Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

Abraham's posterity by

CHAP. XXV.

his second wife, Keturah.

of affection, independently of all other considerations, consult the experience and wisdom of the parents ; and seldom existed. And it must be allowed that matches the parents should ever pay much respect to the feelformed on the sole principle of conveniency might as ings of the child, nor oppose an alliance which may well be formed by the parents as by any others; be in all other respects suitable, because there may be and in Asiatic countries was generally so, for a lack of property on one side the intended match. there the female seldom presumes to have a choice If parents would proceed in this way, God would pour of her own.

| his blessing on their seed, and his Spirit upon their In all cases of this kind the child should invariably offspring.

CHAPTER XXV.

Abraham marries Keturah, 1. Their issue, 2-4. Makes Isaac his heir, 3 ; but gives portions to the sons

of his concubines, and sends them eastward from Isaac, to find settlements; 6. Abraham's age, 7, and death, 8. Is buried by his sons Isaac and Ishmael in the cave of Machpelah, 9, 10.

God's blessing upon Isaac, 11. The generations of Ishmael, 12-16. His age, 17, and death, 18. Of the generations of Isaac, 19, who was married in his fortieth year, 20. Rebekah his wife being barren, on his prayer to God she conceives, 21. She inquires of the Lord concerning her state, 22. The Lord's answer, 23. She is delivered of twins, 24. Peculiarities in the birth of her sons Esau and Jacob, from which they had their names, 25, 26. Their different manner of life, 27, 28. Esau, returning from the field faint, begs pottage from his brother, 29, 30. Jacob refuses to grant him any but on condition of his selling him his birthright, 31. Esau, ready to die, parts with his birthright to save his life, 32. Jacob causes him to confirm

the sale with an oath, 33. He receives bread and pottage of lentiles, and departs, 34. B. M. cir. 2:57. THEN again . Abraham took 2 And 6 she bare him Zimran, A. M. cir. 2155.

B. C. cir. 1849. a wife, and her name was and Jokshan; and Medan, and Keturah.

• Midian, and Ishbak, and Shuah.

[ocr errors]

a Chap. xxiii. 1, 2. —bi Chron. i. 32, 33.- Chap. xxxvii. 28; Exod. ii. 15, 16; xviii. 1-4; Num. xxii. 4 ; Judg. vi., vii., viii. NOTES ON CHAP. XXV.

Sarah, A. M. 2145. Jonathan ben Uzziel and the Verse 1. Then again Abraham took a wife] When Jerusalem Targum both assert that Keturah was the Abraham took Keturah we are not informed; it might same as Hagar. Some rabbins, and with them Dr. have been in the lifetime of Sarah ; and the original Hammond, are of the same opinion ; but both Hagar 70°vaiyoseph, and he added, fc., seems to give some and Keturah are so distinguished in the Scriptures, that countenance to this opinion. Indeed it is not very the opinion seems destitute of probability. likely that he had the children mentioned here after Verse 2. Zimran] Stephanus Byzantinus mentions the death of Sarah; and from the circumstances of a city in Arabia Felix called Zadram, which some suphis age, feebleness, &c., at the birth of Isaac, it is pose to have been named from this son of Keturah ; still more improbable. Even at that age, forty years but it is more likely, as Calmet observes, that all these before the marriage of Isaac, the birth of his son is sons of Abraham resided in Arabia Deserta; and Pliny, considered as not less miraculous on his part than on Hist. Nat., lib. vi., c. 28, mentions a people in that the part of Sarah; for the apostle expressly says, Rom. country called Zamarenians, who were probably the iv. 19, that Abraham considered not his own body now descendants of this person. DEAD, when he was about a hundred years old, nor the Jokshan] Several learned men have been of opiDEADNESS of Sarah's womb; hence we learn that they nion that this Jokshan was the same as Kachtan, the were both past the procreation of children, insomuch father of the Arabs. The testimonies in favour of that the birth of Isaac is ever represented as super- this opinion see in Dr. Hunt's Oration, De Antiquitate, natural. It is therefore very improbable that he had &c., Lingua Arabica, p. 4. Calmet supposes that any child after the birth of Isaac; and therefore we the Cataneans, who inhabited a part of Arabia Deserta, may well suppose that Moses had related this transac- sprang from this Jokshan. tion out of its chronological order, which is not unfre- Medan, and Midian] Probably those who peopled quent in the sacred writings, when a variety of im- that part of Arabia Petræa contiguous to the land of portant facts relative to the accomplishment of some Moab eastward of the Dead Sea. St. Jerome terms grand design are thought necessary to be produced in the people of this country Madinæans ; and Ptolemy 'a connected series. On this account intervening mat- mentions a people called Madianites, who dwelt in the ters of a different complexion are referred to a future same place. time. Perhaps we may be justified in reading the Ishbak] From this person Calmet supposes the verse : “ And Abraham had added, and had taken a brook Jabbok, which has its source in the mountains of wife (besides Hagar) whose name was Keturah,” &c. Gilead, and falls into the sea of Tiberias, took its name. The chronology in the margin dates this marriage with Shuah.] Or Shuach. From this man the Sacceans, Keturah A. M. 3154, nine years after the death of I near to Batania, at the extremity of Arabia Deserta,

