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CONTENTS.

Page

Page

List of East India Shipping..........381*

LONDON REVIEW

Particulars of the Accouchement and Ellis's Journal of the Proceedings of

Decease of Her Royal Highness the the late Embassy to China (Conti-

Princess Charlotte.

.383* nued]

Memoir of the Rev. William Bengo Cox's Female Scripture Biography....446

Collyer, D.D.

. 407 Feldborg's History of Norway ..448

The Last Legend of Lampidosa ......411 POETRY...

.449

Topographical Description of the Pa The Bride's Dirge

ib.

rish of Illogan, Cornwall; including A Funereal Wreath..

.450

some Remarks on Mining

.417 Claremont...

.451

Dr. Carey on Greek Patronymics ...422

Elegiac Stanzas on the Death of Her
FRAGMENTA: Being Thoughts, Obser-

Royal Highness the Princess Char.
vations, Reflections, and Criticisms,

lotte

.452
with Anecdotes and Characters, An A Bridal Elegy

ib.
cient and Modern. No. XXII........423 THEATRICAL JOURNAL : The Falls 4

Biographical Memoir of Charles Aldis, of Clyde-Mr. Robinson-Monody

Esq.

.425

to the Memory of the Princess Char.

Reasoning from Analogy

lotte-Mr, Isaacs-The Father and

THE LITERARY GARDEN, No. XXIX...428 his Children Mr. Denning A

Tate's Method of computing Simple Friend Indeed— Address on Closing

Interest

.430 the Surrey Theatre, &c. &c. ..458

The Canine Patriot

.431 Intelligence from the London Gazette 459

The Hive. No, XXXV.

ib, Abstract of Foreign and Domestic In-

On Melancholy

ib. "telligence...

.463

Falsehood

ib. University Intelligence

.466

On Pride

432 Preferments

.467

Self-Consequence
ib. Births

ib.

Superstition

ib. Marriages-Monthly Obituary 468

Select Sentences

ib.

Literary Intelligence.

.469

Copy of a Bill drawn by Mr. J. B. List of New Publications

ib.

Wienholt, and indorsed by Mr. W. Acknowledgments to Correspondents..470

Thomas

..433

List of Bankrupts, Dividends, and Cer-

Letter to Mr. Phillips, Editor of the tificates ....

ib.

Caermarthen Journal

ib. Dissolutions of Partnership

.474

BIOGRAPHICAL REGISTER OF EMINENT List of Patents.

.476

PERSONS RECENTLY DECEASED, No. State of the Weather

ib.

XXIV.

ib. London Markets

.476-478

Mr. Raymond

ib, Average Prices of Sugar

ib.

The Hon. Henry Erskine ..435 Prices of Canal, &c. Shares

.479

History of Peter Pliant (Continued] ..439 Rates of Government Life Annuities .. ib.
THE REPOSITORY. No. XLY.

.441 Course of Exchange-Prices of Bullion ib.

Succession to the Throne

ib. Price of Stocks

...480

London:

PRINTED FOR JAMES ASPERNE,
AT TIE BIBLE, CROWN, AND CONSTITUTION,

NO. 32, CORNHILL.
AND MAY BE HAD OP ALL THE BOOKSELLERS IN THE UNITED KINGDOM.

Europ. Mag. Vol. LXXII. Nov. 1817.

[graphic]

SEASON, 1817--18.

EAST INDIA SHIPS,
With their Managing Owners, Commanders, Principal Oficers, Surgeons, Pursers, Time of coming afloat, &c)

3th November, 1817.

THE

EUROPEAN MAGAZINE,

AND

LONDON REVIEW,

FOR NOVEMBER, 1817.

ACCOUCHEMENT AND DECEASE OF HER ROYAL HIGHNESS THE

Princess Charlotte.

ALL ANGEL NOW !-YET LITTLE LESS THAN ALL,

WRILE YET A PILGRIM IN OUR WORLD BELOW!
WHAT 'PAILS IT US THAT SWEETNESS TO RECALL,

WRICH HID ITS OWN TO SOOTHE ALL OTHER WOE ;
WHAT 'YAILS TO TELL, AO VIRTUE's PUREST GLOW

SHONE YET MORE LOVELY IN A FORM SO PAIR :
AND LEAST OF ALL,--WHAT 'VAILS THE WORLD SHOULD KNOW,

THAT THIS POOR GARLAND, 'TWINED TO DECK THY BAIR,
IS LUNG UPON THY HEARSE, TO DROOP AND WITHER THERE !

Wulalter Scott,

THE
VHE PRINCESS CHARLOTTE IS NO MORE!—" How many sorrows crowd

into these few brief words !"—How many dearly-cherished hopes and expectations do they annibilate for ever! -Torn from the world in the bloom of life, of enjoyment, and of prosperity, Her awful bereavement has affected us like the tremendous convulsion of an earthquake, or the sudden visitation of an overwhelming darkness.—It is with feelings of acute sorrow, to wbich our remembrance furnishes no parallel, that we enter upon the melancholy and unexpected duty of recording its particulars, and of announcing an event, which has absorbed every other solicitude, and rendered light every other grief.-An event which has removed from us a Princess who was truly the “ expectancy and rose of our fair state,”—but of whom, alas! nothing now remains but a sad reminiscence, and a bitter regret. It is our painful task to narrate an occurrence, as afflictive as is recorded in the annals of hereditary Monarchies,-the deaths of the only two presumptive heirs to the Crown in direct succession, the Mother and her child : The circumstances of whose dissolution are as affecting to private feelings, as the event itself may be esteemed publicly calamitous; for if there is an occasion on which the infliction of the universal doom excites peculiar sorrow, it is that

