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CRES. Nay, I'll watch you for that; and that's one of the chiefest of them too : if I cannot ward what I would not have hit, I can watch you

for telling how I took the blow; unless it swell past hiding, and then it is past watching.

PAN. You are such another!

Enter Troilus' Boy. ,

Boy. Sir, mylord would instantly speak with you.
Pan. Where?
Boy. At your own house; there he unarms him.!

Pan. Good boy, tell him I come: [Exit Boy.] I doubt, he be hurt.-Fare ye well, good niece.

CRES. Adieu, uncle.
Pan. I'll be with you, niece, by and by.
CRES. To bring, uncle,-
PAN. Ay, a token from Troilus.
CREs. By the same token-you are a bawd.

[Exit PANDARUS.
Words, vows, griefs, tears, and love's full sacrifice,
He offers in another's enterprize :
But more in Troilus thousand fold I see
Than in the glass of Pandar's praise may.
Yet hold I off. Women are angels, wooing :
Things won are done, joy's soul lies in the doing :

be;

9 At

1

your

own house ; there he unarms him.] These necessary words are added from the quarto edition. Pope. The words added are only—there he unarms him. JOHNSON.

joy's soul lies in the doing :) So read both the old editions, for which the later editions have poorly given :

The soul's joy lies in doing. Johnson. It is the reading of the second folio. Ritson.

VOL. XV.

Pan. Well, well ?—Why, have you any discretion? have you any eyes? Do you know what a man is ? Is not birth, beauty, good shape, discourse, manhood, learning, gentleness, virtue, youth, liberality, and such like, the spice and salt that season a man?

CRES. Ay, a minced man: and then to be baked with no date in the pye, —for then the man's date is out.

Pan. You are such a woman! one knows not at what ward you lie.?

CRES. Upon my back, to defend my belly; upon my wit, to defend

my wiles;& upon my secrecy, to defend mine honesty ; my mask, to defend my beauty; and you to defend all these : and at all these wards I lie, at a thousand watches.

PAN. Say one of

[ocr errors]

your watches.

6

- your date is

7

no date in the pye,] To account for the introduction of this quibble, it should be remembered that dates were an ingredient in ancient pastry of almost every kind. So, in Romeo and Juliet :

“ They call for dates and quinces in the pastry." Again, in All's well that ends well, Act I: “ better in your pye and porridge, than in your cheek.”

STEEVENS. at what ward you lie.] A metaphor from the art of defence. So, Falstaff, in King Henry IV.P.I: “ Thou know'st my old ward ; here I lay ;" &c.

STEEVENS.
upon my wit, to defend my wiles ;] So read both the
copies: and yet perhaps the author wrote:

Upon my wit to defend my will.
The terms wit and will were, in the language of that time, put
often in opposition. Johnson.
So, in The Rape of Lucrece:

“ What wit sets down, is blotted straight with will." Yet I think the old copy right. MALONE.

8

CRES. Nay, I'll watch you for that; and that's one of the chiefest of them too : if I cannot ward what I would not have hit, I can watch you

for telling how I took the blow; unless it swell past hiding, and then it is past watching.

PAN. You are such another!

Enter TROILUS' Boy. ,

Boy. Sir, mylord would instantly speak with you.
Pan. Where?
Boy. At your own house; there he unarms him.”

Pan. Good boy, tell him I come: [Exit Boy.] I doubt, he be hurt.-Fare ye well, good niece.

CRES. Adieu, uncle.
PAN. I'll be with you, niece, by and by
CREs. To bring, uncle,
PAN. Ay, a token from Troilus.
CRES. By the same token-you are a bawd.-

[Exit PANDARUS.
Words, vows, griefs, tears, and love's full sacrifice,
He offers in another's enterprize :
But more in Troilus thousand fold I see
Than in the glass of Pandar's praise may be ;
Yet hold I off. Women are angels, wooing :
Things won are done, joy's soul lies in the doing :'

9

1

At
your

own house ; there he unarms him.] These necessary words are added from the quarto edition. Pope. The words added are onlythere he unarms him. Johnson.

joy's soul lies in the doing :) So read both the old editions, for which the later editions have poorly given:

The soul's joy lies in doing. Johnson. It is the reading of the second folio. Ritson. VOL. XV.

S

Pan. Well, well ?—Why, have you any discretion? have you any eyes? Do you know what a man is ? Is not birth, beauty, good shape, discourse, manhood, learning, gentleness, virtue, youth, liberality, and such like, the spice and salt that season a man?

CRES. Ay, a minced man: and then to be baked with no date in the pye, —for then the man's date is out.

Pan. You are such a woman! one knows not at what ward

you

lie." CREs. Upon my back, to defend my belly; upon my wit, to defend my wiles ;upon my secrecy, to defend mine honesty ; my mask, to defend my beauty; and you, to defend all these : and at all these wards I lie, at a thousand watches.

Pan. Say one of

your watches.

6

[ocr errors]

- your date is

no date in the pye,] To account for the introduction of this quibble, it should be remembered that dates were an ingredient in ancient pastry of almost every kind. So, in Romeo and Juliet

“ They call for dates and quinces in the pastry." Again, in Atl's well that ends well, Act I: “ better in your pye and porridge, than in your cheek.”

STEEVENS. ? at what ward you lie.] A metaphor from the art of defence. So, Falstaff, in King Henry IV. P.I: “ Thou know'st my old ward ; here I lay ;" &c.

STEEVENS. upon my wit, to defend my wiles;] So read both the copies: and yet perhaps the author wrote:

Upon my wit to defend my will. The terms wit and will were, in the language of that time, put often in opposition. Johnson. So, in The Rape of Lucrece:

“ What wit sets down, is blotted straight with will.Yet I think the old copy right. MALONE.

8

CREs. Nay, I'll watch you for that ; and that's one of the chiefest of them too: if I cannot ward what I would not have hit, I can watch you for telling how I took the blow; unless it swell past hiding, and then it is past watching.

PAN. You are such another!

Enter TROILUS' Boy. ,

Boy. Sir, mylord would instantly speak with you.
PAN. Where?
Boy. At your own house; there he unarms him.!

Pan. Good boy, tell him I come: [Exit Boy.] I doubt, he be hurt.-Fare ye well, good niece.

CRES. Adieu, uncle.
Pan. I'll be with you, niece, by and by
CREs. To bring, uncle,
PAN. Ay, a token from Troilus.
CREs. By the same token-you are a bawd. -

[Exit PANDARUS.
Words, vows, griefs, tears, and love's full sacrifice,
He offers in another's enterprize:
But more in Troilus thousand fold I see
Than in the glass of Pandar's praise may
Yet hold I off

. Women are angels, wooing : Things won are done, joy's soul lies in the doing :

be;

1

9 At your own house ; there he unarms him.] These necessary words are added from the quarto edition. Pope. The words added are onlythere he unarms him. Johnson.

joy's soul lies in the doing :) So read both the old editions, for which the later editions have poorly given:

The soul's joy lies in doing. Johnson. It is the reading of the second folio. Ritson. VOL. XV.

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