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THE

Maidstone Standard.

SPECIAL NOTICE.

THE

“ MAIDSTONE STANDARD” is now published in a

greatly improved form, and contains, each FRIDAY EVENING, the latest and fullest LOCAL (to which especial attention is devoted), COUNTY, and TELEGRAPHIC NEWS, which enterprise can command.

THE "STANDARD"

is delivered on the evening of issue at any address in Maidstone,

at 1s. 3d. per Quarter,

Proprietor, CHARLES BAKER.

OFFICES : 94, WEEK STREET,

MAIDSTONE

THE

Maidstong & Kentisi

Journal.

ESTABLISHED

17 86.

CIRCULATES LARGELY IN KENT, SUSSEX,

AND SURREY.

Read by the Landed Gentry, the Clergy, the Agriculturist, and

the Trading Interests.

PUBLISHED THREE TIMES A WEEK,

MONDAYS, THURSDAYS, and SATURDAYS.

* An edition is now published EVERY THURSDAY, in time to be forwarded either by Post or by Carrier. It contains all the County and General News occurring between Monday evening and Thursday mid-day, which is thus supplied to non-subscribers earlier than through any other medium.

No additional charge is made to subscribers ; and no alteration will take place in the Monday's edition, which will, as now, contain the latest information, by telegraph and train, vp to Monday evening.

Advertisements and Orders for the Paper received at the

HEAD OFFICE, 13, MIDDLE ROW, MAIDSTONE;

And by all Booksellers and Newsagents.

THE KENT COUNTY PAPER.

The last Official Stamp Return published proved that the Stamped

Circulation of

THE SOUTH-EASTERN GAZETTE

Was Nearly as Large as the whole of the other Kentish

Papers put together, and, with only four exceptions, The LARGEST of all the PROVINCIAL NEWSPAPERS

IN ENGLAND

GOVERNMENT RETURNS.
SOUTH EASTERN GAZETTE

132,000
Maidstone Journal

50,957 Kentish Gazette

31,000 Kentish Herald

17,000 Kentish Observer

16,000 Dover Chronicle

9,500 Kentish Mercury

7,500 Dover Telegram

5,000 Tunbridge Wells Gazette

5,300 This Return proved that the Stamped Circulation of the SOUTH EASTERN GAZETTE was nearly as large (which it had been for many years) as the whole of the other Kentish Journals put together, their numbers beingSOUTH EASTERN GAZETTE

132,000 The WHOLE of the other Kentish Papers

141,975

IMPORTANT NOTICE.

THE SOUTH-EASTERN GAZETTE

IS NOW PUBLISHED ON
MONDAYS and SATURDAYS,

CONTAINING

MONDAY'S and FRIDAY'S MARKETS,

And Latest Telegraphic Messages, AT THE SAME PRICE WEEKLY For the TWO PAPERS as that lately charged for the Monday's edition.

Proprietors, F. & H. CUTBUSH. Head Office, MAIDSTONE,

MITRE HOTEL,
HIGH STREET, MAIDSTONE.
The above Old-Established Hotel affords every accommodation for the con-
venience and comfort of Private Families and Commercial Gentlemen.
WINES, SPIRITS, &c., OF SUPERIOR QUALITY.
GOOD STABLING.
SPENCER & SON,

Proprietors.

For Tobacco and Cigars with Excellence of Quality and Moderate

Charges, try

G. BOOZER,
Wholesale and Retail Tobacconist,

RAILWAY CIGAR STORES,
129, WEEK STREET, MAIDSTONE.
The BEST and CHEAPEST HOUSE for all KINDS OF TOBACCONISTS

FANCY GOODS. Hotels and the Trade Supplied at London Prices.

MARKWELL'S ROYAL HOTEL.

BRIGHTON.

BOARDING TERMS.
Table d'Hote. Elegant drawing room for ladies. Smoking room and
reading room, general coffee room, private sitting and bed rooms en suite.
Unequalled sea view. BATH ROOMS. Porter on duty all night.

J. MARKWELL, Proprietor.

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THE KENTISH MAGAZINE, .

JULY, 1878.

The Primitive Water-way to London.

THERE have been many naval commanders who have won a greater name in literature than Captain Large, of the Royal George. Nevertheless, the incidental mention of this bold sailor by Mr. Simpkinson, who will be best remembered as a connection of the Ingoldsby family, recalls an episode of the early days of the "Margate Boats." A generation ago these were just beginning to cultivate that taste for a sea voyage in a small way, which has since become so popular with Londoners. Some years ago, in Queenborough Creek, were discovered the timbers of a Danish galley, which had been embedded in the mud for eleven or twelve centuries, and antiquarians of the future may treasure the relics of a coasting paddle-boat or screw with a like interest, should they be discovered a thousand years hence, when those means of propulsion have become obsolete. We are so used now to the ordinary run “down the Thames,” past the ruddy cliffs of Sheppy, then along in front of Herne Bay and Reculvers, and round under the chalky heights of Thanet and the North Foreland, that to associate the idea of “down the Thames" with any

other possible route seems strange. For all that, there was a time when the traffic by water, between the coast of Europe and the city of King Lud, wound in and out by quite a different course. Whether the old Syrian navigators ever explored the south-eastern coast of Britain, or rounded the South Foreland, is by no means clear ; but long before Julius Cæsar's abortive invasion of Kent, ancient mariners were wont to visit the British settlements on this Cant, or “corner-land." The vessels then in use, and even those of much later ages, were of such a construction that “ blue water” was avoided as much as possible. Even the Roman ships, after they had shot across the Channel by the shortest practicable course, “hugged the shore” until the port they sought was gained. On land “the mightiest Julius”

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