A. M. cir. 2180.
B. C. cir. 1824.

B. C. cir. 1829

Abraham gives portions to his sons.

GENESIS

Age and death of Abraham. 3 And Jokshan begat Sheba, Abraham had, Abraham gave A. M. cir. 2175. and Dedan. · And the sons of gifts, and • sent them away

from A. M. cir. 2200. Dedan were Asshurim, and Le- Isaac his son, while he yet lived, eastward, tushim, and Leummim.

unto f the east country. 4. And the sons of Midian; Ephah, and 7 And these are the days of A. M. cir. 2183. Epher, and Hanoch, and Abidah, and Eldaah. the years of Abraham's life All these were the children of Keturah. which he lived, a hundred threescore and

5 And a Abraham gave all that fifteen years. he had unto Isaac.

8 Then Abraham gave up the ghost, and 6 But unto the sons of the concubines, which died in a good old age, an old man, and full

B. C. cir. 1821.

A. M. cir. 2175:
B. C. cir. 1829.

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

In our

towards Syria, are supposed to have sprung.

Bildad they count their lives even by years, but by days, living the Shuhite, one of Job's friends, is supposed to have as if they were the creatures only of A DAY; having descended from this son of Abraham.

no more time than they can with any propriety call Verse 3. Sheba] From whom sprang the Sabeans, their own, and living that day in reference to eternity. who robbed Job of his cattle. See Bochart and Calmet. Verse 8. Then Abraham gave up the ghost) Highly

Asshurim, and Letushim, and Leummim.) We know as I value our translation for general accuracy, fidelity, not who these were, but as each name is plural they and elegance, I must beg leave to dissent from this must have been tribes or families, and not individuals. version. The original word yu' yigva, from the root Onkelos interprets these words of persons dwelling in via gara, signifies to pant for breath, to expire, to cease camps, tents, and islands; and Jonathan ben Uzziel calls from breathing, or to breathe one's last; and here, them merchants, artificers, and heads or chiefs of people. and wherever the original word is used, the simple

Verse 4. Ephah, and Epher, cfc.] Of these we know term expired would be the proper expression. no more than of the preceding; an abundance of con- translation this expression occurs Gen. xxv. 8, 17; jectures is already furnished by the commentators. xxxv. 29; xlix. 33; Job iii. 11 ; x. 18 ; xi. 20 ; xiii.

Verse 5. Gave all that he had unto Isaac.] His prin- 19; xiv. 10; Lam. i. 19; in all of which places the cipal flocks, and especially his right to the land of Ca- original is yua gava. It occurs also in our translation, naan, including a confirmation to him and his posterity Jer. XV. 9, but there the original is 1953 ind) napheof whatever was contained in the promises of God. cah naphshah, she breathed out her soul; the verb via

Verse 6. Unto the sons of the concubines] Viz., gava not being used. Now as our English word ghost, Hagar and Keturah, Abraham gave gifts. Cattle for from the Anglo-Saxon zart gast, an inmate, inhabitant, breed, seed to sow the land, and implements for hus- guest, (a casual visitant,) also a spirit, is now restricted bandry, may be what is here intended.

