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Sketch of the history

CHAP. XXXIV.

and character of Moses. tally forgetting himself and his own secular interest, | visible world. No testiness, no murmuring, no expawith that also of his family, he laboured incessantly to tiating on former services; no passionate entreaties tó promote God's honour and the people's welfare, which have the sentence reversed, appear in the spirit or on many occasions he showed were dearer to him than conduct of this truly great man. He bowed to the his own life. Moses was in every respect a great decision of that justice which he knew could not act man; for every virtue that constitutes genuine nobility wrong; and having buried the world, as to himself, he was concentred in his mind, and fully displayed in his had no earthly attachments; he was obeying the will conduct. He ever conducted himself as a man con- of God in leading the people, and therefore, when his scious of his own integrity, and of the guidance and Master chose to dismiss him from this service, he was protection of God, under whose orders he constantly content; and saw, without regret or envy, another apacted. He therefore betrays no confusion in his views, pointed to his office. nor indecision in his measures; he was ever without The moral character of Moses is almost immaculate. anriety, because he was conscious of the rectitude of That he offended Jehovah at the waters of Meribah his motives, and that the cause which he espoused was there can be no doubt; but in what the offence conthe cause of God, and that his power and faithfulness sisted, commentators and critics are greatly at a loss were pledged for his support. His courage and forti- to ascertain. In the note on Num. xx. 12, I have tude were unshaken and unconquerable, because his said all that I believe should be said upon the point; reliance was unremittingly fixed on the unchangeable- and after all, conjecture is obliged to come in, to supness of Jehovah. He left Egypt having an eye to the ply the place of substantial evidence; and the fault is recompense of reward in another world, and never lost so slight, humanly speaking, as even to glide away sight of this grand object; he was therefore neither from the eye of conjecture itself. Had the offence, discouraged by difficulties, nor elated by prosperity. whatever it was, been committed by any ordinary perHe who in Egypt refused to be called the son of Pha- son, it would probably have passed between God and raoh's daughter, thereby renouncing the claim he might the conscience without any public reprehension. But have had on the Egyptian throne, was never likely to Moses was great, and supereminently favoured ; and a be influenced by secular views in the government of fault in him derived much of its moral delinquency the miserable multitudes which he led out of that from these very circumstances. He did not sanctify country. His renunciation of the court of Pharaoh the Lord in the sight of the peoplehe did not fully and its advantages was the amplest proof that he show that God himself was the sole worker; he apneither sought nor expected honour or emolument in peared by his conduct to exhibit himself as an agent the wilderness, among a people who had scarcely any indispensably necessary in the promised miraculous thing but what they received by immediate miracle supply; and this might have had the most dangerous from the hand of God.

consequences on the minds of this gross people, had I have more than once had occasion to note the dis- not God thus marked it with his displeasure. This interestedness of Moses in reference to his family, as awful lesson to the legislator taught the people that well as to himself. This is a singular case; his own their help came from GOD, and not from man; and tribe, that of Levi, he left without any earthly posses- that consequently they must repose their confidence sion : and though to minister to God was the most in him alone. But this subject deserves to be more honourable employment, yet the Levites could never distinctly considered, as in the account given of his arise to any political consequence in Israel. Even his death this offence is again brought furth to view. own sons became blended in the common mass of the God himself thus details the circumstances : Levites, and possessed no kind of distinction among thee up into this mountain, and behold the land of their brethren. Though his confidence in God was Canaan—and die in the mount whither thou goest op, ever unshaken, yet he had a life of toil and perpetual and be gathered unto thy people as Aaron thy brother, distress, occasioned by the ignorance, obstinacy, and because ye trespassed against me AMONG THE CHILDREN baseness, of the people over whom he presided ; and of Israel; because ye sanctified me not in the midst he died in their service, leaving no other property but of the children of Israel ;" chap. xxxii. 49–51. his tent behind him. Of the spoils taken in war we “ And Moses went up unto the mountain of Nebo, and never read of the portion of Moses. He had none, he the Lord showed him all the land; and the Lord said wanted none; his treasure was in heaven, and where unto him, This is the land which I sware unto Abrahis treasure was, there also was his heart. By this ham, unto Isaac, and unto Jacob, saying, I will give disinterestedness of Moses two points are fully proved : it unto thy seed: I have caused thee to see it with 1. That he was satisfied, fully so, that his mission was thine eyes, but thou shalt not go over thither: so Moses, Divine, and that in it he served the living God; and the servant of the Lord, died there, according to the 2. That he believed in the immortality of the soul, and word of the Lord; and he buried him ;" chap. xxxiv. the doctrine of future rewards and punishments, and 1-6. In the above extracts, all the circumstances relatherefore he laboured so to pass through things tem- tive to this event are brought into one point of view; poral, that he might not lose the things that are eternal. and we see plainly the stress that is laid on the offence It is strange that the faith of Moses in these points against God. YE TRESPASSED AGAINST ME AMONG THE should be questioned by any who had ever seriously CHILDREN OF ISRAEL-YE SANCTIFIED ME NOT IN THE read the Pentateuch.

