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and all his works are of a tendency eminently moral and religious. For several years past, the infirmities of old age confined him to his apartments; but his mind continued active and vigorous till within a very short period of his decease. His favourite pursuits occupied him to the end of his career; and it may truly be said that he died at his post, arranging the observations he had made for the improvement of mankind. In private life, Mr. De Luc was much esteemed ; his manners were engaging, and his disposition amiable. To his contemporaries, he was ever ready to communicate his knowledge ; and to the youthful votaries of scientific information, he was a kind and willing instructor. Mr. De Luc has left to deplore their heavy loss, a son, now resident at Geneva, and a daughter, whose best praise is, that she has proved herself in every respect worthy of such a father, and the intensity of whose grief can be mitigated only by the cheering recollection of her tender assiduities to her venerable parent. He died at his house in Park-street, Windsor, on the 8th of November, at 90 years of age. Mr. De Luc has published a number of works connected with natural and sacred history. The following is the most perfect list we can make out. Researches into the Modifications of the Atmosphere, or Theory of Barometers and Thermometers. 2 vols. 4to. 1772. Travels to the Mountains of Faucigny, in Savoy, 1772. Narrative of several Excursions among the Alps, 1776. Letters, physical and moral, upon Mountains, and upon the History of the Earth and of the Human Race. Letters on some parts of Switzerland. 8vo. 1787. New Ideas on Meteorology. 2 vols. 8vo. 1787. Letters upon the Physical History of the Earth. 8vo, 1798. Letter to the Jewish Authors of a Mcmoir addressed to M. Teller. 8vo. 1790. Letter upon the Religious Education of Infancy, preceded and followed by historical details. 8vo 1800. Bacon as he is. Letters on Christianity, addressed to M. Teller. 1801. Substance (précis) of the Philosophy of Bacon. Abridgment of Principles and Facts

concerning Cosmology and Geology. 8vo. 1802. Principles of Theology, &c in answer to Dr. Teller's essay entitled “La plus ancienne Theodicée.” 8vo. 1808. Correspondence between Teller and De Luc. 1803. Introduction à la Physique Terrestre parles fluides expansibles, preécédée de deux Mémoires sur la nouvelle théorie chimique considérée sous diffèrents points de vue. 8vo. 2 vols. 1813. Elementary Treatise upon the Electrogalvanic fluid. 8vo. 2 vols. Observations upon a work entitled, “Lithologie Atmosphérique.” Annunciation of a Work, by J. A. Heimarus, upon the formation of the Globe. 8vo. Besides these works in French, Mr. De Luc has published in English: Geological Travels in the North of Europe. 8vo. 1810. Geological Travels in England. vols. 8vo. 1811. Geological Travels in France, Switzerland, and Germany. 2 vols. 8vo. 1813. An Elementary Treatise on Geology. from the French MS. of J. A. De Luc, by the Rev. H. F. A. Delafitte. 8vo. 1809. Mr. De Luc also published essays in the Philosophical Transactions, and in the journals of other learned societies.

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– o – ESPIONAGE. To the Editor of the European Magazine. sIR,

A” everything connected with France whilst under the sway of Buonaparte, more especially in regard to the system of espionage, treachery, aud duplicity, which characterized the agents employed by that profound waster of Arts (if I may be allowed to dub him with such a degree) must deserve attention, I send you the annexed extract from the journal of a gentleman who was detained for several years as an English prisoner in Holland, until released by the fortunate change of affairs in 1813. As this story will serve as an illustration of the character of spies and informers in all ages and countries, and is in itself interesting, I have no doubt you will think it worthy of being placed on record in the pages of your valuable

monthly miscellany. “There was a master of a Dutch vessel, known under the assumed name

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Memoir we have thus prefaced, we have an example that embodies every excellence of the character which we have delineated ; and the testimony which all classes of his fellow-subjects bear to the superior qualities of his head and his heart, amply warrants the truth of the application. The biography of a man whose life has been divided between the avocations of commerce and the duties of a good citizen, is not likely to comprehend those varieties of descriptive detail which contribute to the amusement of the general reader. But we have the satisfaction of making our appeal to those who have the happiness of knowing him, when we add, that the whole of his civil, commercial, and social path has been marked by those instructive evidences of virtuous principle which deserve the tribute of eulogium, and afford a living lesson for the instructive imitation of all who would be re•pected and beloved by those whose respect is honor and whose regards are praise.

