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EUROPEAN MAGAZINE,

AND

LONDON REVIEW,

FOR JULY, 1817.

A BRIEF MEMOIR OF

MR. WILLIAM BLANCHARD,

OF THE TILEATRE ROYAL, COVENT-GARDEN.

WITH A PORTRAIT, ExgrAVED BY HENRY COOK, FROM AN ORIGINAL PAINTING.)

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits, and their entrances,
And each man in his time plays many parts.

SAAKSPEARE.

THE

THE correctness of this celebrated by whom he was brought up, and inte

axiom is so palpably manifest, structed in his business.-At the age of as to require neither ihe aid of elo- seventeen, and in the year 1786, he left quence nor of argument to evidence bis home, for the profession of an its truth. Every passing circumstance, actor, and joined a company of comeevery event in lite, from the first rest- dians at Buxton, in Derbyshire, then lessness of infancy cradled " in its under the management of a 'Ms. Welsh. nurse's arms," to the last decrepitude He there made his first appearance, of extreme old age, oppressed with under the assumed name of Bentley, “ second childishness and mere obli- in the part of Allen-a-Dale, in the comic vion," brings with it this lesson, and opera of Robin Hood, when the readds one or her proof of the justness ception he experienced was so highly of the simile. Nor are the characters flattering, as at once determined him of real life less various, or less dise to adhere to the theatre, and abjure tinguished, than are the imaginary per- the printing-office. Meeling with uni"sonages of the Drama, where Fiction form encouragement, he was, however,

Ilolds as it were the mirror up to Nature, induced, after the lapse of a year or Shews vice tier own inage,

two, to re-assume his family name Virtue her own feature,

of Blanchard, and, strange to relate And the very age and body of the time to those who now know him, soon took Its forin and pressure."

the lead in the heroic walks of the A contemplation of the stage natu- Drama, as the representative of Romeo, rally induces a reference to those. by Barnwell, Young Norval, and other the exertion of whose professional ta- parts of a similar description. lent the drama is upheld and pro Elevated with success, he soon after. moted ; and amongst whom the ori. wards became a Manager, and opened ginal of our present Portrait is par: theatres on his own account at Penrith, ticularly distinguished.

in Cumberland ; Hexham, in Northum

berland; and Barnard Castle,and Bishop's WILLIAM BLANCHARD, the sub. Auckland, in Durham. These schemes ject of this brief sketch, was born at were, however, speedily relinquished, York in the year 1769; in which city as their result was little else than trou. bis uncle was an eminent printer, and ble, anxiety, and disappointment. proprietor of the York Chronicle, aud ļu the year 1793, he was engaged by

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Il William Blanchard Theatre Royal Corent (gaurden engraved by Henry Crock!

1.690, le-well Street, Jule oy: 1.3./umming-Meer.. Tentonville,

EUROPEAN MAGAZINE,

AND

LONDON REVIEW,

FOR JULY, 1817.

A BRIEF MEMOIR OF
MR. WILLIAM BLANCHARD,

OF TIE TLEATRE ROYAL, COVENT-GARDEN. (FITB A PORTRAIT, ENGRAVED BY HENRY COOK, FROM AN original PAINTING.]

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits, and their entrances,
And each man in his time plays many parts.

SAAKSPEARE.
THE
TVE correctness of this celebrated by whom he was brought up, and in-

axiom is so palpably manifest, structed in his business.-At the age of as to require neither ihe aid of elo- seventeen, and in the year 1786, he left quence nor of argument to evidence bis home, for the profession of an its truth. Every passing circumstance, actor, and joined a company of comeevery event in life, from the first rest- dians at Buxton, in Derbyshire, then lessness of infancy cradled“ in its under the management of a Mr. Welsh. nurse's arms," to the last decrepitude He there made his first appearance, of extreme old age, oppressed with under the assinied name of Bentley, " second childishness and mere obli- in the part of Allen-a-Dale, in the comic vion," brings with it ibis lesson, and opera of Robin Hood, when the readds one other proof of the justness ception he experienced was so bighly of the simile. Nor are the characters faitering, as at once determined him of real life less various, or less dis. to adhere to the theatre, and abjure tinguished, than are the imaginary per- the printing-office. Meeling with uni'sonages of the Drama, where Fiction form encouragenient, he was, however,