among us to the latter meaning, always signifying the And sent them away-while he yel lived] Lest after immortal spirit or soul of man, the guest of the body ; • his death they should dispute a settlement in the Land and as giving up the spirit, ghost, or soul, is an act not of Promise with Isaac; therefore he very prudently proper to man, though commending it to God, in our sent them to procure settlements during his lifetime, last moments, is both an act of faith and piety; and that they might be under no temptation to dispute the as giving up the ghost, i. e., dismissing his spirit from settlement with Isaac in Canaan. From this circum- his body, is attributed to Jesus Christ, to whom alone stance arose that law which has prevailed in almost it is proper, I therefore object against its use in every all countries, of giving the estates to the eldest son by other case. a lawful wife ; for though concubines, or wives of the Every man since the fall has not only been liable to second rank, were perfectly legitimate in those ancient death, but has deserved it, as all have forfeited their times, yet their children did not inherit, except in case lives because of sin.' Jesus Christ, as born immacuof the failure of legal issue, and with the consent of late, and having never sinned, had not forfeited his life, the lawful wife ; and it is very properly observed by and therefore may be considered as naturally and proCalmet, that it was in consequence of the consent of perly immortal. No man, says he, taketh itmy life, Leah and Rachel that the children of their slaves by from me, but I lay it down of myself ; I have power Jacob had a common and equal lot with the rest. By to lay it down, and I have power to take it again: therea law of Solon all natural children were excluded from fore doth the Father love me, because I lay down my the paternal inheritance, but their fathers were per- life that I might take it again, John x. 17, 18. Hence mitted to give them any sum not beyond a thousand we rightly translate Matt. xxvii. 50, aonke to avevua, drachma by way of present.

he gave up the ghost ; i. e., he dismissed his spirit Eastward, unto the east country.] Arabia Deserta, that he might die for the sin of the world. The Evanwhich was eastward of Beer-sheba, where Abraham gelist St. John, xix. 30, makes use of an expression lived.

to the same import, which we translate in the same Verse 7. The days of the years, 8c.] There is a way, rapedwKE TO. Tvevua, he delivered up his spirit. beauty in this expression which is not sufficiently re- wė translate Mark xv. 37, and Luke xxiii. 46, he garded. Good men do not live by centuries, though gave up the ghost, but not correctly, because the word many such have lived several hundred years, nor dol in both these places is very different, eeTVEVOE, he

Isaac and Ishmael bury Abraham CHAP. XXV.

in the cave of Machpelah. A M. cir. 2193. of years ; and was gathered him in the cave of Machpelah, in A. M. cir. 2193. C. to his people.

the field of Ephron the son of 9 And his sons Isaac and Ishmael buried Zohar the Hittite, which is before Mamre ;

B. C. cir. 1821.

[ocr errors]

Chap. xxxv. 29; xlix. 33.

Chap. xxxv. 29; 1. 13. breathed his last, or expired, though in the latter place Et nec opinanti mors ad caput astitit ante, . (Luke xxiii. 46) there is an equivalent expression, O Quam satur, ac plenus possis discedere rerum. Father, into thy hands παρατιθεμαι το πνευμα μου, I

Ib. ver. 972. commil my spirit, i: e., I place my soul in thy hand;

And unexpected hasty death destroys, proving that the act was his own, that no man could

Before thy greedy mind is FULL of Joys. Idem. take his life away from him, that he did not die by the perfidy of his disciple, or the malice of the Jews, but

Horace makes use of the same figure : by his own free act. Thus he laid down his life for Inde fit, ut raro, qui se vixisse beatum the sheep. Of Ananias and Sapphira, Acts v. 5, 10, Dicat, et exacto CONTENTUS tempore vitæ and of Herod, Aets xii. 23, our translation says they Cedat, ut CONVIVA SATUR, reperire queamus. gave up the ghost ; but the word in both places is

Sal. l. i. Sat. i. ver. 117. EFEUVES, which simply means to breathe out, to expire,

From hence how few, like SATED GUESTS, depart or die; but in no case, either by the Septuagint in the

From life's FULL BANQUET with a cheerful heart ? Old or any of the sacred writers in the New Testa

FRANCIS. ment, is αφηκε το πνευμα οι παρεδωκε το πνευμα, he dismissed his spirit or delivered up his spirit, spoken The same image is expressed with strong ridicule of any person but Christ. Abraham, Isaac, Ishmael, in his last Epistle Jacob, &c., breathed their last ; Ananias, Sapphira, Lusisti satis, edisti satis, atque hibisti ; and Herod expired; but none, Jesus Christ excepted, Tempus ABIRE tibi est. Epist. I. ii., ver. 216. gare up the ghost, dismissed, or delivered up his own spirit, and was consequently free among the dead. Of

Thou hast eaten, drunk, and play'd ENOUGH; then why

So stark roluctant to leave off, and die ? the patriarchs, &c., the Septuagint uses the word ekhelwwv, failing, or KatetavOe, he ceased or rested.