MIDST OF THE CHILDREN OF ISRAEL. These words The manner in which he bore the sentence of his may be understood thus : The people of themselves exclusion from the promised inheritance, is an addi- were too much prone to take off their eye from God, tional proof of his persuasion of the reality of the in- consult their senses, and depend upon man; and the

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unetch of the history

DEUTERONOMY.

and character of Moses. manner in which Moses and Aaron performed the true God which the apostle states him to have had ; miracle which God commanded them to do in his and that faith by which he realized spiritual and inviname, was such as to confirm them in the carnality of sible things, and through which he despised all worldly their views, and cause them to depend on an arm of grandeur and secular emolument. * By faith," says flesh. Ye therefore shall not go into the promised the apostle, “ Moses, when he was come to years, reland, said the Lord : and the death of them both was fused to be called the son of Pharaoh's daughter the fullest proof to this people that it was not by might choosing rather to suffer affliction with the people of nor by power, but by the Spirit of the Lord of hosts, God, than to enjoy the pleasures of sin for a season ; that their enemies were expelled, and that themselves esteeming the reproach of Christ greater riches than were introduced and established in the promised in the treasures in Egypt; for he had respect unto the heritance. This seems to be the spirit of the whole recompense of the reward,”. Heb. xi. 24, &c. This business : and as Moses had no other end in view but certainly implies à degree of religious knowledge, asthe glory of God, it must have been a supreme satis-sociated with an experimental acquaintance with Divine faction to his pious soul, that this end was so effectu- things, which we can scarcely ever suppose to have ally promoted, though even at the expense of his life. been at all the result of an Egyptian education. But

1. At a distant view there appears to be very little we shall cease to be pressed with any difficulty here, observable in the death of Moses; but on a nearer ap- ' when we consider the circumstance of his being proproach we shall find it to have been the most honour- videntially nursed by his own mother, under the auable, I might add the most glorious, with which any thority and direction of the Egyptian princess. This human being was ever favoured. As to his death it gave him the privilege of frequent intercourse with his self, it is simply said, He died in the land of Moab— parents, and others of the Hebrews, who worshipped according to the word of the Lord. He was, as has the true God; and from them he undoubtedly learned already been observed, in familiar conversation with all the great truths of that religion which were taught his Maker; and while in the act of viewing the land, and practised among the patriarchs. The circumand receiving the last information relative to it, the stance of his Hebrew origin, his exposure on the Nile, ancient covenant with the patriarchs, and the perform- his being found and adopted by the daughter of Phaance of the covenant in putting their posterity into raoh, were. facts which could not be concealed, and possession of this goodly inheritance, he yielded up must have been notorious at the Egyptian court; and the ghost, and suddenly passed from the verge of the when these points are considered, we need not be surearthly into the heavenly Canaan. Thus, without the prised that he never could be so identified among the labour and the delay of passing through the type, he Egyptians as that his Hebrew extraction shonld be entered at once into the possession of the antitype; forgotten. having simply lost the honour of leading the people a That the person whom God designed to be the delittle farther, whom, with so much care and solicitude, liverer of his people should have been a Hebrew by he had brought thus far.