wherein the more tender sex is alone exposed to pain and hazard; and if there is a station to wbich man might wish to be born, for the purpose of promoting the happiness of his fellow-creatures, it is that of the constitu. tional Sovereign of the British Empire. Under these circumstances we have lost a Prince, just before he saw the light, and a Princess in the prime of youth, and at the height of happiness.-A Princess, who was indeed beloved for every estimable virtue which could endear her to the British People, and who, now the graye has closed over her remains, is deplored with grief as unaffected as it is general. The blow has fallen too, at a moment when we were least prepared to meet its vengeance, and when she was about to add a new, and a more eàdearing claim to our attachment.--Her Royal Highness has been snatched from us, at an hour when the fond and eager anticipations of anxious loyalty were hailing her, the Mother of “ a line of Kings,” were picturing her the future Sovereign of a people who loved, admired, and reverenced her. Those prospects, the inscrutable decrees of Heaven have rendered vain, and the ardency of disappointed hope serves now but to embitter present calamity. It has brought to us one other awful lesson of the insecurity of all human bliss, and the instability of all earthly greatness; it has proclaimed, that in the grave the Sovereign and the subject are alike undistinguished, and that rank, wealth, and happiness, are equally defenceless against the dire advances of Life's last foe. Like a blossom which expands but to give promise of its future loveliness, the lone bud has been severed from its native stem, and while the Parent root yet flourishes in strength and vigour, its opening leaves are withered by the passing blast, and every fond anticipation lies buried in the grave that hides its beauty. We have not only to mourn the loss of Her Royal Highness as our future Queen,-as the depositary of a Nation's hopes, and prayers, and affections,—as the presumptive heiress of a Realm in which she should sustain all the glory of her departed ancestors but we have also to lament the wreck of all those fondly cherished expectations, with which we were prepared to congralulate her fulfilment of a Nation's dearest wisbes, in becoming the living mother of a living child. - How dreadful now is the reverse!

“ All things which we ordained festival,

Turn from their office to black funeral ;
Our solemn hymns to sullen dirges change,
Our bridal flowers serve for a buried corse,
And all things change them to the contrary !"

On Her Royal Highness the hopes of the Nation had for many years fondly rested, and the shock has come upon us like one of those awful convulsions of Nature, where no warning voice is heard, uptil all around is ruin, and desolation, and death. Even yet, the fatltering thought of its impossibility will sometimes start upon our listless moments, as if it were a dream too horrible for memory,--but again the sad reality returns, in all its distressing certainty of waking truth, and forces oor conviction. The Princess was indeed an Englishwoman! and possessed a mind influenced by more than feminine firmness, and an beart whắch

had abundantly profited by the instructions of her early youth. Had it pleased Providence she should ascend the British Throne, she would bave brought to it the true spirit of an English Queen.- Proud of her Country, she respected its manners,--she admired its Constitution,mand she venerated its Religion. Warmth and openness of heart marked her conduct through life; and when she found herself blessed with the husband of her choice,-when she found that choice justified by his virtues, she more than once declared herself the happiest woman in the kingdom That happiness is past ; but we may confidently trust, that her mortal coronet, lined with thorns, dimmed by infirmity, and dislodged by death, is now exchanged for a diadem which shall know no change for ever and for ever !

Before entering upon the more interesting particulars of our painful task, it will be necessary to preface the melancholy detail by a concise account of the previous circumstances. Every thing indeed connected with the distressing subject, must excite a peculiar interest, and be read with peculiar feeling: for, all that remains of our once lovely Princess is now a breathless

corpse. About midnight between Monday and Tuesday, the 3d and 4th of November, Her Royal Highness feeling herself more seriously indisposed, and Sir RICHARD Cropt having pronounced that there were symptoms of the approaching accouchement, expresses were instantly despatched for the various Privy Councillors who were to be present at the birth. The first who arrived was Earl BATHURST from Putney, who reached Esber at a quarter past five. Viscount Sidmouth followed from Richmond Park, at a quarter before sis. The Archbishop of Canterbury, and the Bishop of London, arrived together from Fulham Palace at six. The Chancellor of the Exchequer from Downing.street, and the Lord Chancellor from Bedford-square, also reached Claremont before eight ; and Dr. Baillie from Virginia Waters, arrived about a quarter past seven,

During the whole of Tuesday, the labour advanced slowly, but without the least appearance of danger; and the Princess continued to evince the greatest firmness, and the utinost resignation to her protracted sufferings.

as the labour still lingered, it was deemed advisable to send for the celebrated Doctor Sums, who arrived in the middle of the night, but who saw no reason to depart from the course already pursued ; and thought that the labour would speedily have a happy termination. The symptoms were still favourable, though proceeding too slowly ; and the excellent constitution of Her Royal Highness gave every assurance that she would not be too much exhausted by the delay. No language, no panegyric, can be too warm for the manner in which Prince Leopold conducted himself. He was incessant in his attendance, and no countenance could more deeply express the anxiety he felt.-Once or twice he exclaimed to the medical attendants, " that the unrepining and patient endurance of the Princess, whilst it gave him comfort, communicated also a deep affliction at her sufferings being so lengthened.”

The more early stages of the Princess Charlotte's labour are related in the bulletins announcing that the child was still-born, and the Mother

Towards evening,

Europ. Mag. Yo' LXXII. Nå7,

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