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Works by Dr. M'Cosh.

1. THE METHOD OF THE DIVINE GOVERNMENT,

PHYSICAL AND MORAL. 8vo. $2.50. "It is refreshing to read a work so distinguished for originality and soundness of thinking, especially as coming from an author of our own country.”. Sir William Hamilton.

“Dr. M'Cosh's work is of the compact cast and thought-eliciting com plexion which men do not willingly let die; and we promise such of our readers as may possess themselves of it much entertainment and instruction of a high order, and a fund of solid thought, which they will not soon exhaust." — Hugh Miller, in Witness.

“This work is distinguished from other similar ones by its being based upon & thorough study of physical science, and an accurate knowledge of its present condition, and by its entering in a deeper and more unfettered manner than its predecessors upon the discussion of the appropriate psychological, ethical, and theological questions. The author keeps aloof at once from the à priori idealism and dreaminess of German speculation since Schelling, and from the one-sidedness and narrowness of the empiricism and positivism which have so prevailed in England. In the provinces of psychology and ethics he follows conscientiously the facts of consciousness, and draws his conclusions of them commonly with penetration and logical certainty." - Dr. Olrici, in Zeitschrift für Philosophie.

2. TYPICAL FORMS AND SPECIAL ENDS IN CREA.

TION. BY JAMES M'Cosa, LL. D., AND DR. DICKIE.

8vo. $2.50. “It is alike comprehensive in its range, accurate and minute in its details, original in its structure, and devout and spirited in its tone and tendency. It illustrates and carries out the great principle of analogy in the Divine plans and works far more minutely and satisfactorily than it has been done before; and while it presents the results of the most profound scientific research, it presents them in their higher and spiritual relations." - Argus

3. THE INTUITIONS OF THE MIND. New AND IM

PROVED EDITION. 8vo. $3. “I have given an approving notice of Dr. M'Cosh’s ‘Intuitions of the Mind in my 'Jahrbücher für Deutsche Theologie' (1861). I value it for its large ac quaintance with English Philosophy, which has got led him to neglect the great German works. I admire the moderation and clearness, as well as comprehension, of the author's views. While entertaining a great respect for the Masters of the Scottish Philosophy, such as Sir W. Hamilton, this has not restrained his independent judgment, or kept him stationary.” – Dr. Dorner, of Berlin.

“The undertaking to adjust the claims of the sensational and intuitional philosophies, and of the à posteriori and à priori methods is not only legitimate, but accomplished in this work with a great amount of success.” — Westminster Review, April, 1865.

“No philosopher, before Dr. M'Cosh, has clearly brought out the stages b: which an original and individual intuition passes first into an articulate but still individual judgment, and then into a universal maxim or principle; and no ono has so clearly or completely classified and enumerated our intuitive convictions, or exhibited in detail their relations to the various sciences which repose on them as their foundations. The amount of summarized information which it contains is very great; and it is the only work on the very important subject with which it deals. Never was such a work so much needed as in the present day. It is the only scientific work adapted to counteract the school of Mill, Bain, and Herbert Spencer, which is so steadily prevailing among the students of the present generation.” - Lonuon Quarterly Review, April, 1865.

“ Though treating of the intuitions of the mind, and thus laboring in that particular division of philosophy which is most liable to degenerate into imaginative, or at best merely speculative notions, Dr. M'Cosh preserves a clear, calm, and sober intelligence. The history of many philosophic opinions, and the peculiarities of many philosophical schools, are also passed in review in the notes to the work, in a concise yet thorough manner; and the criticisms that are made upon several of the celebrated theories of the past are candid and exhaustive." - Dr. Shedd in Introduction to Second American Edition,

: When the original edition of this work appeared, we characterized it in terms of strong recommendation, such as we rarely bestow on any work, and pointed out at some length its distinctive merits. We will just say here, that, in regard to all the greatest issues between Mill and Hamilton, indeed, all the great issues raised by either of these eminent authors, or their respective philosophical schools; and in regard to nearly every great issue raised between the philosophic scepticism and the Christian philosophy of our day, Dr. M'Cosh quite gunerally takes the right side.” – Princeton Review, Oct. 1865.

OF

CALIFCS :D

AN EXAMINATION
MR. J. S. MILL'S PHILOSOPHY;
DEFENCE OF FUNDAMENTAL TRUTH.

JAMES MCCOSH, LL.D.,
UNIV!

BEING A

BY

PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY, PRINCETON.

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LIBRA

SECOND EDITION, WITH ADDITIONS.

London:

MACMILLAN AND CO.

Leiht

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PREFACE TO SECOND EDITION.

I

N reading lately the Memoirs, Letters, and Remains of

Alexis De Tocqueville, who has speculated so profoundly on the causes and consequences of national character, I was much struck with the following:

“ The ages in which metaphysics have been most cultivated, have in general been those in which men have been most raised above themselves. Indeed, though I care little for the study, I have always been struck by the influence which it has exercised over the things which seem least connected with it, and even over society in general. I do not think that any statesmen ought to be indifferent as to whether the prevailing metaphysical opinions be materialistic or not. Condillac, I have no doubt, drove many people into materialism, who had never read his book; for abstract ideas, relating to human nature, penetrate at last, I know not how, into public morals."

Had De Tocqueville's studies run in that direction, it would not have been difficult for him to unfold the causes of the phenomena which he has so carefully noted. These phenomena are three in number. First, a taste for philosophic speculation is a mark of an elevated age. It is the sign of a time which believes that there is as much above the surface of the earth, and beneath it, as there is on it; and is seeking successfully or unsuccessfully to gauge the height of the heavens, in order to draw down influences from it; or to penetrate the ground in the hope of discovering mines from which unseen wealth may be dug. The age which comprised Socrates,

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