The poet Statius uses abire paratum, PLENUM vita, An old man Viz., one hundred and seventy-five,“ prepared to depart, being FULL of life,” in exactly the youngest of all the patriarchs; and full of years. the same sense :The word years is not in the text; but as our trans

-Dubio quem non in turbine rerum lators saw that some word was necessary to fill up the Deprcndet suprema dies ; sed abire paratum, text, they added this in Italics. It is probable that the

AC PLENUM VITA. true word is 'g' yamim, days, as in Gen. xxxv.-29;

Sylv. I. ii., Villa Surrentina, ver. 128, and this reading is found in several of Kennicott's and De Rossi's MSS., in the Samaritan text, Septuagint,

The man whose mighty soul is not immersed

In dubious whirl of secular concerns, Vulgate, Syriac, Arabic, Persic, and Chaldee. On these

His final hour ne'er takes him by surprise, authorities it might be safely admitted into the text. Being full of days, or full of years.—To be satiated

But, Full of LIFE, he stands PREPARED to die. with days or life, has been in use among different na- It was the opinion of Aristotle that a man should tions to express the termination of life, and especially depart from life as he should rise from a banquet. life ended without reluctance. It seems to be a meta- Thus Abraham died full of days, and satisfied with phor taken from a guest regaled by a plentiful banquet, life, but in a widely different spirit from that recom. and is thus used by the Roman poets.

mended by the above writers—He left life with a hope Lucretius, lib. iii., ver. 947, ridiculing those who full of immortality, which they could never boast ; for were unreasonably attached to life, and grievously af- he saw the day of Christ, and was glad ; and his hope ficted at the prospect of death, addresses them in the was crowned, for here it is expressly said, He was following manner :

gathered to his fathers ; surely not to the bodies of his

sleeping ancestors, who were buried in Chaldea and -Quid mortem congemis, ac Aes?

not in Canaan, nor with his fathers in any sense, for Nam si grata fuit tibi vita anteacta, priorque,

he was deposited in the cave where his wife alone Et non omnia pertusum congesta quasi in vas

slept ; but he was gathered to the spirits of just men Commoda perfluxere, atque ingrata interiere :

made perfect, and to the Church of the first-born, whose Cur non, ut PLENUS VITÆ CONVIVA, RECEDIS ?

names are written in heaven; Heb. xii. 23. Fond mortal, what is the matter, thou dost sigh? Verse 9. His sons Isaac and Ishmael buried him] Why all these fears because thou once must die? Though Ishmael and his mother had been expelled from For if the race thou hast already run

Abraham's family on the account of Isaac, yet, as he Was pleasant, if with joy thou saw'st the sun, was under the same obligation to a most loving affecIf all thy pleasures did not pass thy mind

tionate father as his brother Isaac, if any personal feuds As through a sieve, but left some sweets behind, remained, they agreed to bury them on this occasion, Why dost thou not then, like a THANKFUL GUEST, that both might dutifully join in doing the last offices Rise cheerfully from life's ABUNDANT FEAST ? to a parent who was an honour to them and to human

CREECH.

,
nature ; and, considering the rejection of Ishmael from

Rebekah veils herself.

GENESIS. She becomes the wife of Isaac. A. M. 2148. 65 For she had said unto the 66 And the servant told Isaac A. M. 2148. B. C. 1856.

B. C. 1856. servant, What man is this that all things that he had done. walketh in the field to meet And 67 And Isaac brought her into his mother the servant had said, It is my master : 12 Sarah's tent, and took Rebekah, and she therefore she took Ya veil, and covered became his wife ; and he loved her: and herself.

Isaac a was comforted after his mother's death.

[ocr errors]

us ?

y Chap. xx. 16; 1 Cor. xii 1, 6, 10.

2

Chap. xviii. 6, 9, 10.

Chap. xxxviii. 12; 1 Thess. iv. 15.

the ground. What the subject of his meditation was whole economy of providence and grace is ever at it is useless to inquire ; he was a pious man, and could work. not be triflingly employed.

Abraham's solicitude to get a suitable wise for his Verse 65. She took a veil] 99307 hatstsaaif. This son is worthy of the most serious regard. He was is the first time this word occurs, and it is of doubtful well aware that if Isaac formed a matrimonial alliance signification ; but most agree to render it a veil or a with the Canaanites it might be ruinous to his piety, cloak. The former is the most likely, as it was gene- and prevent the dissemination of the true religion ; rally used by women in the east as a sign of chastity, therefore he binds his most trusty servant by a solema modesty, and subjection.

oath not to take a wife for his son from the daughters Verse 67. Sarah's tent] Sarah being dead, her of Canaan, but from his own kindred, among whom tent became now appropriated to the use of Rebekah. the knowledge of the true God was best preserved.

