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But there comes no breath from the chambers of death, y While the lifeless fount gushes under the tree.'

The skies grow dark, and they glare with red;
The tree shakes off its spicy bloom;

The waves of the fount in a black pool spread;
And in thunder sounds the garden's doom.

Down springs the bird with a long shrill cry,
Into the sable and angry flood;

And the face of the pool, as he falls from high,
Curdles in circling stains of blood.

But sudden again upswells the fount;
Higher and higher the waters flow,

In a glittering diamond arch they mount,
And round it the colors of morning glow.

Finer and finer the watery mound
Softens and melts to a thin-spun veil,

And tones of music circle around,
And bear to the stars the fountain's tale

And swift the eddying rainbow screen
Falls in dew on the grassy floor;

Under the spice-tree the garden's queen
Sits by her lover, who wails no more.

ELIZABETH AND THE ROSES. (From the German.)

Know you not the stately dame?
From Wurtburg's castled height she came,
And in her basket brings she store
To satisfy the hungry poor.

The pages and the courtiers high
Marked the expense with grudging eye;
And e'en the Landgrave's kitchen folk
In murmurs their displeasure spoke.

Artfully told in Ludwig's ear,
The lady's charities appear
A weighty evil, as through her
His household’s rights endangered were.

And he forbade, with cruel mind,
Such pleasure to his lady kind;
Asking, in scorn, if it were meet
A princess should a beggar greet.

Long to her lord's stern will she bowed,
Till upward to the castle loud
The starving shrieked in their despair;
No longer then would she forbear.

Her maid she beckoned stealthily
To find for her the hidden key;
Then filled her basket running o'er,
And glided from the gate Once more.

One of the mischief-loving train
Of courtiers spied her, nor in vain;
Straight to the knight he made his way,
The gentle lady to betray.

Stern Ludwig o'er the drawbridge passed, And down the Steep rock rode he fast, With anger pale, as 'twere with death, Woe! woes to poor Elizabeth !

She hears her husband's clanging spurs, Kindling with rage his eye meets hers; Trembling, she knows not what to dread, Her faint limbs move not, droops her head.

And underneath her apron's folds
Fier timid hand the basket holds;
She reads no mercy in his eyes,
Heart-broken upon God she cries.

Put Ludwig breaks her silent prayer, —
"Woman! what hast thou hidden there?”
And, curbing his wild rage no more,
The apron from the basket tore.

O miracle! therein are spread
Fairest of roses white and red;
Mercy in Ludwigs’ soul is born,
And fills the place of lordly scorn.

He cries, subdued his stubborn will,
“O purest, noblest, love me still!
Upon thy blessed errand hie,
Thy heart's kind impulse gratify.”

And still she found her basket's store,
All veiled with roses, running o'er;
And safely through the valley trod,
She who had put her trust in God.

FAIRX SONG
JOHN KEATS.

Shed no tear! O, shed no tear!
The flower will bloom another year.
Weep no more! O, weep no more!
Young buds sleep in the root's white core.
Dry your eyes! O, dry your eyes!
For I was taught in Paradise

To ease my breast of melodies,
Shed no tear.

[graphic]

Overhead! look overhead! 'Mong the blossoms white and red, Look up, look up! I flutter now On this fresh pomegranate bough. See me!’tis this silvery bill Ever cures the good man's ill, Shed no tear! O, shed no tear! . The flower will bloom another year.

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I vanish in the heaven’s blue, L
Adieu, adieu!

LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.
LAETITIA ELIZABETH LANDON.

Come back, come back together,
All ye fancies of the past,
Ye days of April weather,
Ye shadows that are cast
By the haunted hours before!
Come back, come back, my Childhood;
Thou art summoned by a spell
From the green leaves of the wildwood,
From beside the charméd well,
For Red Riding Hood, the darling,
The flower of fairy lore! -

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