birth, and have retained all his natural attachment to 2. There is another circumstance in his death which his own people, and yet have been brought up by Pharequires particular notice. It is said, He died-ac- raoh's daughter, and had all the advantages of a highlycording to the word of the Lord: the original words finished education, which the circumstances of his own nin' in Sy al pi Yehovah, signify literally at (or upon) family could not have afforded, is all a master-piece the mouth of Jehovah ; .which Jonathan ben Uzziel in- of wisdom in the designs of the Divine providence. terprets thus : "9N7p's nprus sy al neshikath mey. Besides, Moses by this education must have been well mera dayeya, " by a kiss of the word of Jehovah ;" known, and even popular among the Egyptians; and and this has given rise to an ancient tradition among therefore the subsequent public part he took in behalf the Jews, " that God embraced Moses, and drew his of the Hebrews must have excited the greater attention soul out of his body by a kiss.". The Targumist adds, and procured him the greater respect both among the that this was on the seventh day of the month Adar, Egyptians and his own people. All these circumthe same day of the same month on which he was born.” stances taken together show the manifold wisdom and

3. The last circumstance worthy of note is, that gracious providence of God. God buried him, which is an honour no human being 5. Thus end the life and the work of the writer of ever received besides himself. From the tradition re- the Pentateuch, who, by the treasures of wisdom and ferred to by Saint Jude, ver. 9, it appears that Michael, knowledge which he has amassed in those five books, the archangel, was employed on this occasion ; that has enriched the whole civilized earth, and indeed Satan disputed the matter with him, probably wishing greatly promoted that very civilization. His works, the burial-place of Moses to be known, that it might we may justly say, have been a kind of text-book to become an excitement to superstition and idolatry; almost every writer on geology, geography, chronology, bụt being rebuked by the Lord, he was obliged to give astronomy, natural history, ethics, jurisprudence, poliover the contention; and though the place of burial tical economy, theology, poetry, and criticism, from his was probably the valley of the mounlain on which time to the present day. Books, to which the choicest Moses had been conversing with God, and where he writers and philosophers in pagan antiquity have been died, yet Satan himself could not ascertain the spot, deeply indebted, and which were the text-books to all and no man knoweth of his sepulchre unto this day. the prophets; books from which the flimsy writers

4. It may be asked how Moses, who was bred up against Divine Revelation have derived their natural at an idolatrous court, which he did not quit till the religion, and all their moral excellence; books written fortieth year of his age, got that acquaintance with the in all the energy and purity of the incomparable lanSketch of the History and Character of Moses. guage in which they are composed; and finally, books On the whole we may remark, that when God calls which, for importance of matter, variety of information, any person to an extraordinary work, he so orders it, dignity of sentiment, accuracy of facts, impartiality, sim- in the course of his providence, that he shall have every plicity, and sublimity of narration, tending to improve qualification necessary for that work. This was the and ennoble the intellect, and meliorate the physical case with Moses : his Hebrew extraction, the comeliness and moral condition of man, have never been equalled, of his person, his Egyptian education, his natural firmand can only be paralleled by the Gospel of the Son ness and constancy of character, all concurred with the of God! Fountain of endless' mercy, justice, truth, influences of the Divine Spirit, to make him in every and beneficence! how much are thy gifts and bounties respect such a person, one among millions, who was every neglected by those who do not read this law; and by way qualified for the great work which God had given those who, having read it, are not morally improved by him to do; and who performed it according to the mind it, and made wise unto salvation !

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of his Maker. SERVANT OF GOD, WELL DONE !

847

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GENESIS

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,Vaiyetse ויצא .vii
,Vaiyishlach וישלח .viii

,Vaiyesheb וישב .ix
,Vaiyiggash ויגש .xi
. ,Vayechi ויחי .xii
,Shemoth שמות .xiii

,Vaera וארא .xiv
,Beshalach בשלח .xvi

,Yithro יתרי .xvii

EXODUS.

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.,Terumah תרומה .xix
,Ki thissa כי תשא .xxi
. Valyakhel ויקהל .xxii
,Pekudey פקודי .xxiii
,Vayikra ויקרא .xxiv
,Shemini שמיני .xxvi
. ,Tazria תזריע .xxvii

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A GENERAL VIEW OF ALL THE SECTIONS OF THE LAW, AND OF THE PROPHETS,

As read in the different Jewish Synagogues, for every Sabbath of the Year.
PARESHIOTH, or sections of the Law.

