Commentaries on the Laws of England: In Four Books, Volumen1

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A. Strahan and W. Woodfall, law-printers to the King, 1791

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Página 400 - Smith (?'), they be made good cheap in this kingdom ; for whosoever studieth the laws of the realm, who studieth in the universities, who professeth the liberal sciences, and, (to be short,) who can live idly, and without manual labour, and will bear the port, charge, and countenance of a gentleman, he shall be called master, and shall be taken for a gentleman.
Página 100 - Britain; and that the King's Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords spiritual and temporal and Commons of Great Britain in Parliament assembled, had, hath and of right ought to have, full power and authority to make laws and statutes of sufficient force and validity to bind the colonies and people of America, subjects of the Crown of Great Britain in all cases whatsoever.
Página 147 - That all writs, processes, commissions, patents, grants, and other things, which now run in the name and style of the keepers of the liberty of England by authority of Parliament...
Página 121 - This natural liberty consists properly in a power of acting as one thinks fit, without any restraint or control, unless by the law of nature; being a right inherent in us by birth, and one of the gifts of God to man at his creation, when he endued him with the faculty of free will.
Página 231 - Will you to the utmost of your power maintain the laws of God, the true profession of the gospel, and the Protestant reformed religion established by the law? And will you preserve unto the bishops and clergy of this realm, and to the churches committed to their charge, all such rights and privileges as by law do or shall appertain unto them, or any of them? King or queen: All this I promise to do.
Página 436 - ... or under the protection and influence of her husband, her baron, or lord; and her condition during her marriage is called her coverture.
Página 159 - It will not therefore be expected that we should enter into the examination of this law, with any degree of minuteness: since, as the same learned author assures us (o), it is much better to be learned out of the rolls of parliament and other records, and by precedents and continual experience, than can be expressed by any one man.
Página 121 - Political, therefore, or civil liberty, which is that of a member of society, is no other than natural liberty so far restrained by human laws (and no farther) as is necessary and expedient for the general advantage of the public.
Página 300 - A man is not an idiot, if he hath any glimmering of reason, so that he can tell his parents, his age, or the like common matters. But a man who is born deaf, dumb, and blind, is looked upon by the law as in the same state with an idiot ; he being supposed incapable of any understanding, as wanting all those senses which furnish the human mind with ideas.
Página 132 - But the happiness of our constitution is, that it is not left- to the executive power to determine when the danger of the state is so great, as to render this measure expedient...

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