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In the Preface to our twentieth volume*, we took a retrospective glance of the general character and events of the fifth part of a century which had then rolled away since we commenced our humble labours. We were enabled to present to our readers, if not a scene glowing with unmingled radiance, yet, upon the whole, such a brightening prospect, in respect to the progress of light and liberty, of humanity and public happiness, of Christian principles and Christian zeal, as served to relieve the many darker shades in the sketch, and to give the assurance of the approach of a more perfect day. No devout reader, we are persuaded, can look back upon the establishment and rapid advance of those benign institutions to which we then adverted, or can contemplate their continued and accelerated progress as recorded even in the succinct digests of our present volume, without feelings of delight and admiration; without lively gratitude to the Author of every good gift, for his manifold mercies to a guilty and perishing world ; without fervent prayer that his ways may be speedily known upon earth, his saving health unto all nations; and, in addition to all, without invigorated zeal, and renewed exertions, and warmer love, and more expanded liberality in forwarding this glorious consummation. If during the last year, we have had the melancholy task of recording wars and rumours of wars; if we have had to lament instances of political selfishness, or crooked policy, or unjust encroachment, or the sacrifice of Christian sympathy and duty at the shrine of a doubtful and short-sighted expediency; if in any instances we have seen power overstrained or popular liberty abused; if we have witnessed the opposition between the kingdom of light and the kingdom of darkness becoming more fearfully conspicuous, and the latter on any occasion triumphing for a moment over the former; if amidst our domestic events we have had to regret the continuance of distress in some agricultural districts, or the afflictions of the sister kingdom of Ireland, or the awful end of a distinguished statesman, or the removal of many faithful servants of God from their labours on earth to their reward in heaven; if many of our poor are still uneducated, and left destitute of Christian instruction; if our Sabbaths are still polluted; if many blots still remain in our legislation; if vice, irreligion, and blasphemy still continue to distil their venom; and if some of those who should be most anxious to repress them are wasting their energies, and afflicting their country, in arresting the great march of improvement, iu denouncing whatever is projected or achieved, except by themselves, to train the uninstructed, to reform the prisoner, to disenthral the slave, to reclaim the vicious, to civilize the barbarian, to christianize the heathen, and to enlighten and bless mankind; and if even in the Christian church itself where far the largest share of disinterested Zealand virtue ought to be expected, and where we are happy to believe a large share really exists, not a few of the above evils are to be found;—if the consideration of subjects like these has too often forced itself upon us in the course of our periodical labours during another year; still while we reflect on the many tacts of an opposite tendency which we have had the privilege of recording, and on the powerful influences which, under the Divine favour, are at work for the lasting benefit of the world, we are disposed to " thank God and take courage." It is certainly a blessing of no inconsiderable magnitude to have had another year of peace; to have witnessed an increase Of national prosperity ; to have seen our poor eating cheap bread and clothed with cheap clothing, and all ranks, with the exceptiou before mentioned, enjoying a large share of the comforts of life ;—but what to our minds is still more delightful, because it is as it were the seed-bed of fur wider and move niiino'ous blessings to future geoeiations, is the growth of that religious and moral zeal, of that spirit of disinterested philanthropy, of thai desire for universal peace and happiness, and of that disposition to conciliation and concord, which are now evidently in powerful operation, both in our own island and in many other pails of the world. Seldom, we are happy to stale, has a scar gone by within the period of our labours less ma Led by actimouious religious controversies among good men than the present; and wc would sincerely hope that this abatement ofhoslility (would that thcic had not been some exceptions!) does not arise from mere accident, but that it is a consequence of the growing prevalence of tciiptmal principles of love, piety, and candour. It is refreshing to behold Christians iiui-icing with united strength "to the battle of the Loul aga'iiit the mighty;" and that not only in Great Biiiain, or, among those who speak a common language with us on the western side of the Atlantic, (lowa ds wiiom a valued correspondent in our pages has endeavoured, ill au interesting sciies of papeis, to awaken just feelings of regard and co-opcral;on,) hut that, even in less dee and less religious countiies, Christian principles are widely extending; that even South Ameiica is spurning igtiorauce and slavery from her soil ; that Afiica is opening her bosom in civilization and the Gospel of Peace; that Asia is rising to new life, under the beams of the Sun of liighlcousness; and above all, that Etuope is almost every where enlisting Christians of every name under the common banner of their Lord and Saviour for the distribution of his divine word, and the exlrnsiou of his peaceful triumphs, whoever man and misery are to i>e found.