HAPHTAROTH, or sections of the PROPHETS.

Portuguese and Italian Jews. German and Dutch Jeres Sec. i. gonna Bereshith, . i. 1 to ví. 8.

Isa. xlii. 5-21.

Isa. xlii. 5-25 ; xhü. 10. ü. 77737 Toledoth noach,vi. 9 to xi. 32. Isa. liv. 1-10.

Isa. liv. 1-17; lv. 1-5.
72 73 Lech lecha,
xii. 1 to xvii. 27.. Isa. xl. 27-31 ; xli. 1-16.

Ditto.
iv. A Vaiyera,
xviii. 1 to xxii. 24. 2 Kings iv. 1-23.

2 Kings iv. 1-37.
V: 109 Chaiyey Sarah, xxiii. 1 to xxv. 18. 1 Kings i. 1-31.

Ditto. vi. 6737n Toledoth, xxv. 19 to xxviii. 9. . Mal. 1. 1-14; ii. 1-7.

Ditto. . , xxviii. 10 to xxxii. 3. Hos. xi. 7-12; xii. 1-11.

Ditto. . , xxxii. 4 to xxxvi. 43. Obad. i. 1-21.

Hos. xii. 12-14; xiii. 1-16 . , Xxxvii. 1 to xl. 23. Amos ii. 1-16 ; iii. 1-3.

Ditto.
von Mikkets, .
xli. I to xliv. 17. 1 Kings ii. 15–28 ; iv. 1.

Ditto.
. , xliv. 18 to xlvii. 27. Ezek. xxxvii. 15–28.

Ditto. . , . xlvii. 28 to 1. 26. 1 Kings ii. 1-12.

Ditto. . , i. I to vi. 1.

Jer. i. 1-19; ii. 1-3.

Isa. xxvii, 6 to axir. 23. . ,

vi. 2 to ix. 35. Ezek. xxviii. 25 to xxix. 21. Ditto. xv. nynp A x Bo el paroh, x. 1 to xiii. 16. Jer. xlvi. 13-28. .

Ditto. . , xü. 17 to xvii. 16. Judg. v. 1-31.

Judg. iv. 4 to v. 1-31. . , xviij. I to xx. 26. Isa. vi. 1-13..

Isa. vi. 1-13; vii. 1-6;

ix. 6 7. xviii

. Dhubua Mishpatim,. xxi. 1 to xxiv. 18. Jer. xxxiv. 8-22 & xxxiii. 25, 26. Ditto. xix. , xxv. 1 to xxvii. 19. 1 Kings v. 12–18; vi. 1-13. Ditto. XX. 773n Tetsavveh, xxvii. 20 to xxx. 10. Ezek. xliii. 10–27.

Ditto. . , xxx. 11 to xxxiv. 35. Kings xviii. 20-39.

1 Kings xvii. 1-39. . . xxxv. 1 to xxxviii. 20. 1 Kings vii. 13–26.

1 Kings vii. 40–50. . , xxxviii. 21 to xl. 38. 1 Kings vii. 40–50.

1 Kings viii. 51; vi. 1-21. . , i. 1 to vi. 7.

Isa. xliii. 21-28 ; xliv. 1-25.. Ditto. xxv. '12977 Vaiyikra Tsav, vi. 8 to viii. 36. Jer. vii. 21-34; vii. 1-3; ix. 23, 24. Ditto. . , ix. 1 to xi. 47. 2 Sam. vi. 1-19. .

2 Sam. vi. 1-23; vii. 1-17. .

xi. I to xii. 59. 2 Kings iv. 42-44; v. 1-19. Ditto. xxviii. 92r. Metsora, xiv. I to xv. 33. 2 Kings vii. 3–20.

Ditto.
xxix. 672 ng Acharey Moth,xvi. I to xviii. 30. Amos ix. 7-15.

Ezek. xxii. 1-19.
XXX. . ,
xix. 1 to xx. 27. . Ezek. xx. 2-20.