Holds as it were the mirror up to Nature, induced, after the lapse of a year or Shews vice her own image,

two, to re-assume his family name Virtue her own feature,

of Blanchard, and, strange to relate And the very age and body of the time to those who now know him, soon took Its forin and pressure."

the lead in the heroic walks of the A contemplation of the stage natu. Drama, as the representative of Romeo, rally induces a reference to those. by Barnwell, Young Norval, and other the exertion of whose professional ta- parts of a similar description. lent the drama is upheld and pro Elevated with success, he soon after. moted ; and amongst whom the ori. wards became a Manager, and opened ginal of our present Portrait is par. theatres on his own account at Penrith, ticularly distinguished.

in Cumberland ; Hexham, in Northum

berland; and Barnard Castle,and Bishop's WILLIAM BLANCHARD, the suh. Auckland, in Durham. These schemes ject of this brief sketch, was born at were, however, speedily relinquished, York in the year 1769; in which city as their result was little else than troubis uncle was an eminent printer, and ble, anxiety, and disappointmeal. proprietor of the York Chronicle, and

fu the year 1793, he was engaged by

Mr. Brunton, of Norwich, where he &c. in which we have seen Mr. Brashad an ample scope for the exercise of chard with great satisfaction, and which bis talents in almost every varied range induce us to consider him a valuable of the Drama. In particular, his per acquisition to a London stage. formance of rustic characters, old men, A correct mediocrity has one emi. smart servants, sailors, &c. procured nept advantage over the most extra. him considerable applause, and ren vagant humour; it entities ils posses. dered hiin an established favourite sor to more personal respect; and throughout that circuit. His growing however the general lives of actors reputation attracted the potice of the inay have reduced this respect, or the Covent-garden managers, and he was talents of certain performers may bave immediately engaged for five years, coin rendered it less necessary, it really wencing with the season of 1800-1. gains more for him than the inajority

Mr. Blanchard accordingly made his of his contemporaries may be, perdebut on the metropolitan stage on the haps, willing to inagine. It is always Ist of Oclober in the former year, in the pleasing, therefore, to sec a Performer, character of Acres, in the Rivals, and who, with considerable powers of bufthat of Cruck, in the musical entertain. fuonery, can so far respect himself, bis inent of the Turnpike Gate; in both of author, and his audience, as to keep his wbich parts ho acquitl, bipself 10 spirits within just bounds, and be rather the universal satisfaction of the au proud of copying nature than vain dience.

enough to remind us only and eterThe variety of characters which he nally of himself. For this reason, the has since assumed, in play, farce, and unassuming and unaffected nature of opera, enables us now to speak more Mr. Blanchard is always welcome to at large as to his professional exer the judicious. tions; and we select his delineation The performance which has chiefly of the Marquis de Grund Chateau, in fixed his popularity, is the character the Cabinet, as entitled to our most already noticed in the opera of the unqualified approbation. He enters Cabinet, in which he certainly presents with the utmost skill into every linea a very amusing picture of a stiff dotard, ment of the old beau, and pourtrays with his affectation of euergelic dig. bis peculiarities with the picest discri- nity and pompous gallantry, which is mination and the purest taste. It must so well contrasied with the ludicrous be evident, that no parts try the strength position of his figure. This performof an actor's genius so much as those of ance, indeed, is so truly original, that SHAKSPEARE ; and it is possible for a his successors in the part have been Performer to get public credit in sus able to add nothing new to its repretaining many noderu characters, with sentation ; and with every requisite vui being able to do common justice to allowance for first impressions, they certhe labours of our immortal Bard: tainly are all the less amusing in proMr. Blanchard has, however, the abi- portion as they either advance or relity to decorate the beauties of the cede fron the style of Mr. Blanchard. Poet with Nature's colours, and bis We have only now to police Mr. personification of Fluellen, in Henry B. in private life, where we are most ine Fifth, ever calls forth those re. happy to bear testimony to those many iterated plaudits of a London audience estimable qualities, boih of head and may be considered a sanction to our heart, which have secured to him the opinion. It must, indeed, be pro- deserved respect of all those, whose nounced throughout an excellent per- intercourse has enabled them to apformance. His Pistol, in the second preciate his many claims to their part of Henry the Fourth, is also given friendship and regard. Mr. Blanchard's in warm and animated tints, bui free conduct off the stage, as well as on, from caricature and extravagance. das always entitled him to participate jlungo, in the musical entertainment in that esteem which is ever accorded of the Padlock, he plays with great to public talent when joined to private liumour, and sings bis songs with the virtue. best possiile etrect. There are also a Mr. B. has, we believe, been twice variety of other characters, as Mene. married, and has at present five children nins, l'olonius, Filbure, Sir Hugh Evans, living.

