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THE PRIEST'S PRAYER BOOK.

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Now publishing in Parts, 1s. each.
THE PEOPLE'S HYMNAL TUNE BOOK,

EDITED BY RICHARD REDHEAD.

The Melodies contained in this Tune Book will be found suitable for all Hymnals, an Index 01 Metres being given in each Part to assist those who use it in selecting Music appropriate to the words which they desire to sing. Part I. contains upwards of Eighty Hymn Tunes, and provides Music for Thirty different Metres. A great variety of style will be a distinctive feature in this work, the Melodies ranging from the popular modern Tune and the simple Carol, to the archaic Gregorian and the elaborate Chorale. The entire collection will make full provision for a hundred and thirty different Metres, and will, it is believed, prove to be the most complete and comprehensive Book of Hymn Tunes extant.

RESPONSAL TO THE OFFICES OF THE SICK

IN THE PRIEST'S PRAYER Book. Is.

Reprinted from "The Priest's Prayer Book.”

PAROCHIAL OFFICES. Containing Offices for a Bible Class ; A Confirmation Class; A Communion Class ; A Cottage Lecture; A Missionary Meeting; A Meeting of District Visitors; A Parochial Guild or Society. Price id.,

SCHOOL OFFICES. Containing Offices for a Day School ; A Night School; A Sunday School. Price ld.

London: J. MASTERS, 78, New Bond Street.

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LONDON : PRINTED BY J. MASTERS AND SON, ALBION BUILDINGS, BARTHOLOMEW CLOSE. E.C. PREFACE.

This Volume is designed as an Appendix to the Book of Common Prayer, and to provide the parochial Clergy with Offices and Collects for those occasional ministrations for which no formal or authorized provision has been made. Nearly all matter which may be found in the Prayer Book itself has consequently been omitted, but by a simple method of cross references the Officiant is enabled to utilize such portions of the Book of Common Prayer as are available for the case in hand.

The Offices, and particularly those for the Visitation of the Sick, are based on ancient models, and are constructed so as to allow of the greatest plasticity in their use. In structure these forms consist of two parts, one invariable, designed as a framework ; the other, changeable within certain limits, to admit of diversity. A rigid and invariable form, even if appropriate, either causes wearisome repetition, or compels the substitution of one that is inappropriate, for the sake of change ; and this inconvenience makes itself especially felt when the Priest has to pay constant visits to a single case, or else to many cases of the same type.

As all the Offices of the Sick are identical in construction, an analysis of one of them will serve to indicate the method of using each of the others. That for a Blind Person (p. 90) is selected because of its necessarily special character, which might seem to preclude variety of treatment, and either to enforce the use of a stereotyped formula, or else to require the substitution of matter having but little direct bearing on the case.

It begins with the Invocation of the Holy Trinity, the Our FATHER, and the Creed. Then follow three pairs of versicles, the first of which marks the character of the whole Office as especially suitable for the Blind. “ť. Thou also shalt light my candle. Ry. The LORD my God shall make my darkness to be light.” The same idea is contained in the Antiphon, which strikes the key-note, and indicates the spirit in which

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