* Oar reader] are apprized, that, for the convenience of making the numeral of the year and of our rotuniei correspond in future with each other, the General Index to the first twenty totumet (which is in a considerable state of forwnrdness, and may be expected in a very few

What may be the results of these opening scenes of universal peace and holioess, or when we may witness their development, we dare not trust ourselves to predict; nor will we at present check the glow of feeling which must aiise, in every Christian mind, at (he anticipation of these blessings, by au eiiumeialion of the many formidable obstacles which still lie in the way of their attainment, and which require the conslant prayers and exei lions of the Clirisliau wot Id to remove. We will rather conclude our remarks with at once congratulating and exhorting the younger pa.t of our leaders, who are, we trust, destined not only to behold but largely to share iu these triumphs of mercy and religion. Many to whom our earlier volumes were introduced iu childhood and youth, perhaps by pious and affectionate parents who have since "ceased from their labouis," and " whose works follow them," are now among the active members of another generation, and .are witnessing a new succession giowiug up aiouud tliem to supply the places which they also must soon lelioquisb. On this interesting class of persons much depends. What their fathers laboured, through good report and evil report, lo begin, it is their happier lot to follow up with blighter and more animating prospects. These sons and daughters "of sainted sires" constitute a large ami important body of pei-ons whose conduct will he measured, not by the world nieieh, but by tiie Searcher of hearts, according lo the instructions Ihey have leceived, and the privileges they have enjoyed; and double will be their guilt and shame, if they recede from the Scripluial piinciples in which they were educated, or neglect the duties to which they were so anxiously trained. Let them then resolve first "lo give themselves to the Lord;" and then let them come forward prepared lo I lead iu the steps of those who taught them how to walk and lo please God, and resolved to curry towards perfection what the brevity of human life, and the feebleness of individual effort enabled those who have goue before only to plan aud to commence.

TABLE OF CONTENTS.

VOL. XXII.

BEING FOR THE YEAR 1822.

: : .

177

Page

NUMBER I.

NUMBER III.

Relig. Com. – Apocryphal Testa. Relig. Com. -- Apocryphal Tesla.

ment......................

ment (concluded) .......... 129

Family Sermon on 2 Cor. v. 1.

On Rom. ix. 3................ 134

Vatican and Alexandrine MSS. 10 Union of critical and devotional

Drawing Lois ......

Studies i................... 135

Religious Influence of Creation 13 Ou the Church Service ........ 138

On Moral Preacuing.

Family Sermon on Jer. vii. 4 ..., 1.11

Miscel.Jonrney througlı N. Ame Worldly Conformity .......... 144

rica....................... 26 Miscel.-Domestic Instructors.... 145

Law Clerkship to Graduales.... 23 Journey through N. America

liec. of -- Burnside's Religion of

(continued) ................ 148

Mankind ......... ........ 23 Drawing Lots .............. 153

Chalmers's Economy, No. VII. 39 Drawing Lots .. ............ 136
Li. Intel-New Works Oxford.. 48 Rev. aj The Pirate ....

157

Italy-General Washinglon .... 49 Red. of Red.--Bradley's Sermons .. 172

Arctic Expedition ............ ib. Lit. Iniel.-New Workx.......... 175

Relig. Iniel. - Church Missionary Population-Cambridge-Steam

Society..........

Engines-Air Pump ........ 175

Norů American Indians ....

Pawnbrokers - Copyright .. 176

Calcolia Mission College ......

United States ...

Colonization Society..........

Ludia ........

Pub. Aff. - France ............ 62 Smatra ...................

Spain--Turkey-United States 63 Relig. Tutel. - Church Missionary

Great Lrivain; Agricultural Dis.

Society .................... 178

tress; Ireland ..............

...... 64 North American Indians (con.

tinued) ................... Isi

NUMBER II.

Society for Suppression of Vice 135

Relig. Con. — Apociypial Testa Nival and Mil. Bible Society 180

meut (continued)............ 65 Drivisit and Foreign Bible Society 187

Oo Luke xxii. 44.............. 69 Pub. Aff. - France ............ 188

l'ainily Sermon on Luke xix.

Spain -Portgual ............ 190

41, 42, .........

Turkey .................. ib.
Simplicity in studying Scripture 74 Great Britain; Reduction of
Discourse with Nicodemus ....

Siock; Retrenchments ...... ib.

Calvary......................

80 Ireland .................... 192

Miscel.-Leory Martyn defended.. 80 Errulum ....

