A candid examination of the mutual claims of Great-Britain, and the Colonies: with a plan of accommodation on constitutional principles

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Printed by J. Rivington, 1775 - 62 páginas
 

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Página 51 - General, to be appointed by the King, and a grand Council, to be chosen by the Representatives of the people of the several colonies, in their respective assemblies, once in every three years.
Página 52 - General as soon as conveniently may be after his Appointment. That there shall be a new Election of Members for the Grand Council every three years, and on the Death...
Página 52 - President-General, by and with the advice and consent of the Grand-Council, hold and exercise all the legislative rights, powers, and authorities, necessary for regulating and administering all the general police and affairs of the colonies, in which Great-Britain and the colonies, or any of them, the colonies in general, or more than one colony, are in any manner concerned, as well civil and criminal as commercial. That the...
Página 51 - America, including all the faid colonies ; within and under which government each colony fhall retain its prefent conftitution and powers of regulating and governing its own internal police in all cafes whatever. " That the faid government be adminiftered by a...
Página 49 - He waited with patience to see whether any rational scheme of union would be adopted by the Congress, determined to unite with them in any measure which might tend to a reconciliation between the two countries ; but he waited in vain : and when he found them bewildered, perpetually changing their ground, taking up principles one day, and shifting them the next, he thought it his duty, however little the prospect of success, to speak his sentiments with firmness, and to endeavour to shew them the...
Página 52 - King; and his aflcnt fhall be requifite to all acts of the Grand Council, and it fhall be his office and duty to caufe them to be carried into execution. " That the Prefident General, by and with the advice and...
Página 41 - Galloway contended that each colony should "regulate its own internal police within its particular circle of territory"; but thus far and no farther could its authority extend.2 There were, however, difficulties in this solution.
Página 52 - ... regulations may originate, and be formed and digested, either in the Parliament of Great Britain or in the said Grand Council, and being prepared, transmitted to the other for their approbation or dissent ; and that the assent of both shall be requisite to the validity of all such general acts or statutes.
Página 40 - ... will petition, not rebel. Without this, it is easy to perceive that the union and harmony, which is peculiarly essential to a free society, whose members are resident in regions so very remote from each other, cannot long subsist. The genius, temper, and circumstances of the Americans should be also duly attended to. No people in the world have higher notions of liberty. It would be impossible ever to eradicate them, should an attempt so unjust be ever made...
Página 47 - ... redress through a liberal constitutional union with the mother state." ' Had this measure been adopted in the year 1766, in all probability the rights of America would have been restored, and the most perfect harmony would have this day subsisted between the two countries."' " Great pains have been taken by the American demagogues to delude the unhappy people whom they have doomed to be the dupes of their ambition, into a belief that no justice was to be obtained of his majesty and his houses...

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