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584, 585.

OCCASIONS IN PRIVATE

6 Where thou shalt settle my abode,

There would I choose to be; For in thy presence death is life,

And earth is heaven with thee.

584.

L. M.

WATTS. Sickness and Sorrow removed. Ps. 30 1 I WILL extol thee, Lord, on high;

At thy command diseases ily;
Who but a God can speak, and save

From the dark borders of the grave! 2 Sing to the Lord, ye saints of his,

And tell how large his goodness is;
Let all your powers rejoice and bless,
While

you record his holiness. 3 His anger but a moment stays;

His love is life and length of days; Though grief and tears the night employ, The morning star restores the joy.

585.

C. M.

ANONYMOUS. The Widow's Prayer. 1 THOUGH, faint and sick, and worn away

With poverty and woe,
My widowed feet are doomed to stray

Mid thorny paths below;
2 Be thou, O Lord ! my Savior still —

My confidence and guide ;. I know that perfect is thy will,

Whate'er that will decide. 3 I know the soul that trusts in thee

Thou never wilt forsake;

454

AND FAMILY DEVOTION,

586.

And though a bruised reed I be,

That reed thou wilt not break.
4 Then, keep me, Lord! where'er I go -

Support me on my way,
Though, worn with poverty and woe,

My widowed footsteps stray!
5 To give my weakness strength, O God!

Thy staff shall yet avail;
And though thou chasten with thy rod,

That staff shall never fail.

586.

L. M.

ANONYMOUS On the Death of a Child. 1 As the sweet flower which scents the mom,

But withers in the rising day,
Thus lovely seemed the infant's dawn!

Thus swiftly fled his life away!
2 Ere sir conld blight, or sorrow fade,

Death timely came with friendly care;
The opening bud to heaven conveyed,

And bade it bloom forever there.
3 Yet the sad hour that took the boy

Perhaps has spared a heavier doom -
Snatched him from scenes of guilty joy,

Or from the pangs of ills to come. 4 He died before his infant soul.

Had ever burned with wrong desire,
Had ever spurned at Heaven's controly

Or ever quenched its sacred fire. 5 He died to sin, he died to care,

But for a moment felt the rod,
Then, rising on the viewless air,
His happy spirit soared to God.

And though a bruised reed I be,

That reed thou wilt not break.
4 Then, keep me, Lord! where'er I go-

Support me on my way,
Though, worn with poverty and woe,

My widowed footsteps stray!
5 To give my weakness strength, O God!

Thy staff shall yet avail;
And though thou chasten with thy rod,

That staff shall never fail.

586.
L. M.

ANONYMOUS On the Death of a Child. 1 As the sweet flower which scents the morn,

But withers in the rising day,
Thus lovely seemed the infant's dawn!

Thus swiftly fled his life away!
2 Ere sin conld blight, or sorrow fade,

Death timely came with friendly care;
The opening bud to heaven conveyed,

And bade it bloom forever there.
3 Yet the sad hour that took the boy

Perhaps has spared a heavier doom,-
Snatched him from scenes of guilty joy,

Or from the pangs of ills to come. 4 He died before his infant soul

Had ever burned with wrong desire,
Had ever spurned at Heaven's control,

Or ever quenched its sacred fire. 5 He died to sin, he died to care,

But for a moment felt the rod,
Then, rising on the viewless air,
His happy spirit soared to God.

455

587. C. M.

COTTON. In Affliction, 1 AFFLICTION is a stormy deep,

Where wave resounds to wave;
Though o'er my head the billows roll,

I know the Lord can save. 2 When darkness and when sorrows rose,

And pressed on every side,
The Lord has still sustained my steps,

And still has been my guide.
3 Perhaps, before the morning dawn,

He will restore my peace;
For he who bade the tempest roar,

Can bid the tempest cease.
4 In the dark watches of the night

I'll count his mercies o'er;
I'll praise him for ten thousand past,

And humbly sue for more.
5 Here will I rest, here build my hopes,

Nor murmur at his rod;
He's more than all the world to me, -
My health, my life, my God!

456

MISCELLANEOUS.

588.

C. M.

Watts. Power of Sin broken at Death. 1 Our sins, alas ! how strong they be!

And, like a violent sea,
They break our duty, Lord, to thee,

And hurry us away.
% The waves of trouble, how they rise !

How loud the tempests roar!
But death shall land our weary souls

Safe on the heavenly shore.
3 There, to fulfil his sweet commands

Our speedy feet shall move; No sin shall člog our winged zeal,

Or cool our burning love. 4 There shall we sit, and sing, and tell

The wonders of his grace; Till heavenly raptures fire our hearts,

And smile in every face.
5 Forever his dear, sacred name

Shall dwell upon our tongue;
And Jesus and salvation be

The close of every song.

MISCELLANEOUS.

588,
C. M.

WATTS. Power of Sin broken at Death. 1 Our sins, alas ! how strong they be!

And, like a violent sea,
They break our duty, Lord, to thee,

And hurry us away.
% The waves of trouble, how they rise !

How loud the tempests roar!
But death shall land our weary souls

Safe on the heavenly shore.
3 There, to fulfil his sweet commands

Our speedy feet shall move;
No sin shall clog our winged zeal,

Or cool our burning love.
4 There shall we sit, and sing, and tell

The wonders of his grace;
Till heavenly raptures fire our hearts,

And smile in every face.
5 Forever his dear, sacred name

Shall dwell upon our tongue ; And Jesus and salvation be The close of every song.

589.

L. M.

STENNETT. Pride lamented. 1 Oft have I turned my eye within,

And brought to light some latent sin ;
But pride, the vice I most detest,

Still lurks securely in my breast.
2 Here with a thousand arts she tries

To dress me in a fair disguise,
To make a guilty, wretched worm

Put on an angel's brightest form.
3 She hides my follies from mine eyes,

And lifts my virtues to the skies;
And while the specious tale she tells,

Her own deformity conceals.
4 Rend, O my God, the veil away:

Bring forth the monster to the day;
Expose her hideous form to view,

And all her restless power subdue. 5 So shall humility divine

Again possess this heart of mine ;
And form a temple for my God,
Which he will make his loved abode.

3 By doubt perplexed, in error lost,

With trembling step he seeks his way;
How vain of wisdom's gift the boast!

Of reason's lamp how făint the ray! 4 Follies and crimes, a countless sum,

Are crowded in life's little span :
How ill, alas! does pride become

That erring, guilty creature, mạn!
5 God of our lives! Father divine !

Give us a meek and lowly mind;
In modest worth O let us shine,
And peace in humble virtue find.

590.

L. M.

*ENFIELD Absurdity of Pride. 1 WHEREFORE should man, frail child of elay,–

Who, from the cradle to the shroud,
Lives but the insect of a day,-

O why should mortal man be proud ?2 His brightest visions just appear,

Then vanish, and no more are found;
The stateliest pile his pride can rear,
A breath may level with the ground.

458

591. L. M.

BEDDO Inconstancy in Religion. 1 The wandering star, and fleeting wind,

Both represent th' unstable mind;
The morning cloud, and early dew,

Bring our inconstancy to view. 2 But cloud and wind, and dew and star,

Faint and imperfect emblems are;
Nor can there aught in nature be

So fickle and so false as we. 3 Our outward walk, and inward frame,

Scarce through a single hour the same; We vow, and straight s forget,

And then these very vows repeat. 4 We sin forsake, to sin return;

Are hot, are cold, now freeze, now burn In deep distress, then raptures feel, We soar to heaven, then sink to hell

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our vows

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