And took Rebekah, fc.) After what form this was Others had different : rays of the light of truth, but done we are not told; or whether there was any form Abraham's family alone had the truth; and to the used on the occasion, more than solemnly receiving descendants of this family were the promises made. her as the person whom God had chosen to be his How careful should parents be to procure alliances wife ; for it appears from ver. 66 that the servant for their children with those who fear God, as so told him all the especial providential circumstances much of the peace and comfort of the children, and the which had marked his journey. The primitive form happiness of their posterity, depend on this circumof marriage we have already seen, chap. ii. 23, 24, stance ! But alas! how many sacrifice the comfort which, it is likely, as far as form was attended to, and salvation of their offspring at the shrine of Mamwas that which was commonly used in all the pa- mon! If they can procure rich husbands and wives triarchal times..

for their daughters and sons, then all, in their appre

hension, is well. Marriages of this kind may be conIn this chapter we have an affecting and edifying sidered as mere bargain and sale ; for there is scarcely display of that providence by which God disposes and ever any reference to God or eternity in them. The governs the affairs of the universe, descending to the Divine institution of marriage is left out of sight; and minutest particulars, and managing the great whole by the persons are united, not properly to each other, in directing and influencing all its parts. This particular the love, fear, and according to the ordinance of God, or especial providence we see is not .confined to work but they are wedded to so many thousand pounds sterby general laws ; it is wise and intelligent, for it is ling, and to so many houses, fields, &c. Thus like the mind, the, will, and energy of God; it steps out of goes to like, metal to metal, earth to earth. Marriages common ways, and takes particular directions, as end- formed on such principles are mere licensed adulteries. lessly varied human necessities may need, or the Let such contractors hear these awful words of God : establishment and maintenance of godliness in the. " Ye adulterers and adulteresses, know ye not that the earth may require. What a history of providential friendship of the world is enmity with God ?” James occurrences, coming all in answer to the prayer and iv. 4. See on ver. 36. faith of a simple, humble individual, does this chapter Although under the patriarchal dispensation parents exhibit!

had a kind of absolute authority over their children, As Abraham's servant has God's glory only in view and might dispose of them as they pleased in general in the errand on which he is going, he may well expect cases, yet it appears that in matrimonial connections the Divine direction. See with what simplicity and they were under no compulsion. The suitable person confidence he prays to God! He even prescribes the was pointed out and recommended ; but it does not way in which the Divine choice and approbation shall appear that children were forced, against the whole be made known; and God honours the purity of his tide of their affections, to take those persons who were motives and his pious faith, by giving him precisely the the objects of the parent's choice. Wilt thou go with answer he wished. How honourable in the sight of this man? was, in all likelihood, deemed essential to God is simplicity of heart! It has nothing to fear, the completion of the contract; and by the answer, I and all good to hope for ; whereas a' spirit warped by will go, was the contract fully ratified. Thus the perself-interest and worldly views is always uncertain and sons were ultimately left to their own choice, though ngitâted, as it is ever seeking that from its own coun- the most prudent and proper means were no doubt sels, projects, and schemes, which should be sought in used in order to direct and fix it. Whether this was God alone. In every place the upright man meets precisely the plan followed in primitive times we canwith his God; his heart acknowledges his Maker, not absolutely say : they were times of great simpliand his Maker acknowledges him ; for such a one the city; and probably connections on the mere principle

Abraham's posterity by

CHAP. XXV.

his second wife, Keturah. of affection, independently of all other considerations, consult the experience and wisdom of the parents; and seldom existed. And it must be allowed that matches the parents should ever pay much respect to the feelformed on the sole principle of conveniency might as ings of the child, nor oppose an alliance which may well be formed by the parents as by any others; be in all other respects suitable, because there may be and in Asiatic countries it was generally so, for a lack of property on one side of the intended match. there the female seldom presumes to have a choice If parents would proceed in this way, God would pour of her own.

his blessing on their seed, and his Spirit upon their In all cases of this kind the child should invariably | offspring.

CHAPTER XXV.

