Wild Flowers: Where to Find, and how to Know Them ; with Remarks on the Economical and Medicinal Uses of Our Native Plants

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Routledge, 1900 - 322 páginas

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Página 260 - The melancholy days are come, the saddest of the year, Of wailing winds, and naked woods, and meadows brown and sere. Heaped in the hollows of the grove, the autumn leaves lie dead; They rustle to the eddying gust, and to the rabbit's tread ; The robin and the wren are flown, and from the shrubs the jay, And from the wood-top calls the crow through all the gloomy day. Where...
Página 260 - And from the wood-top calls the crow through all the gloomy day. Where are the flowers, the fair young flowers, that lately sprang and stood In brighter light, and softer airs, a beauteous sisterhood? Alas! they all are in their graves, the gentle race of flowers Are lying in their lowly beds, with the fair and good of ours. The rain is falling where they lie, but the cold November rain Calls not from out the gloomy earth the lovely ones again.
Página 278 - All hailed, with uncontrolled delight, And general voice, the happy night, That to the cottage, as the crown, Brought tidings of salvation down.
Página 223 - So passed the winter's day; but still, When summer smiled on sweet Bowhill, And July's eve, with balmy breath, Waved the blue-bells on Newark heath, When throstles sung in Harehead-shaw, And corn was green on Carterhaugh, And flourished, broad, Blackandro's oak, The aged harper's soul awoke...
Página 51 - The grand transition, that there lives and works A soul in all things, and that soul is God. The beauties of the wilderness are his, That makes so gay the solitary place, Where no eye sees them. And the fairer forms, That cultivation glories in, are his. He sets the bright procession on its way, And marshals all the order of the year ; He marks the bounds which Winter may not pass...
Página 78 - To trace in nature's most minute design The signature and stamp of power divine, Contrivance intricate, expressed with ease, Where unassisted -sight no beauty sees, The shapely limb and lubricated joint, Within the small dimensions of a point, Muscle and nerve miraculously spun, His mighty work, who speaks and it is done...
Página 280 - WHERE the copse-wood is the greenest, Where the fountain glistens sheenest, Where the morning dew lies longest, There the lady fern grows strongest.
Página 51 - He sets the bright procession on its way, And marshals all the order of the year. He marks the bounds which 'Winter may not pass, And blunts his pointed fury. In its case, Russet and rude, folds up the tender germ Uninjured, with inimitable art, And, ere one flowery season fades and dies, Designs the blooming wonders of the next.
Página 141 - Flowers ! when the Saviour's calm benignant eye Fell on your gentle beauty — when from you That heavenly lesson for all hearts he drew, Eternal, universal, as the sky — Then, in the bosom of your purity, A voice He set, as in a temple-shrine, That life's quick travellers ne'er might pass you by Unwarn'd of that sweet oracle divine.
Página 96 - Happy who walks with him ! whom what he finds Of flavour or of scent in fruit or flower, Or what he views of beautiful or grand In nature, from the broad majestic oak To the green blade that twinkles in the sun, Prompts with remembrance of a present God.

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