.... ib.
Modern Popish Miracles ......
Pleasing Instance of Catholic Li-

NUMBER IV.
beraliiy .................. 89

Relig. Com.- Life of Kev. J. W.
Rer. of — Ramsay's Inquiry ...... 92 Fletcher....................

193

Owen's t'eport ..............

Faniily Sermon on Lake xxiii. 46. 205

Hiots for Sunday Schools .... ib. Ou Rom. i. 19, 20. ............ 209

Chalpiers's Economy, No. VIII. 105 Calvary...................... 210

Lit, Iniet. – Cambridge-Humane

Calvary ....

211

Society .................. 117 Misce!.-'Moral Estimate of Para-

Vaccine E tablisiment ...... 113 dise Lost .... .......... 211

Herculaneum Januscripts .... ib. Providential Arrangements in

Bombay Regulation .......... ib. Chemistry ............... 218

Relig. Juiel.-Cirurch Missionary So. On the Reports of Societies.... 221

cieiy ..................

Rev.of-Hoare's Sermons ........ 223

Society for poor pious Clergymen 123 The Pirate (continued) ........ 237

Puú. Af-France.............. 123 Lit. Intel.-New Works–St. Da.
Spain; Slave Trade .......... ib. vid's Society ................
Tartes ................ ....

Ireland - Poland-Rassia-Unit-

Great Britain; Ireland........

ed States ..................

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enjoying a large share of t lie comforts of life ;—but what to our minds is si ill mote delightful, because it is as it were the seed-bed of far wider and more numerous blessings lo future genetations, is the growth of that religions anil niocil zeal, of that spirit of disinterested philanthropy, of thai desire lor universal peace and happiness, and of that disposition to conciliation and concord, which are now evidently in powerful operation, both in our own island and in many other pails of the world. Seldom, we are happy to stale, has a scar gone by within the period of our labours less walked by aciimouious religious couhoversies among good men than the present; ami wc would since-1 elv hope that this abatement of hostility (would that thcie had not been some exceptions!) does not arise from inrre accident, but that it is a consequence of the growing prevalence of tciiptmal principles of love, piety, and candour. It is refreshing to behold Christians niu->lei ing wilh united strength "lo the battle of the Loid ogH'iMt the mighty;" ami that not only in Great Btiiaiu, or, among those who speak a common language with us on the western side of the Atlaulic, (towads wiiotu a valued cm respondent in our pages has endeavoured, in an interesting sciics of pa pets, to awaken just feelings of regard and ro-opc ration,) but that, even in less fiee and less religious conntiies, Christian principles are widely extending; that eveu South Auit-iica is spurning ignorance and slavery from her soil ; that Afiica is opening her bosom to civilisation and the Gospel of Peace; that Asia is rising to new life, under the beams of the Sun of Righteousness; and above all, that Em ope is almost every where enlisting Christians of every name under the common banner of their Lord and Saviour for the distribution of his divine word, and (he extension of his peaceful triumphs, wheievcr man and misery ate lo i>e found.

What may be the results of these opening scenes of universal peace and holiness, or when we may witness iheir development, we dare not trust ourselves to predict; nor will we at present check the glow of feeling which must aiise, in every Christian mind, at the anticipation of these blessings, by an enumeration of the many formidable obstacles which still lie in the way of their attainment, and which require the conslant prayers and exei lions of the Ctirisliau woild to remove. We will ratlin conclude our remarks with at once congratulating and exhorting the younger pa.t of our leaders, who are, we trust, destined not only to behold but largely to share iu these triumphs of mercy and religion. Many to whom our earlier volumes were introduced iu childhood and youth, perhaps by pious and affectionate parents who have since "ceased from their labouis," and "whose works follow them," are now among the active members of another generation, and .are witnessing a new succession giowing up mound them lo supply the places which they also must sooli telinquish. On this interesting class of persons much depends. What their fathers laboured, through good report and evil report, lo begin, it is Iheir happier lot lo follow up wilh brighterand more animating prospects. These sous and daughters "of sainted sires" constitute a Jaige and important body of pei-ons whose conduct will be measured, not by the world rneich, but by lite Seaicher of hearts, according to the instiuciions lliey have teceived, and llie privileges they have enjoyed; and double will be their guill and shame, if they recede from the Scriptuial piiuciples in which they were educated, or neglect the duties lo which they were so aiixiou-.lv trained. Let them then resolve first "lo give themselves to the Lord;" and then let them come forward prepared to ttead iu the steps of those who taught them how to walk and to please God, and resolved to carry towards perfection what the brevity of human life, and lite feebleness of individual cffoit enabled those who have gone before only to plan and to commence.

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