion, in which all

former years. This was generally felt, and took part, it was proposed by brother Denham the future travelling expenses of their dele

the ministers pledged themselves to and seconded by brother Morgan, and unani

gates from the funds of the respective mously agreed to

churches. That a magazine advocating the principles of

Proposed by brother Denham and seconded the denomination be established, similar to the by brother Morgan :Baptist Magazine, Reporter, and Record in England, to consist of original articles, general missionary “That the Standing Committee meet for prayer and edacational intelligence, as well as occasional and association business on the second Monday of selections, translations, and illustrations of the the months of March, Jure, and September succesHoly Scriptures, manners, customs, and supersti- sively at Calcutta, Haurah, and Serampore ; and tions of the natives ; notices of the spread of Chris- that the secretaries be requested to give notice of tianity, and eminent men, European and native, who the time and place of meeting one week previous to bave laboured among the people-in a word, every- its being held, to avoid inconvenience. Each meetthing calculated to subserve the interests of pure ing shall be named at the close of the usual busiand undefiled religion 'in India.

"THE ORIENTAL BAPTIST to be, as its title announces, a denominational work, and published Brother Wenger suggested to the members ander the auspices of the Association. Though of the Standing Committee for consideration, denominational it should practically disavow secta

“ the desirableness and practicability of a rianism, its columns should be open to free, fair, and manly discussion on all questions pertaining to Baptist Building Fund' in India, and to civil and religious liberty of Christians in India. report at the next Association.”

" The Home Record to comprise intelligence from The Conference was closed with prayer by all parts of India, Ceylon, and the Tenaskerim provinces; its For im Record, Europe, Africa, America, the Moderator. West Indies, China, and the South Scas : like its English predecessors, it should incorporate the

Welnesday, December 2nd. Misionary Merald.' * The Editor's Table to furnish notices of books,

10 A.m. Brother Wenger read John xv. &c., &c.; a column to be reserved for Gems of Din and prayed in Bengali, and brother Williamvinity and Poetry.

“In conclusion, European brethren should be solicited to contribute well written and well digested * Bengali, Hindi, Urdu, Singhalese, Burmese, &c.

meet

ness."

son of Birbhum preached an impressive ser-, the service, to receive the report of the Finance mon from John xii. 34. After the service Committee. the meeting proceeded to business. Brother Mr. Carrau informed the meeting that he Thomas intimated his readiness to undertake had been appointed to examine the accounts; the risk of printing the new magazine for one he found them to be correct, and that s year. He trusted the brethren would afford balance remained in the hands of the Treahim prompt and energetic assistance in their surer. respective circles, both by communications The Moderator inquired of the Secretaries and personal subscriptions, and thus extend if an answer hal been received to their letter its usefulness. Brother Morgan seconded from the Secretaries of the English Union, the proposal, and suggested that it be acted with regard to the subscription made oa beupon forthwith.

half of the brethren in Denmark. The The meeting then proceeded with the matter Secretaries regretted to state that no comme. of Finance. Brother Pearce proposed and nication whatever had been received from brother Williamson seconded :

England during the year, not even the usua!

" Annual Report of the Union." They were “That in addition to the publication of books, requested to mention this in their letter to the the Association meetings of 1844, the funds of this secretaries of the Baptist Union. union be available also for small grants of money in The report of the Sub-Committee was aid of needy churches in the mufassal, particularly adopted. Fraternal communications from towards the erection of places of worship and the brethren stationed in Lpper India and Bar. may be in the providence of God new and urgent mah were introduced to the mecting; the incalls for labour and assistance. Such grants to be telligence was highly gratifying, and a hope made by the vote of the Association at its annual

was expressed that other brethren might be meeting."

induced to follow their example, and occasioaEvening, 7 p.31. Brother Leslie introduced ally correspond with the Association. the service by reading and prayer. The As.

Brother Williamson of Birbbum was apsociation sermon in English was preachel by pointed to write the next Circular Leiter, and brother Morgan from Eples. iv. 13. The brethren Pearce and Denham were re-elected meeting was detained for a sbort time after secretaries.

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Mr. Parry having visited Badpukhariya in February last, and spent about nire days with the two Christian families residing in that village, writes thus on the 9th of March :

I am very happy to say that the Lord has | about the salvation of their souls. They used graciously added two members to the little to attend divine service on the Lord's day, but church of Badpukhariya. They received the never prayed in secret, and were in a state of rite of baptism a short time ago, and we have great ignorance about the gospel plan of salvaevery reason to hope that they will, by the aid tion. The work of grace I believe commenced of the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, honour in their souls about a year ago; and they the profession they have made. They appear have since been gradually growing in the to be very sincere, and earnestly desirous of knowledge of the Saviour, and praying in walking in the fear of God. They came from secret. About six months ago a decided Kapasdanga about two years ago, where I change of seriousness was visible in their debelieve they were nominally Christians. For 1 portment. At the church-meeting convened a long time they appeared to feel no concern by me to take into consideration the case of

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