BEESTON LONG, Esq. is the son of Beeston Long, Esq. of Bishopsgatestreet, who was Chairman of the West India merchants, and Governor of the Royal Exchange Assurance Company. He was born at his father's City residence, in the year 1757, and was educated at the Reverend Mr. Blacking's Academy, at Greenwich. In July 1787, he was married at Bishopsgate-church, to Frances Louisa, daughter of Sir Richard Neave. He is a Director of the Bank of England, of which he was elected Deputy-Governor in the year 1805, and Governor in the year 1808. In the year 1817, he was chosen Chairman of the London Dock Company, and fills the same situation in the Committee of West India merchants. He is a member of most of the commercial, benevolent, and philanthropic societies in London.

He has one sister and two brothers, the Right Hon. Charles Long, Treasurer of the Army Pay-office, Whitehall; and the Rev. William Long, of Standfield, near Saxmundam, in Suffolk.

His present residence is Coombes, in Surrey, and in Leadeuhall street, where the firm of Long and Company has been long known as the oldest and most respectable house in the Jamaica trade, established in London.

BIOGRAPHICAL REGISTER,

or
EMIN ENT PERSONS
RECENtly Deceased.
No. XXV.
JEAN AND RE DE Luc, F.R.s.

Th; celebrated physician and venerable philosopher was born at Seneva, in 1736-7. He became professor of philosophy and geology at Gottingen; but being nominated to some literary office by the Queen, he relinquished his German appointments, and settled in England. Besides his academic honours in this country, he was member of several foreign learned bodies ; and corresponded with a number of the most distinguished scholars in Europe. Few individuals stand higher for the useful nature of their pursuits, nor many for the zeal and talent with which they have applied themselves to the acquisition of knowledge, important to their fellowcreatures in this world and the world to come. Mr. de Luc devoted his long life to the study of geology and meteorology, with the view to explain the structure and composition of the earth; and, like the immortal Newton, his philosophical investigations only led him to the firmer conviction of the truth of the Holy Scriptures, which he defended with enthusiasm against the daring innovations of false principles, and insidious attacks of modern illumination. Not satisfied with researches in the best scientific publications extant, Mr. de Luc travelled over the greatest part of the Continent, to verify by experiense and examination the opinions which thc perusal of the highest authorities induced him to adopt. He thus added experiment to theory ; and it must be acknowledged, to his honour, that the science of geology, which has in our days assumed a rank apportioned to its value, is deeply indebted to his inquiries and discoveries. His labours were incessant, and learned men of all nations, as well as statesmen, and even sovereigns, were proud to render every assistance in his pursuits, to a person so beneficially and worthily employed. His laudable anxiety to demonstrate the authenticity of the sacred writings, led him to the diligent analysis of the primitive organization of the globe, aud the convulsions which it has experienced. He has, by this cours, been enabled to adduce many strong, facts in corroboration of the Mosaic history ;

and all his works are of a tendency eminently moral and religious. For several years past, the infirmities of old age confined him to his apartments; but his mind continued active and vigorous till within a very short period of his decease. His favourite pursuits occupied him to the end of his career; and it may truly be said that he died at his post, arranging the observations he had made for the improvement of mankind. In private life, Mr. De Luc was much esteemed ; his manners were engaging, and his disposition amiable. To his contemporaries, he was ever ready to communicate his knowledge ; and to the youthful votaries of scientific information, he was a kind and willing instructor. Mr. De Luc has left to deplore their heavy loss, a son, now resident at Geneva, and a daughter, whose best praise is, that she has proved herself in every respect worthy of such a father, and the intensity of whose grief can be mitigated only by the cheering recollection of her tender assiduities to her venerable parent. He died at his house in Park-street, Windsor, on the 8th of November, at 90 years of age. Mr. De Luc has published a number of works connected with natural and sacred history. The following is the most perfect list we can make out. Researches into the Modifications of the Atmosphere, or Theory of Barometers and Thermometers. 2 vols. 4to. 1772. Travels to the Mountains of Faucigny, in Savoy, 1772. Narrative of several Excursions among the Alps, 1776. Letters, physical and moral, upon Mountains, and upon the History of the Earth and of the Human Race. Letters on some parts of Switzerland. 8vo. 1787.

New Ideas on Meteorology. 2 vols.

8vo. 1787. Letters upon the Physical History of the Earth. 8vo, 1798.