Amos ix. 7-15.
xxxi. 28 Einor,
xxi. I to xxiv. 23. Ezek. xliv. 15–31.

Ditto.
xxxii. yo noa Behar Sinai, xxv. 1 to xxvi. 2. Jer. xxxii. 6-27.

Ditto. xxiii. opna Bechukkothai, xxvi. 3 to xxvii. 34.. Jer. xvi. 19-21 ; xvii. 1-14. Ditto. xxxiv. 43777 Bemidbar,. i. 1 to iv. 20.. Hos. i. 10, 11; ü. 1-20.

Ditto.
xxxv. Aus Naso,
iv. 21 to vii..89. Judg. xiii. 2-25.

Ditto.
Xxxvi. 7839na Behaalothecha, viii. 1 to xii. 16. Zech. ii. 10–13; iii

. 1-13 ; iv. 1-7. Ditto. xxxvii. 4370 Shelach, xüi. I to xv. 41. Josh ii. 1-24.

Ditto. xxxviii . Hap Korach,

xvi. 1 to xviii. 32. 1 Sam. xi. 14, 15; xii. 1-22.. Ditto. Xxxix. Chukkath, xix. 1 to xxii. 1. . Judg. xi. 1-33.

Ditto.
xl.
3 Balak, .
xxi. 2 to xxv. 9. Micah v. 7-15; vi. 1-8.

Ditto.
. , xxv. 10 to xxx. 1. . 1 Kings xx. 46 ; xix. 1-21. Ditto.
xlii. nina Mattoth,. xxx. 2 to xxxii. 42. . Jer. i. 1-19; ii. 1-3.

Ditto.
. ,
xxxi. 1 to xxxvi. 13. Jer. ii. 4–28; iv. 1, 2.

Jer. ii. 4–28; üz. 4. . , i, 1 to iii. 22. Isa. i. 1-27.

Ditto.
, iii. 23 to vii. 11.
xl. 1-26.

Ditto.
xlvi. 3p9 Ekeb,

vii. 12 to xi. 25.
xlix. 14-26; 1. 1-3.

Ditto.
xlvi.

xi. 26 to xvi. 17.
liv. 11-17; lv. 1-5.

Ditto.
xlviii
. Sub Shophetim, xvi. 18 to xxi. 9.

li. 12-23; lii. 1-12.

Ditto.
xlix. Ayn Tetse,
xxi. 10 to xxv. 19. liv. 1-10..

Ditto.
,
xxvi. I to xxix. 8. Ix. 1-22.

Ditto.
. , xxix. 9 to xxx. 20. Ixi. 10, 11 ; Ixii. 1-12; Ixiï. 1-9. Ditto.

xxxi. 1 to xxxi. 30. . Hos. xiv. 1-9; Micah vii. 18-20. Isa. lv. 6–13; lvi. 1-8. ,

xxxii. I to xxxii. 52. 2 Sam. xxii. 1-51. Some say Hos. xiv. 1-9; Joel ü. .

Ezek. xvii. 22–24 ; xvii. 1-32. 1-27. berachah,

xxxiii. 1 to xxxiv. 12. Josh. i. 1–18; Eccles. i.- xii. inclusive. Ditto. In the above chapters and verses I have, in general, followed the others. It was from this custom of the Jews, that the primitive Chris. divisions in the best Masoretic Bibles, from which our common Eng- tians adopted

theirs of reading a lesson every Sabbath out of the old lish Bibles will in some cases be found to differ a little.

and New Testaments; and on this custom the practice of the Church In the synagogues the law is read entirely through in the fifty Sab- in our own country, in reading certain portions of the epistles and baths of their lunar year; for they join certain sections together, which Gospels every Sunday in the year was founded. are noticed at the end of the tables. But in their intercalated years, As a proper knowledge of these Haphtaras or prophetical sections in which they add a month, they have then fifty-four Sabbaths, and may sometimes help to fix the chronology of some events in the New this is one reason why we find fifty-four Pareshahs, and fifty-four Testament, it hath been deemed proper to give a table of them in conHaphtaras, instead of fifty-two. See the concluding tables.

