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ambition after the ornaments and machinery of poetry. His craving after foreign help
perhaps shows the want of the internal impulse. His Elegy in a Country Churchyard,
which is the most simple, is the best of his productions.

CHURCHILL is a fine rough satirist. He had sense, wit, eloquence, and honesty.

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GOLDSMITH, both in verse and prose, was one of the most delightful writers in the language. His verse flows like a limpid stream. His ease is quite unconscious. Every thing in him is spontaneous, unstudied, unaffected, yet elegant, harmonious, graceful, nearly faultless. Without the point or refinement of Pope, he has more natural tenderness, a greater suavity of manner, a more genial spirit. Goldsmith never rises into sublimity, and seldom sinks into insipidity, or stumbles upon coarseness. His Traveller contains masterly national sketches. The Deserted Village is sometimes spun out into a mawkish sentimentality; but the characters of the Village Schoolmaster, and the Village Clergyman, redeem a hundred faults. His Retaliation is a poem of exquisite spirit, humour, and freedom of style.

ARMSTRONGʻS Art of Preserving Health displays a fine natural vein of sense and

poetry on a most unpromising subject.

CHATTERTON'S Remains show great premature power, but are chiefly interesting from his fate. He discovered great boldness of spirit and versatility of talent ; yet probably, if he had lived, would not have increased his reputation for genius.

THOMAS WARTON was a man of taste and genius. His Sonnets I cannot bely preferring to any in the language.

COWPER is the last of the English poets in the first division of this collection, but though last, not least. He is, after Thomson, the best of our descriptive poetsmore minute and graphical, but with less warmth of feeling and natural enthusiasm than the author of The Seasons. He has also fine manly sense, a pensive and interesting turn of thought, tenderness occasionally running into the most touching pathos, and a patriotic or religious zeal mounting almost into sublimity. He had great simplicity with terseness of style: his versification is neither strikingly faulty nor excellent. His occasional copies of verses have great elegance; and his John Gilpin is efic of the most humorous pieces in the language.

BURNS concludes the series of the Illustrious Dead; and one might be tempted to write an elegy rather than a criticism on him. In naïveté, in spirit, in characteristic humour, in vivid description of natural objects and of the natural feelings of the heart, he has left behind him no superior.

Some additions have been made in the Miscellaneous part of the volume, from the Lyrical effusions of the elder Dramatists, whose beauty, it is presumed, can never decay, whose sweetness can never cloy!

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CONTENT S.

.

95

Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, to the Lady

From Paradise Lost, Book I.

Geraldine

65

Book II.

101

The Lady Geraldine to Henry Howard Earl of Address to Light

109

Surrey

67 Satan's Journey to Earth

ibid.

Polyolbion-- The XV. Song

69 Satan's Address to the Sun

112

The XXVIII. Song of the same

72 Satan's Entrance into Paradise

ibid.

An Ode written in the Peak

77 | The Conversation of Adam and Eve

115

The Ballad of Agincourt

ibid. Eve's Dream

The Mask of Cupid

52 At Penshurst

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The Angel Raphael sent to warn Adam of his

ROCHESTER.

Danger

119

Love and Life

236

Raphael's Account of the Creation

120

Upon Drinking in a Bowl

ibid.

Adam's Account of Himself

122

A Song

ibid.

Reconciliation between Adam and Eve

123

A Letter from Artemisa in Town to Chloe in

Sentence pronounced on Adam and Eve

125

the Country

ibid.

Adam and Eve driven out of Paradise

127

A Satire against Mankind

239

From Paradise Regained—The Power of Beauty 128 Upon Nothing

240

Description of Greece

ibid.

An Epilogue

241

Comus, (a Mask)

129

An Epilogue

ibid.

On Shakspeare, 1630

137

Sonnets

ibid.

ROSCOMMON.

Horace's Art of Poetry

242

COWLEY.

POMFRET.

The Praise of Poetry

140

The Complaint

ibid. The Choice

246

The Country Mouse

141

DORSET.

To the Royal Society

142

248

Anacreontics

144 Song written at Sea

Knotting

ibid.

MARVELL.

Songs

249

Bermudas

147

PHILIPS.

To his Coy Mistress

ibid.

The Splendid Shilling

250

The Nymph complaining for the Death of her

Fawn

ibid.

HALIFAX,

The Drop of Dew

148

The Man of Honour

251

The Garden

149

The Gallery

ibid.

Verses written for the Toasting Glasses of the

252

Kit-cat Club, 1703

150

Upon the Hill and Grove at Bilborow

An Horatian Ode upon Cromwell's Return from

PARNELL,

Ireland

ibid.

The Book-worm

253

BUTLER.

An Allegory on Man

ibid.

The Hermit

254

Character of Hudibras and Ralpho

152

The Battle between Bruin and his Foes

157

PRIOR.

Hudibras's Heroes

159

An Epistle tó Fleetwood Shepherd, Esq. 257

The Adventure of the Riding

162

Another Epistle to the same

. ibid.