Letter to the Jewish Authors of a Memoir addressed to M. Teller. 8vo. 1790. Letter upon the Religious Education of Infancy, preceded and followed by historical details. 8vo 1800. Bacon as he is. Letters on Christianity, addressed to M. Teller. 1801. Substance (précis) of the Philosophy of Bacon. Abridgment of Principles and Facts

concerning Cosmology and Geology. 8vo. 1802. Principles of Theology, &c in answer to Dr. Teller's essay entitled “La plus ancienne Theodicée.” 8vo. 1808. Correspondence between Teller and De Luc. 1803. Introduction à la Physique Terrestre parles sluides expansibles, preécédée de deux Mémoires sur la nouvelle théorie chimique considérée sous différeats points de vue. 8vo. 2 vols. 1813. Elementary Treatise upon the Electrogalvanic fluid. 8vo. 2 vols. Observations upon a work entitled, “Lithologie Atmosphérique.” Annunciation of a Work, by J. A. Heimarus, upon the formation of the Globe. 8vo. Besides these works in French, Mr. De Luc has published in English: . Geological Travels in the North of Europe. 8vo. 1810. Geological Travels in England. vols. 8vo. 1811. Geological Travels in France, Switzerland, and Germany. 2 vols. 8vo. 1813. An Elementary Treatise on Geology, from the French MS. of J. A. De Luc, by the Rev. H. F. A. Delafitte. 8vo. 1809. Mr. De Luc also published essays in the Philosophical Transactions, and in the journals of other learned societies.

–oESPIONAGE. To the Editor of the European Magazine. sIR, A” everything connected with France whilst under the sway of Buonaparte, more especially in regard to the system of espionage, treachery, aud duplicity, which characterized the agents employed by that profound waster of Arts (if I may be allowed to dub him with such a degree) must deserve attention, I send you the annexed extract from the journal of a gentleman who was detained for several years as an English prisoner in Holland, until released by the fortunate change of affairs in 1813. As this story will serve as an illustration of the character of spies and informers in all ages and countries, and is in itself interesting, I have no doubt you will think it worthy of being placed on record in the pages of your valuable monthly miscellany. “There was a master of a Dutch vessel, known under the assumed name of Joan Blaauw, who, in spite of every Too of the French Authoritics, cidered himself notorious by taking passengers over to England. After many fruitless endeavours to apprehend him, Du Terrage, director-general of the police in Holland, offers: a reward to any person who should deliver the said skipper into his hands. “Two Monsiers, drest like Gentlemen, went into a little alehouse to take shelter from the rain, and accidentally found there a man who had formerly been Master of a Friesland vessel, and who was bewailing to the hostess his wretched situation,-relating that he formerly commanded a vessel in the Baltic trade, and had now been two years ..of about in search of a precarious livelihood for his wife and seven small children, who were reduced to great distress in Friesland : and that; during the whole of that time, he had only been able to go one voyage, is mate, in the place of a man who was ill. “These two fellows having attentively listened to his tale, joined in the conversation; and, pretending to takc much pity on the poor man in the miserable state to which he was reduced, said to him : ‘Hark ye, my friend, there are still opportunities from time to time for a good seaman to earn a handsome sum of money.” The man declared he was willing to undertake any thing that would provide bread for his suffering family, and earnestly desired to know whether the gentlemen knew any thing that would suit him. Upon this, a place of meeting with him for the next day, and the parties met at the time agreed upon. He was then told, that ey were commissioned to look out for a skipper, who would carry over to England a rich gentleman, who was under the absolute necessity of going immediately to London; that they had found one John Blaauw, who had undertaken the job for 3,000 guilders, but that now a considerahle time had elapsed, and no John Blaauw made his appearance ; that the traveller was pressed for time; and that if he was disposed to do the job, and would undertake it under the name of Blaauw, he might casily pocket the money : but that it was most essential he should pretend to be John Blaauw himself, since the gentleman who wished to take his passage by reason of the favourable reports he had heard of that man, would hardly be induced to place confidence in any else. “ The poor fellow driven by dire necessity, struggling between hope and fear, with the golden prize in view, de

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cided finally to undertake the voyage. An agreement was made, that half of the promised sun should be paid on the embarkation of the traveller, and the other haif when he was lauded in England. A fresh appointment was made for the following day, when the travelling gentleman was to be introduced to him : 300 guilders were paid to him on account, to enable him to equip his vessel and buy provisions, every other necessary arrangement being at the same time agreed upon—again they met as appointed, and the supposed traveller was introduced to the pretended John Blaauw, and while he was

