Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

the school, but allowed him to come again literary courtesy would have left the task to on his earnest entreaty and promise of good Professor Conant, if he chose to assume it, conduct. If I had struck that lad when he especially as he had shown himself so comwas so irritated, or spoken harshly and petent to its performance. But for some angrily to him, his fury would have been reason or other, this course was not taken, quite ungovernable; but he can't stand a nor do we feel called upon to pass any word of kindness.'”-S. S. Union Magazine. further judgment upon the proceeding.

Since the publication of Mr. Stuart's trans

lation, Mr. Conant has printed a pamphlet TRANSLATIONS OF GESENIUS.

of fifty-three pages, in which he exposes Mr. The North American Review for July, in Stuart's errors with a considerable degree of a literary notice of the two translations of minuteness. The Andover professor can Gesenius' Hebrew Grammar, made by Pro- find no ground of complaint in this. The fessors Stuart and Conant, and the recent charges are clearly and strongly put, and suppamphlet published by the latter, exposing ported by the incontrovertible evidence of the errors and inaccuracies of Professor the original mistranslated passages. We Stuart, after speaking of the labours of Pro- have examined them carefully, and must say fessor Stuart in Hebrew philology, adds the fol- that the errors of Mr. Stuart are such that lowing remarks relative to the “ grammatical honest criticism could not pass them by. melee” which has arisen in consequence, be. They materially diminish the value of his tween these two eminent Hebraists.

work, and show indisputably that he ought Mr. Conant having translated the eleventh to give it a careful and thorough revision ; edition of Gesenius, is evidently no legal bar otherwise, the rival translation, which has the to another gentleman's translating the four- highest excellence of which such a work is teenth ; but we should suppose a liberal | susceptible, will altogether supersede it.

CORRESPONDENCE.

ON MINISTERIAL EDUCATION.

educated ; and I am exceedingly mistaken if To the Editor of the Baptist Magasine.

all that is wrong upon this subject might not

without any great difficulty be speedily set MY DEAR SIR, -As a member of the com- right with all that are really worth conciliating mittee of the Theological Education Society, towards it. you are no doubt aware that my connexion Those that shut their pockets against such with it as collecting agent is to cease with institutions, under the plea of an objection to the present quarter, through my inability to men-made ministers, that they may either procure upon its behalf what would justify hoard up their wealth, or spend it in worldly my being further retained, even at my ac- gratifications, have I suspect in general a knowledged moderate salary.

punishment in their own temper, and their I am sorry for my own sake, as well as for want of real spiritual consolations, that would the sake of the society, that the fact is so, readily proclaim to them their sin, if they for it would give me the most sincere pleasure were not under a spirit of delusion ; but a to see such a society suitably supported, and little right consideration on the part of our the salary in my circumstances was also to ministers, and the thinking part of our myself an object of considerable importance; churches, would I hope induce a conduct of but nothing is clearer to my mind, than that which they would not fail in a little time to our brethren in general are by no means discover the manifest advantage. properly sensible of the necessity that exists What is wanting is for our educated minisfor creating funds for the efficient support of ters to reflect how it is that they have acinstitutions for training our promising junior quired their present standing ; and for our brethren for the Christian ministry.

uneducated ministers to reflect upon the I do not indeed believe that the advocates difficulties they have had to encounter for for an ignorant ministry are at all numerous. want of a suitable training; and both should Even those that most loudly reprobate our seriously consider the duty which this imposes colleges, would, I suspect, in very few in- upon them in reference to the rising ministry. stances, be willing to sit regularly under a Churches also that enjoy an educated minisministry that was notoriously and outrage-try should have it urged upon them to conously ignorant ; and our churches, though sider seriously the source of their privilege, they may not have contributed sixpence in and our other churches should be taught fifty years to all our colleges unitedly, when how the want which they deplore may be they are in want of a pastor, (whatever may supplied in their after necessity; and a very be their means for supporting him) generally, slight systematic general effort will soon be if not always desire, very properly, to pro- found to be all that is necessary to provide cure one that has the character of being well | necessary funds, provided they are not to be

devoted to accumulating stones and mortar, tion for the year 1847," issued by the comto ape the state universities, with their accom mittee of the Baptist Union, is published, panying ruinous costly establishments. though, by some accident, it did not reach us

Many to whom I have applied for the time enough to receive a full and deliberate Theological Education Society have assured notice. It contains lists of baptist churches me of their good will, but “the calls upon in Great Britain, Ireland, and British North them are so multitudinous, that they cannot | America, with such other statistical informapossibly do what they desire for the old in- tion as it is accustomed to furnish. One stitutions, therefore they cannot contribute thing it is however important for its readers to any new society." Of this I cannot com: to remember ; we wish to call their attentioa plain, and most sincerely do I sympathize to it particularly, in order to guard them with our ministers and deacons particularly against mistaken conclusions. The “ General upon this subject, for, by my long connexion View of the State of the Denomination," the with the Irish Society, I well know the “ Tabular View," &c. are necessarily drawn, difficulty in which they are not unfrequently not from the returns of this year, but from placed in proposing additional collections ; the returns made in the spring and summer but if our rising ministry is to be efficiently of 1846. They are consequently more than trained, this difficulty must in some way be

a year old.

Any inferences derived from surmounted ; and though I have failed in my them respecting the present state of religion earnest and not inconsiderable effort, I shall among us, or the progress that has been made rejoice if, as in the case of Ireland, another of late, would be fallacious. They show, agent is' speedily found who will at least not what has been done the last twelve make the want of my service a matter of no months, but what had been done in the year importance except to myself personally. ending about midsummer 1846. The new I am, my dear sir, Yours very sincerely, association letters were not accessible when

STEPHEN Davis. these tables and calculations were made: 18, Upper North Place, Gray's Inn Road. some of them are not accessible even now.