nection with the Pareshioth or sections of the law, in the place of which It has already been observed that when Antiochus Epiphanes con- they were originally read; and with which, ever since the days of the quered the Jews, about the year 168 before the Christian era, he for- Asmoncans or Maccabees, they continue to be read in the various bade the law to be publicly read in the synagogues, on pain of death. synagogues belonging to the English, Portuguese, Italian, Dutch, and The Jews, that they might not be wholly deprived of the word of God, German Jews. selected from other parts of the sacred writings fifty-four portions, From the above tables the reader will perceive that though the Jews which were termed HAPHTARAS, 770DN haphtaroth, from 9 are agreed in the sections of the law that are read every Sabbath, yet patar, he dismissed, let loose,

opened--for Though the Law was dis- they are not agreed in the Haphtaras or sections from the prophets ; missed from their synagogues, and was closed to them by the edict of as it appears above, that the Dutch and German Jews differ in several this persecuting king,

yet the prophetic writings, not being under the cases from the Italian and Portuguese ; and there are some slighter interdict, were left open, and therefore they used them in place of the variations besides those above, which I have not noticed

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חקת ,Pinechas פינחס .xli

,Masey מסעי .xliii

,Debarim דברים .xliv ,Vaethchannan ואתחנן xl

.

,Tabo תבוא .1 ,Nitstsabim נָצברם .li

,Vaiyelech וילך lin

,Haazinu האזינו .li -Vezoth Hab וזאת הברכה .liv

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Through the course of thirteen Lunar Cycles, (which embrace every possible variation,) the day of the week with which the Jewish year begins, and on which the Passover is

held; as also the length of the months Marchesvan and Cisleu.

CYCLE CCXCIV.

CYCLE CCXCV.

CYCLE CCXCVI..

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Usheri-Rabbin

Year
Usheri- Rabbin-

Year an year ical year Year or of the

Index.
an year ical year Year of of the

Index.
of the
of the Christ. lunar

of the of the Christ. lunar world. world.

cycle.
world. World.

cycle. 5831 5587 1827

12 P 5 5850 5606 1846 15 d 7 5832 5588 1828 2 7 P 3 5851 5607 1647 2 2 P5 5833 3589 1829 E 35 D 1 5852 5608 1648 E 37 D 3 5834 5590 1830 4 3 d 5 5853 5609 1849 45 P1 5835 5591 1831

57 P 3 5854 5610 1850 5 3 d 5 5836 5592 1832 E 6 5 D 1 5855 5611 1851 E 6 7 P5 5837 5593 1833 73 d 5 5836 5612 1832 7 7 D 1 5838 5594 1834 E 87 P5 5857 5613 1853 E 8 3 d 7 5839 5395 1835 97 P3 5858 5614 1834 92 P 5 5840 5596 1836

10 5 d 7 3839 5615 1855 107 P 3 5841 5597 1837 E 11 2 D 5 5860 5616 1856 E 11 5 D 1 5842 5598 1838 127 P 3 5861 5617 1857 12 3 d 5 5843 5599

1839

135 d 7 5862 5618 1858 13 7 P 3 5844 5600 1840 E14 12 P 7 5863 5619 1859 E 14 5 P 3 5845 5601 1841 152 D 3 5864 5620 1860 15 5 d 7 5846 5602 1842 16 5 d 7 5865

5621 1861 16 2 D 3 5847 5603 1843 E 17 2 P 7 6866 5622 1862 E 175 P3 5848

5604 1844 18 2 P 5 5567 5623 1863 18 5d 7 5849 5605 1845 E 197 D 5868 5624 1864 19 2 D 5

CYCLE CCXCVII.

CYCLE CCXCVIII.

CYCLE CCXCIX.