busy counting out the 300 gilders, in

burst the Gens d'armes, caught up the money, arrested all the four persons, and took them in custody to the House of Correction. “ The skipper was immediately confined au secret, and as soon as the door was locked upon him, the three rascals went off with the money, having made arrangements to go and receive the reward of their infamous treachery from Du Terrage. The poor misled skipper was as anxious about the fate of his unfortunate passenger add his friends the two agents, as about his own, and was quite at his wit’s end in being reduced to such a dilemma. Proving that he was not John Blauure, and that he had another name, was of no avail; and it was urged against him, as a matter of course, that no one did any thing of the sort in his own name, and, at all events, it was evident that he intended to have committed the act. “I saw this poor man for months together, as Iny fellow prisoner in the house of correction (or rather of corruption) wearing his waistcoat next his skin, for want of linen, looking squalid, miserable, and dejected ; his mental and bodily faculties both impaired by long imprisonment, penury, and injus. tice. One morning, when I arose, the man had disappeared. He had been car. fied out quietly in the night-time—God knows how or whither yet (and it will scarcely be believed in a Christian country), such was the corruption of the human heart, rendered callous aud depraved under the accursed French government, that I have met with persons in company who looked upon this horrid business as a funny thing, who passed it over with a smile, and would relate it as a droll story.” I remain, Sir, your's, &c. &c. Tuesday, 14th Oct. 1817. N.

EXTRACTS FROM A LAWYER'S PORTFOLIO. To the Editor of the European Magazine. st R. M. name is Peregrine Philowhim, formerly known to you as a member of the Brotherhood of Bioscribes, or Eunomian Society, assembled in search of the law of happiness. When the last meeting was called in their “Hermitage,” only the Chaplain, the Lawyer, the Philosopher, and myself, their humble historian, appeared at the septagon table. Our philosopher, now in the frost of his seventieth winter, looked sorrowfully at the vacant seats, and said, “If melancholy thoughts deserved encouragement, I might say this fraternity represents the state of man himself—our poetical enthusiast, our gay and busy philanthropist, our reasoning physician, and even our pleasant trifler, have forsaken us.-Thus the romance of our imagination, the sweetness of our social affections, our mental activity, and at last our tastes for the world's trifles, abandon us in succession ; and we all take refuge in vague chimeras, or perhaps, like me, in contemptuous indifference. Perceiving, as I thought, a malicious hint levelled at my scheming propensity, I answered, “ Certainly our Brotherhood, when complete, represented the seven ages, and our systems were nearly such as they usually produce. In the first age, we hope and love all things ; in the second, we seek, the greatest good; in the third, the least evil. The fourth age tempts a man to subdue or amend the world : the fifth learns to endure, the sixth to shun, and the last to forget it.” “And if,” interposed our Chaplain, “ the spirit of hope and benevolence is the spirit of the happiest age, how highly you have praised that religion which allows us to hope and love all things to the last ! Let us keep or recall our aptitude to love and be beloved, and we shall preserve the most previous privilege of youth.” “We have thermometers and chronometers,” I continued, laughing :“why should not we contrive a Biometer of pocket-size, in which the seven degrees of hope, pleasure, prudence, ambition, spieen, misanthropy, and selfishness, might be expressed ; and by considering every day at what point he found himself, a man might ascertain the ascent or descent of his mind's Furop. Mag. Vol. LXXII. Dec. 1817.

electric fluid, and measure the true spirit of life.” “ Practicable enough,” said Counsellor Lumiere, “but every one of us has a Biometer, as you call it, in his own conscience, if he dared consult it. It is true, however, that our comforts and our virtues rise or fall very much according to our esteem for our fellowcreatures, and we never are so ready to be vicious as when we find no good in them. Therefore I love to hoard every feeling or remembrance, every reason or example, which keeps me in goodhumour with my brethren ; and I know if I can always persuade myself to think well of them, I need not take much sole to be on good terms with myself.” Our sage Brother De Grey replied— “And after all, it is a very consoling consideration that there is nothing news —neither follies, wisdom, nor pleasure. It is consoling, I mean, because, though our imaginations lead us only to nearly the same kind of fooleries in all ages, our better faculties appear to have been always equal to their task. The amusements of man have often been ridiculous and unfixed, but his sense of truth and justice is immutable.” “ Let it be deemed no opposition to your inference, brother,” rejoined the advocate, “if I suggest that the frequent failures of human judgment, when most solemnly and deliberately exercised, should tend to abate that self-sufficience and that spleenful estimate of others which brings us to the lowest point of our friend Philowhim's Biometer. Let us ascribe more to erring judgment and less to criminal motives, if we wish to view our fellowcreatures kindly ; and since we have no better employment, let the secretary of our institution select a few of the numerous facts which have bassled human discerninent. We honour the Director of events when we acknowledge how often they are unravelled without and beyond the aid of our best faculties.” I opened the lawyer's portfolio, and found a bundle of cases distinguished by a band of doss silk, instead of the usual omitous red tape. The first that presented itself, in alphabetical order, was endorsed “An Assignment.” During one of the long vacations in the last century, a young man in an ordinary hunting-dress, with a single, dog. by his side, was stopped in his stroll through an obscure glen by a 3 R,

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