T, Sir Androre tgue-theeli, Il poisil, &.

OPERA-HOUSE

AND

FRONTISPIECE.

1789, and the present theatre erected COLONNADE, on the same spot in 1790. WATERLOO-PLACE, PALL-MALL.

With respect to the more distant ob. (WITH AN ENGRAVING.] jects in our Engraving, the name of A of “ Waterloo Place" has been given

metropolis, the subject of our to the opening in front of Carlton present FRONTISPIEce is peculiarly dis. House, appearing in the Plate beyond tinguished as combining elegance of the Opera House Colonnade. The design with utility of improvement. buildings here, however, are unfortuThe unfjoished exterior of the front of wately stuccoed, instead of being cased the Opera House towards the Hay with stone, and are already of the market bas beco, indeed, too long an shades between white and black, the object of regret ; but which regret is smoky and the dirty grey. Whether destined, we would now hope, at no that side of Pall Mall shall be a good distal period, to be entirely removed thoroughfare, most depend upon the by the speedy completion of what has future mode of paving.' To afford already beco so efficiently commenced. safety to pedestrians, it has been pro

The present alteration consists of a posed, that the foot pavement should row of spacious houses erected at the be so constructed as to leave a space stage end of the Theatre, in front of for carriages not wider than the breadth which is an elegant Colonnade, sup. of Pall-Mall

, and that to distinguish ported by hollow pillars of cast iron, between the two pavements, lamps and lighted with gas.

should be placed on stone pedestals, As the Opera House itself, however, in situations sufficiently prominent and has never been finished according to the elevated to mark the distinction. Feetdesigris of the Architect, it can only ing as we do, however, in common with be said, that, with respect to its inte all who boast the birthright of our rior, it is one of the finest Theatres in country, a pride of soul, and a reEurope. The present form of the vercoce of admiration, elicited by the boxes, and their ornamental beauties, mention even of the name of Waterloo embody the most lively images of scenic – we could have wished that the pile of grandeur and magnificence; their fronts buildings destined to bear the appellaare painted in compartments, on a blue tion of that unequalled triumph, had ground, with broad gold frames, and been more worthy of the honour thus ibeir ornaments exhibit festoons and conferred, and that the structures had Wreaths of flowers, sostained by Cupids, been, both iu design and in completion, leopards, lions, gryphons, and other every way more deserving of their desfabulous creations. The dome repre tined fame, by appearing likely to transsents a sky, in which a flame-colour mit that fame to posterity. prevails, and the coup d'ail of the whole is rich without heaviness. The mea MR. EDITOR, surement of the audience part of the N the several books called the To.

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sions of the great theatre at Milan; the many questions proposed, with the an. stage being sixly feet in length from swers to them, for the exercise of the the back to the orchestra, eighty in student; but there are several amongst breadth from wall to wall, and forly- them which cannot be solved by any six feet across from box to box: the rule which those books contain. pit will hold eight hundred persons; I am, therefore, desirous, through the aud each box in the five tiers is so medium of your Magazine, to see somo constructed as to contain six, all of general rule, by which all questions whon command a good view of the relating to something done or per. stage. The gallery, containing seven formed in time by the help or two or teen bencbes, will hold eight hundred more agents may be answered. persons, and has behind a lobby for By proposing, therefore, the following refreshments. This theatre usually case, when you have room forit, perhaps opens for the season in January, and some of your learned Correspondents continues its representations on the may be inclined to favour me with the Tuesday and Saturday (and occasion. investigation of a role to perform it bs. ally Thursday) of every week, until I bought three artillery horses, Dob. Jaly or August The Italian Opera bin, Jolly, and Purch, for 2001.--DobHouse on this site was first opened in bin could draw a piece of ordnance frona Lbc year 1704, was destroyed by jism in Woolwich to the Tower in 10 hours ;

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