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Usheri- Rabbin

Year
Usheri- Rabbin-

Year
an yearsical year Year of of the

Index.
an year ical year Year of of the

Index.
of the of the Christ. lunar

of the of the Christ. lunar
world. world.

cycle.
world. world.

cycle.
5869 5625 1865 17 P 3 5888 5644 1884 13 d 5
3870 5626 1866

25 d 7 5889 5645 1895 27 P 3
5871

5627 1867 E 32 P7 5890 5646 1886 E 35 P 3 5872 5628 1969 42 D3 5891 5047 1987 4 5 d 7 3873 5629

1869

5 5 P) 5892 5648 1888 52 D 3 5874 5630 1870 E 63 d 7

5893

5649 1889 E 6 5 P 3
3875
5631 1871
7 2 P 5 3894
5650 1890

5 d 7
5876 5032 1872 E87 D 3 5895 5051 1891 E 8 2 D 5
5877 5633 1873 95 d 7

5896 5652 1892 97 P 3
5878 5634 1874 102 P5

5897
5653

1893 10 5 d 7
5879 5635 1875 E 11 7 D 3 5898 5654 1894 E11 2 P7
3880 5636 1876 125 PI 5899 5655 1895 122 D 3
5881 5637 1877 133 d 5 5900 5656 1896 13 5 PI
5882 5638 1878

E 147 P5 5901 5657 1897 E 14 3 d 7 3883 5639 1879 157 P 3 5902 3658

1898

15 2 P 5 5884 5640 1880 16 5 d 7 5903 5659 1899 16 7 D 1 5885 5641 1891

E 17 2 D5 5904 3600 1900 E 17 3d 5886 5642 1882 18 7 P 3 5905 5661

1901

18 2 P 5 3887 5643 1883 E 19 15 DI 5906 5662 1902 E 19 7 P 5

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Usheri-Rabbin

Year
Usheri- Rabbin-

Year
Usheri- Rabbin-

Year
an year ical year Year of of the

Index.
an year ical year Year of of the

an yearsical year Year of of the Index.

Index. of the of the Christ. lunar

of the Christ. lunar of the

of the of the Christ. lunar
world. world.

cycle.
world. world.

cycle.
world.world.

cycle.
5926
5682 1922
12 P5 5945 5701 1941 15 d 7 5964 5720 1960

1 7 P 3 5927 5683 1923 2 2 17 D1 5946

5702
1942
2 2 P 5 5963 5721 1961

2.5 d 7
5928 5684 1924 E 33 d 7 5947 5703 1943 E 3 7 D3 5966 5722 1962 E 32 D 5
5929
5685 1925 4 2 P 5 5948 5704 1944

4 5 d 7 5967 5723 1963 47 P 3 5930 5686 1926 57 P 3 5949 5705

1945 5 2 P 5 5968 5724 1964 5 5 d 7 5931 5687 1927 E 65 D 1 5950 5706 1946 E 6 7 D 3 5969 5725 1965 E 6 P 7 5932 5088 1928

73 d 5 5951

5707 1947 75 P1 3970 5726 1966 7 12 D 3 3933 5689 1929 E 87 P5 5952

5708 1948 E 8 3 d 7 5971 5727 1907 E 8 5 P 3 5934 5690 1930 9 {7 ᎠᏗ 5953 5709 1949

2 P 5 5972 5728

1968

9 5 d 7 5935 5691 1931 103 d 5 5954 5710 1950 107 D1 5973 5729 1969 102 5936 3692 1932 E 11 7 P5 5955 5711 1951 E11 3 0 7 5974 5730 1970 E 11 7 D3 5937 5693 1933 127 P 3 5956 5712 1952 122 P 5 5975

5731 1971 125 d 7 5939 5694 1934 13 5 d 7 5957 5713 1953 137 P 3

597 5732

1972 13 2 P5 5939 3695 1935 E 14 2 D5 5958 5714 1954 E 14 5 D1 3977

5733 1973 E 14 7 D 3 5940 3696 1936 157 P 3 5959

5715 1955 153 d 5 5978 5734 1974 15 5 P1 5941 5697 1937 16 5 d 7 5960 5716 1956 1817 P 3 5979

5735 1975

16 3 d 5 5942 5698 1938 E 17 2 P 7 5961 5717 1957 E 17 5 P 3 5980 5736 1976 E 17 7 P5 5943 5099 1939 18 2 D 3 5962

5718

1959 18 5 à 7 5981 5737 1977 18 7 D 1 5944 5700 1940 E 19 5 P 3 5963 5719 1969 E 192 D 3 5982 5738 1978 E 19 3 d 7

VOL. I.

( 55 )

849

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