Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

FOREIGN QUARTERLY REVIEW.

VOLUME XXI.

APRIL AND JULY, 1838.

AMERICAN EDITION.

NEW YORK:

PUBLISHED BY JEMIMA M. LEWER.

ANER OF BROADWAY AND PINE-STREET,

1838.

26

[ocr errors]

44

[ocr errors]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

CRITICAL NOTICES.
Epitome of the History of Ceylon, compiled from Native Annals and from the

Mahawanso. Translated by the Hon. G. Turnour, Esq. Ceylon
Civil Service

125

126

Quinti Horatii Flacci Opera, cum Versione Germanica edita
Grammatica Linguæ Armeniacæ. Auctore H. Petermann

126

Versuch einer Geschichte der Armenischen Literatur, nach den Werken der

Mechitaristen frei bearbeitet. Von C. F. Neumann

126

1. Pacto y Ley Fundamental de la Confederacion Peru-Boliviana.
2. Contra-Manifiesto al Publicado por el Gobierno de Buenos Aires, sobre las Ra.

zones con que pretende lejitimar la Guerra que declara a la Confed.
eracion Peru-Boliviana

127

Selections from the Bostân of Sâdi, by Forbes Falconer.

127

Miscellaneous Literary Notices.—Germany, France, Italy, Switzerland, Russia,

Servia, Greece, Egypt, Persia, India, Assam, Chile

129

List of the principal New Works published on the Continent, from January to

March, 1838, inclusive,

134

THE

LIBRARY

FOREIGN QUARTERLY REVIEW.

No. XLI.

FOR APRIL, 1838.

Art. I.Ramaseeana, or a Vocabulary of system of assassination were originally

the peculiar Language used by the Thugs, adopted, and brought to their present perfecwith an Introduction and Appendix, de- tion. These deficiencies, however, are, in scriptire of the System pursued by that a great degree to be attributed to the want Fraternity, and of the Measures which of leisure from official duties, on the part have been adopted by the Supreme Govern- of the author, Captain W. H. Sleeman, of ment of India for its suppression. Cal- the Indian military service, who has long cutta. 1836.

been employed on civil duty, and superadd

ed ill health. His modesty has also preWe have perused this work with the great-vented him from sufficiently bringing into est interest; for the subject is one which view his own exertions in the cause. must excite the most acute feelings in the To our conception the work should have mind of every friend to humanity. We have been arranged on somewhat of the following here an account of probably the most extra- plan. First, a description of the origin of ordinary organized society of ruthless vil

. the Thugs, their system and mode of prolains that ever existed on the face of the ceeding in their vocation; how they were globe. Robbers, bandits, pirates, are all in- enabled to increase their numbers and exAuenced by the same incitement—the hope tend their sphere of operations, and likeof plunder. In the conrse of their pursuit wise their superstitions. Secondly, an acoutrages, murder, and even wanton cruelty count of the first notice of these associations are often committed; but this is usually in by the British government; and of the sucthe moment of triumph, when brutal passion cessive steps which were taken, until the is inflamed, and seldom results from any pre- completely organized Thug police, which conceived plan. The Thugs, on the con- now exists, was established. Under this trary, systematically and invariab!y preface head would have been included a statement every robbery with deliberate murder, spar- of the difficulties, amounting, in fact, to im. ing neither age, sex, or class.

possibilities, under which the ordinary tribu. We have, however, in some respects, been nals laboured in their attempts to bring the much disappointed with the work. It seems Thugs to punishment: to conclude with some to be almost without plan, and the materials notices of their tempers, dispositions, and hathrown together in so heterogeneous a man- bits. To this might have been added, thirdly, ner, that information on any one portion of an appendix, containing a vocabulary of their the subject must be sought for sometimes in peculiar phraseology and slang terms; togea dozen different places, and is occasionally ther with any documents, private or official, found in a part of the work where it would which threw light on the subject, or might be least expected; while what should have be deemed useful to those employed in the formed valuable information is very indis- suppression of the crime, tinctly indicated; viz. how the plans now in Instead, therefore, of merely reviewing force for the suppression of this horrible the work, we shall attempt, as far as our

1

VOL. XXI.

« AnteriorContinuar »