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Yes! sigh'd o'er Delphi's long deserted shrine,

Stanza i. line 6.

The little village of Castri stands partly on the site of Delphi. Along the path of the mountain, from Chrysso, are the remains of sepulchres hewn in and from the rock: “One," said the guide,“ of a king who broke his neck hunting.” His Majesty had certainly chosen the fittest spot for such an achievement.

A little above Castri is a cave, supposed the Pythian, of immense depth ; the upper part of it is paved, and now a cow-house.

On the other side of Castri stands a Greek monastery; some way above which is the cleft in the rock, with a range of caverns difficult of ascent, and apparently leading to the interior of the mountain; probably to the Corycian Cavern mentioned by Pausanias. From this part descend the fountain and the “ Dews of Castalie.” And rest ye at our Lady's house of woe;"

Stanza xx. line 4.

The Convent of “ Our Lady of Punishment,” Nossa Şeñora de Pena*, on the summit of the rock. Below, at some distance, is the Cork Convent, where St. Honorius dag his den, over which is his epitaph. From the hills, the sea adds to the beauty of the view.

3. Throughout this purple land, where law secures not life.

Stanza xxi. line last.

It is a well known fact, that in the year 1809 the assassinations in the streets of Lisbon and its vicinity were not confined by the Portuguese to their countrymen; but that Englishmen were daily butchered : and so far from

* Since the publication of this Poem, I have been informed of the misapprehension of the term Nossa Señora de Pena. It was owing to the want of the tilde, or mark over the ñ, which alters the signification of the word: with it, Peña signifies a rock; without it, Pena has the sense I adopted. I do not think it necessary to alter the passage, as though the common acceptation affixed to it is “our Lady of the Rock," I may well assume the other sense from the severities practised there.

redress being obtained, we were requested not to interfere if we perceived any compatriot defending himself against his allies. I was once stopped in the way to the theatre at eight o'clock in the evening, when the streets were not more empty than they generally are at that hour, opposite to an open shop, and in a carriage with a friend; had we not fortunately been armed, I have not the least doubt that we should have adorned a tale instead of telling one. The crime of assassination is not confined to Portugal: in Sicily and Malta we are knocked on the head at a handsome average nightly, and not a Sicilian or Maltese is ever punished !

Behold the hall where chiefs were late conven'd!

Stanza xxiv. line 1.

The Convention of Cintra was signed in the palace of the Marchese Marialva. The late exploits of Lord Wellington have effaced the follies of Cintra. He has, indeed, done wonders : he has perhaps changed the character of a nation, reconciled rival superstitions, and baffled an enemy who never retreated before his predecessors.

Yet Mafra shall one moment claim delay

Stanza xxix. line 1.

The extent of Mafra is prodigious; it contains a palace, convent, and most superb church. The six organs are the most beautiful I ever beheld in point of decoration; we did not hear them, but were told that their tones were correspondent to their splendour. Mafra is termed the Escurial of Portugal.

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Well doth the Spanish hind the difference know
'Twixt him and Lusian slave, the lowest of the low.

Stanza xxxiii. lines 8 and 9.

As I found the Portuguese, so I have characterized them. That they are since improved, at least in courage, is evident.

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When Cava's traitor-sire first calld the band
That dy'd thy mountain-streams with Gothic gore?

Stanza xxxv. lines 3 and 4.

Count Julian's daughter, the Helen of Spain. Pelagius

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