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SONNET BY THE LATE NAWAB OF OUDE, ASUF UD DOWLA.

In those eyes the tears that glisten as in pity for my pain,

Are they gems, or only dew-drops? can they, will they long remain

Why thy strength of tyrant beauty thus, with seeming ruth, restrain

Better breathe my last before thee, than in lingering grief remain!

To yon planet, Fate has given every month to wax and wane ;

And—thy world of blushing brightness—can it, will it, long remain :

Health and youth in balmy moisture on thy cheek their seat maintain;

But—the dew that steeps the rose-bud—can it, will it long remain

Asuf, why, in mournful numbers, of thine absence thus complain 2

Chance had joined us, chance has parted,—nought on earth can long remain.

In the world may’st thou, beloved, live exempt from grief and pain.

On my lips the breath is fleeting,-will it, can it long remain

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‘BRoTHER, know the world deceiveth ;
Trust on him who safety giveth ;
Fix not on the world thy trust,
She feeds us—but she turns to dust;
And the bare earth or kingly throne
Alike may serve to die upon.”

FROM THE SAME.

‘The man who leaveth life behind,
May well and boldly speak his mind;
Where flight is none from battle field,
We blithely snatch the sword and shield;
Where hope is past, and hate is strong,
The wretch's tongue is sharp and long;
Myself have seen, in wild despair,
The feeble cat the mastiff tear.”

FROM THE SAME.

* WHo the silent man can prize,
If a fool he be or wise 2
Yet, though lonely seem the wood,
Therein may lurk the beast of blood.
Often bashful looks conceal
Tongue of fire and heart of steel,
And deem not thou, in forest gray,
Every dappled skin thy prey;
Lest thou rouse, with luckless spear,
The tiger for the fallow-deer.”

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