Abraham marries Keturah, I. Their issue, 2-4. Makes Isaac his heir, 5 ; but gives portions to the sons

of his concubines, and sends them eastward from Isaac, to find settlements; 6. Abraham's age, 7, and death, 8. Is buried by his sons Isaac and Ishmael in the cave of Machpelah, 9, 10. God's blessing upon Isaac, 11. The generations of Ishmael, 12-16. His age, 17, and death, 18.. Of the generations of Isaac, 19, who was married in his furtieth year, 20. Rebekah his wife being barren, on his prayer to God she conceives, 21. She inquires of the Lord concerning her state, 22. The Lord's answer, 23. She is delivered of twins, 24. Peculiarities in the birth of her sons Esau and Jacob, from which they had their names, 25, 26. Their different manner of life, 27, 28. Esau, returning from the field faint, begs poltage from his brother, 29, 30. Jacob refuses to grant him any but on condition of his selling him his birthright, 31. Esau, ready to die, parts with his birthright to save his life, 32. Jacob causes him to confirm

the sale with an oath, 33. He receives bread and pottage of lentiles, and departs, 34. 8: M. cir : 2854. THEN again • Abraham took 2 And 6 she bare him Zimran, A. M. cir. 2155.

B. C. cir. 1849. a wife, and her name was and. Jokshan; and Medan, and Keturah.

Midian, and Ishbak, and Shuah.

Per te verse 2. Zimran Stephanus Byzantinus mentions

* Chap. xxiii. 1, 2. _b1 Chron. i. 32, 33. - Chap. xxxvii. 28; Exod. ii. 15, 16; xviii. 1-4; Num. xxii. 4 ; Judg. vi., vii., viii. NOTES ON CHAP. XXV.

Sarah, A. M. 2145. Jonathan ben Uzziel and the Verse 1. Then again Abraham took a wife] When Jerusalem Targum both assert that Keturah was the Abraham took Keturah we are not informed; it might same as Hagar. Some rabbins, and with them Dr. have been in the lifetime of Sarah ; and the original | Hammond, are of the same opinion ; but both Hagar 90's vaiyoseph, and he added, fc., seems to give some and Keturah are so distinguished in the Scriptures, that countenance to this opinion. Indeed it is not very the opinion seems destitute of probability. likely that he had the children mentioned here after the death of Sarah ; and from the circumstances of a city in Arabia Felix called Zadram, which some suphis age, feebleness, &c., at the birth of Isaac, it is pose to have been named from this son of Keturah ; still more improbable. Even at that age, forty years but it is more likely, as Calmet observes, that all these before the marriage of Isaac, the birth of his son is sons of Abraham resided in Arabia Deserta; and Pliny, considered as not less miraculous on his part than on Hist. Nat., lib. vi., c. 28, mentions a people in that the part of Sarah; for the apostle expressly says, Rom. country called Zamarenians, who were probably the iv. 19, that Abraham considered not his own body now descendants of this person. DE AD, when he was about a hundred years old, nor the Jokshan) Several learned men have been of opiDEADNESS of Sarah's.womb; hence we learn that they nion that this Jokshan was the same as Kachtan, the were both past the procreation of children, insomuch father of the Arabs. The testimonies in favour of that the birth of Isaac is ever represented as super- this opinion see in Dr. Hunt's Oration, De Antiquitate, natural. It is therefore very improbable that he had &c., Lingua Arabicæ, p. 4. Calmet supposes that any child after the birth of Isaac ; and therefore we the Cataneans, who inhabited a part of Arabia Deserta, may well suppose that Moses had related this transac- sprang from this Jokshan. tion out of its chronological order, which is not unfre- Medan, and Midian) Probably those who peopled quent in the sacred writings, when a variety of im- that part of Arabia Petræa contiguous to the land of portant facts relative to the accomplishment of some Moab eastward of the Dead Sea. St. Jerome terms grand design are thought necessary to be produced in the people of this country Madinæans ; and Ptolemy 'a connected series. On this account intervening mat- mentions a people called Madianiles, who dwelt in the ters of a different complexion are referred to a future same place. time. Perhaps we may be justified in reading the Ishbak] From this person Calmet supposes the verse : “ And Abraham had added, and had taken a brook Jabbok, which has its source in the mountains of wife (besides Hagar) whose name was Keturah,” &c. Gilead, and falls into the sea of Tiberias, took its name. The chronology in the margin dates this marriage with Shuah.) Or Shuach. From this man the Sacceans, Keturah A. M. 8154, nine years after the death of l near to Batania, at the extremity of Arabia Deserta,

« AnteriorContinuar »