We have just received publications from EDITORIAL POSTSCRIPT.

the United States, giving an account of the Our readers are aware that a remarkable annual meeting of the American Baptist old work exists in the Dutch language, en

Missionary Union. Our readers will be titled Van Braght's Bloody Theatre, or pleased to learn that it is said, “In reviewing Mirror of Baptist Martyrs, and that a trans- the history of the past year, the executive lation of this work has been contemplated committee have perceived so many marks of by the Council of the Hanserd Knollys So- divine favour to the missions, and so numerous ciety. At a meeting of the Council last and gratifying instances of spiritual prosweek, it was determined to prepare an En- perity and enlargement, that they invite the glish version for immediate publication ; and attention of the board to a particular consiwe have the pleasure to add that a specimen deration of some of them, as an expression of it may be expected in our next number. of their gratitude to God for his great mercies, The health of Mr. Abbott, Mr. Knibb's more vigorous prosecution of the missionary

and as an encouragement and incentive to a successor at Falmouth, Jamaica, has been work. In almost every mission, we might for some time failing, and he has felt appre- say in every mission from which the annual hensive that a return to this country would returns have reached us, God has distinctly become necessary. We regret to learn, by the manifested his gracious presence, and in iast packet, that his illness had increased, in most of them his power to create anew and consequence of which he was about to em to save. In several portions of our misbark for his native land.

sionary field, the months of harvest and the Dr. Cox and Mr. Hinton have returned in rejoicing reaper have continued through all safety from the south of France. At An the year. Verily “the ploughman has overgouleme, Bordeaux, and Pau, they were re

taken the reaper, and the treader of grapes ceived with cordiality by pious people, many

him that sowed seed.'» of whom have recently been brought to entertain right views of the ordinance of bap

A sentence in Mr. Fuller's excellent sertism, and to desire to conform to the will of

mon in our July number will be materially the Lord in respect to it. A Spaniard who improved by the correction of a small typowas educated for the Romish priesthood was

graphical error. baptized by Mr. Hinton in the Charente, near

twenty-one lines from the bottom, the word

must" should have been “ most." The Angouleme, and Dr. Cox baptized a minister in the Basses Pyrenees. A good work has like to die the death of the righteous

, but

sentence should stand thus :-“ You would recently been going forward in this district, to which, we doubt not, the visit of our

you do not desire to live his life, and you brethren will give a new impulse.

do not bear in mind that which daily ob

servation teaches, that men most generally The “ Manual of the Baptist Denomina die as they have lived."

In page 424, column 1,

[merged small][graphic][subsumed]

HOUSE IN WHICH THE OPERATIONS OF THE BAPTIST MISSION AT FALMOUTH, JAMAICA, WERE COMMENCED.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

ng stones and mortar, tion for the year 1847," issued by the se as a beir accom- i mittee of the Baptist Cnion, is pub ished,

...nents though, by some accident, it did not reach us

e irree for the time enough to receive a fun and deliberate ...IT ave issured notice. It contains iists of bapts ekorches

e as 'ipon in Great Britain, Ire and, and British Sorta

Si cer cannot America, with such other statistical informaesire or "ce via in- tion as it is accustomed to furnish, One

ar contribute tbing it is however im portant for its readers $. arnut coin' to remember ; we wish to call their attention

vat'. ze to it particularly, in order to guard them *** utlariy against mistaken conclusions. The General * vorexon View of the State of the Denomination, the

Tabular View,” &c. are necessarily dravo,

not from the returns of this year, but from Da uns ; the returns made in the spring and summer <?peper of 1346. They are consequently more than

vear old. Any inferences derived from

then respecting the present state of religia as. We among us, or the progress that has been made

of ate, would be fallacious. They show,

not what has been done the last twelve > -- salter 20 months, but what had been done in the year

cuing about midsummer 1846. The nes association letters were not accessible when these tables and caleulations were made: some of them are not accessible even now.

We have just received publications from

he United States, giving an account of the tremuual meeting of the American Baptist ******** IN Hissionary Union.

Our readers will be x 7.ased to learn that it is said, “In reviewing

ble history of the past year, the executive PITEELEST ommittee lave perceived so many marks of

vine fà vour to the missions, and so numerous und gratifying instances of spiritual pro

Terity md enlargement, that they invite the uri attenzon of the board to a particular consi

ization of some of them, as an expression of their matitude to God for his great mercies, aru s in encouragement and incentive to a Iture vigorous prosecution of the missionary

Lı almost every mission, we might

sy n every mission from which the annual um d

wurss jare reached us, God has distinctly Turen u ceniti, Iv tule manifestet is gracious presence, and i ti ne muse of them is power to create anes and

sare. In several portions of our mis

somars ie, the months of harrest and the iz ceny oppose turrei in Fueng reaper have centinued through 1 i da li ste venr. Verily the ploughman has ofer

taien the reaper, and the trader of grapes nisu mit wely one was propies many him that seed seed ** en is the ordinance of bag man in our July member will be materially

A sentence in M. Fuller's excellent ser senior te the lof Amproved by the corrective of a scall type

Shad the

graphical error. In page 124 columns oty-one lines from the bottom, the word

should have been m The ice should stand thes--You woul to die the death of the gres best lo not desire to live lists, and to

in mind that which can be

es that men mes generally lived."

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[merged small][graphic][subsumed]

HOUSE IN WHICH THE OPERATIONS OF THE BAPTIST MISSION AT FALMOUTH, JAMAICA, WERE COMMENCED.

« AnteriorContinuar »