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A PEAR'S SPINNING.
ELIZABETH B. BROWNFNG.

He listened at the porch that day,
To hear the wheel go on, and on;

And then it stopped, ran back away,
While through the door he brought the sun:
But now my spinning is all done.

He sat beside me, with an oath
That love ne'er ended, once begun:

I smiled—believing for us both,
What was the truth for only one.
And now my spinning is all done.

My mother cursed me that I heard
A young man's wooing as I spun:

Thanks, cruel mother, for that word,
For I have, since, a harder known!
And now my spinning is all done.

I thought—O God!—my first-born's cry
Both voices to mine ear would drown:

I listened in mine agony—
It was the silence made me groans
And now my spinning is all done.

Bury me 'twixt my mother's grave
(who cursed me on her death-bed lone)
And my dead baby's (God it save!)
Who, not to bless me, would not moan.
And now my spinning is all done.

A stone upon my heart and head,
But no name written on the stone!

Sweet neighbors, whisper low instead,
"This sinner was a loving one—
And now her spinning is all done.”

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CORA FABRI.
What would the rose do without the sun

*d his golden fingers, spread her apart? What would the ros. do without the dew,

Nestling deep in her fragrant heart?

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What would the bee do without the rose,
And the honey hid mid her fragile leaves?

What would the bird do without her nest?
And the summer day without the breeze?

What would the night do without the stars,
And the misty moon in her silver bed?

What would the heart do without its tears?
What would the world do if Love had fled?

THE MILKMAID

O where are you going so early? he said;
Good luck go with you, my pretty maid;
To tell you my mind I’m half afraid,
But I wish I were your sweetheart.
When the morning sun is shining low,
And the cocks in every farmyard crow,
I’ll carry your pail,
O'er hill and dale,
And I’ll go with you a-milking.

I’m going a-milking, sir, says she,
Through the dew, and across the lea;
You ne'er would even yourself to me,
Or take me for your sweetheart.
When the morning sun, &c.

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