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But such an honest chronicler as Griffith.
Whom I most hated living, thou hast made me,
With thy religious truth, and modesty,
Now in his ashes honour: Peace be with him!
Patience, be near me still; and set me lower:
I have not long to trouble thee.—Good Griffith,
Cause the musicians play me that sad note
I nam’d my knell, whilst I sit meditating
On that celestial harmony I go to. .

Sad and solemn musick.

Grif. She is asleep: Good wench, let's sit down

quiet, For fear we wake her ;-Softly, gentle Patience.

The Vision. Enter, solemnly tripping one after

another,? six Personages, clad in white robes, wearing on their heads garlands of bays, and golden vizards on their faces; branches of bays, or palm, in their hands. They first congee unto her, then dance; and, at certain changes, the first two hold a spare garland over her head; at which, the other four make reverend court sies ; then the two, that held the garland, deliver the same to the other next two, who observe the same

7

-solemnly tripping one after another,] This whimsical stage-direction is exactly taken from the old copy. STEEVENS.

. Of this stage-direction I do not believe our author wrote one word. Katharine's next speech probably suggested this tripping dumb-shew to the too busy reviver of this play. MALONE.

-golden vizards-] These tawdry disguises are also menttioned in Hall's account of a maske devised by King Henry VIII: " -- thei were appareled &c. with visers and cappes of golde."

STEEVENS.

8

order in their changes, and holding the garland over her head : which done, they deliver the same garland to the last two, who likewise observe the same order : at which, (as it were by inspiration,) she makes in her sleep signs of rejoicing, and holdeth up her hands to heaven: and so in their dancing they vanish, carrying the garland with them. The musick continues.

KATH. Spirits of peace, where are ye? Are ye

all gone?

And leave me here in wretchedness behind ye?'

GRIF. Madam, we are here.
KATH.

It is not you I call for :
Saw ye none enter, since I slept?
GRIF.

None, madam. KATH. No ? Saw you not, even now, a blessed,

troop
Invite me to a banquet; whose bright faces
Cast thousand beams upon me, like the sun ?

They promis'd me eternal happiness;
And brought me garlands, Griffith, which I feel
I am not worthy yet to wear: I shall,
Assuredly.

GRIF.I am most joyful, madam,such good dreams Possess your fancy.

9 And leave me here in wretchedness behind ye?] Perhaps Mr. Gray had this passage in his thoughts, when he made his Bard exclaim, on a similar occasion, (the evanescence of visionary forms) :

Stay, 0 stay! nor thus forlorn
Leave me unbless'd, unpitied, here to mourn!"

STEEVENS.

KATH.

. . Bid the musick leave, They are harsh and heavy to me. [Musick ceases. PAT.

Do you note, How much her grace is alter'd on the sudden? How long her face is drawn? How pale she looks, And of an earthly cold? Mark you her eyes ?!

GRIF. She is going, wench; pray, pray.
PAT.

Heaven comfort her!

Enter a Messenger.

Mess. An't like your grace,-
KATH.

You are a saucy fellow:
Deserve we no more reverence?
GRIF.

You are to blame, Knowing, she will not lose her wonted greatness, To use so rude behaviour : go to, kneel.

Mess. I humbly do entreat your highness'pardon; My haste made me unmannerly: There is staying A gentleman, sent from the king, to see you.

sure.

2

Mark you her eyes?] The modern editors readMark her eyes. But in the old copy, there being a stop of interrogation after this passage, as after the foregoing clauses of the speech, I have ventured to insert the

pronoun-you,

which at once supports the ancient pointing, and completes the mea

STEEVENS.
go to, kneel.]

Queen Katharine's servants, after the divorce at Dunstable, and the Pope's curse stuck up at Dunkirk, were directed to be sworn to serve her not as a Queen, but as Princess Dowager. Some refused to take the oath, and so were forced to leave her service; and as for those who took it and stayed, she would not be served by them, by which means she was almost destitute of attendants. See Hall, fol. 219. Bishop Burnet says, all the women about her still called her Queen. Burnet, p. 162. REED.

order in their changes, and holding the garland over her head : which done, they deliver the same garland to the last two, who likewise observe the same order : at which, (as it were by inspiration) she makes in her sleep signs of rejoicing, and holdeth up her hands to heaven: and so in their dancing they vanish, carrying the garland with them. The musick continues.

all gone?

KATH. Spirits of peace, where are ye? Are ye And leave me here in wretchedness behind ye?'

GRIF. Madam, we are here.
KATH.

It is not you I call for:
Saw ye none enter, since I slept ?
GRIF.

None, madam. KATH. No ? Saw you not, even now, a blessed

troop Invite me to a banquet; whose bright faces Cast thousand beams upon me, like the sun? They promis’d me eternal happiness ; And brought me garlands, Griffith, which I feel I am not worthy yet to wear: I shall, Assuredly.

GRIF. I am most joyful, madam, such good dreams Possess your fancy.

9 And leave me here in wretchedness behind ye?] Perhaps Mr. Gray had this passage in his thoughts, when he made his Bard exclaim, on a similar occasion, (the evanescence of visionary forms):

Stay, O stay! nor thus forlorn
Leave me unbless'd, unpitied, here to mourn!"

STEEVENS.

KATH.

. . Bid the musick leave, They are harsh and heavy to me. [Musick ceases. PAT.

Do you note, How much her grace is alter'd on the sudden ? How long her face is drawn? How pale she looks, And of an earthly cold? Mark you her eyes ?'

GRIF. She is going, wench; pray, pray.
PAT,

Heaven comfort her!

Enter a Messenger.

MESS. An't like your grace,-
KATH.

You are a saucy fellow :
Deserve we no more reverence?
GRIF.

You are to blame, Knowing, she will not lose her wonted greatness, To use so rude behaviour: go to, kneel.?

Mess. I humbly do entreatyourhighness'pardon; My haste made me unmannerly: There is staying A gentleman, sent from the king, to see you.

sure.

2

Mark you her eyes?] The modern editors read Mark her eyes. But in the old copy, there being a stop of interrogation after this passage, as after the foregoing clauses of the speech, I have ventured to insert the

pronoun-you,

which at once supports the ancient pointing, and completes the mea

STEEVENS.
-go to, kneel.]

Queen Katharine's servants, after the divorce at Dunstable, and the Pope's curse stuck up at Dunkirk, were directed to be sworn to serve her not as a Queen, but as Princess Dowager. Some refused to take the oath, and so were forced to leave her service; and as for those who took it and stayed, she would not be served by them, by which means she was almost destitute of attendants. See Hall, fol. 219. Bishop Burnet says, all the women about her still called her Queen. Burnet, p. 162. Reed.

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