Description of Sidrophel and Whackum

163

To the Hon. Charles Montague, Esq.

259

Upon Critics who judge of modern Plays pre-

The Lady's Looking-glass

ibid.

cisely by the Rules of the Ancients 165

Love Disarmed

260

Satire upon the Licentious Age of Charles II. 166

The Dove

ibid.

Satire upon the Abuse of Human Learning 168

The Garland

261

262

SIR JOHN DENHAM.

An English Padlock

Hans Carvel

ibid.

Cooper's Hill

170 Paulo Purganti and his Wife

263

The Progress of Learning

172 Her Right Name

265

Down Hall (a Ballad)

ibid.

DRYDEN.

РОРЕ. .

Absalom and Achitophel

175

183 The Messiah

267

Religio Laici (an Epistle)

268

The Hind and the Panther

186 Windsor Forest

271

Mac Flecknoe

206 Ode on Solitude

ibid.

Epistle to Mr. Congreve

208 Essay on Criticism

277

Epistle to John Dryden, Esq.

ibid. The Rape of the Lock

Epistle to Sir Godfrey Kneller

210 Elegy to the Memory of an Unfortunate Lady 283

284

To the Memory of Mr. Oldham

211 | Eloisa to Abelard

287

Alexander's Feast

212 January and May; or, the Merchant's Tale

293

The Secular Masque

213 An Essay on Man

303

The Cock and the Fox

214 Moral Essays

312

Sigismonda and Guiscardo

220 Epistle to Mr. Addison

313

Theodore and Honoria

226 Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot

316

Cymon and Iphigenia

229 Satires and Epistles of Horace Imitated

327

Baucis and Philemon

234 | Epilogue to the Satires

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Rural Sports

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DYER.

Epistle to - Robert, Earl of Oxford and Earl

Mortimer

330 | Grongar Hill

422

Epistle to Mr. Jervas

331

Epistle to Miss Blount

ibid.

SHENSTONE.

Conclusion of the Dunciad

332 A Pastoral Ballad

424

The School Mistress

426

GAY.

Jemmy Dawson (a Ballad)

428

333

MALLET.

Trivia ; or, the Art of Walking the Streets of

Edwin and Emma

430

London

336

William and Margaret

431

Epistle to Mr. Pope

346

Sweet William's farewell to Black-eyed Susan 348

AKENSIDE.

Verses to be placed under the Picture of Sir

Richard Blackmore

ibid. Pleasures of Imagination

432

ibid.

YOUNG.

BLAIR.

On the Being of a God .

448

Against Procrastination

ibid.

The Grave

354

GRAY.

SWIFT.

Ode on a Distant Prospect of Eton College 449

Written in a Lady's Ivory Table Book

450

360 Hymn to Adversity

Mrs. Harris's Petition

ibid. Elegy written in a "Country Church-yard ibid.

To the Earl of Peterborow

361 The Progress of Poesy

451

Vanbrugh's House

ibid. The Bard (a Pindaric Ode)

452

Baucis and Philemon

363

CHURCHILL.

A Description of the Morning

364

A Description of a City Shower

ibid.) The Rosciad

454

Horace, Book I. Epistle VII.

365 The Prophecy of Famine

462

Horace, Book II. Satire VI.

366

GOLDSMITH.

A True and Faithful Inventory of the Goods

belonging to Dr. Swift, Vicar of Laracor 367 The Double Transformation (a Tale)

467

Cadenus and Vanessa

ibid. The Hermit (a Ballad)

468

An Elegy on the Death of Demar, the Usurer 374 The Traveller; or, a Prospect of Society

The Country Life

ibid. The Deserted Village

472

Mary the Cook Maid's Letter to Dr. Sheridan 375 | The Haunch of Venison

476

The Furniture of a Woman's Mind

376 Retaliation

477

On cutting down the Old Thom at Markei

ARMSTRONG.

ibid.

On the Death of Dr. Swift

377 The Art of Preserving Health

479

A Character

, Panegyric, and Description of the

CHATTERTON,

Legion Club

381

Bristowe Tragedie; or, the Dethe of Sir Charles

THOMSON.

Bawdin

495

Extracts from the Seasons

Mynstrelles Songe

384

498

The Castle of Indolence

394

WARTON.

406

Ode

500

To the Rev. Mr. Murdoch

ibid.

Sonnets

ibid.

ibid.

The Progress of Discontent

502

407

Hymn on Solitude

ibid.

COWPER.

Verses supposed to be written by Alexander

A, PHILIPS.

Selkirk

503

408 On the Death of Mrs. Throckmorton's Bullfinch 504

Epistle to the

Earl of Dorset

• 415 The Rose

ibid.

The Poet's New Year's Gift to Mrs. Throcki

COLLINS.

ibid.

416 Pairing-time Anticipated

505

418 The Dog and the Water Lily

ibid.

Ode on the Poetical Character

419 The Poet, the Oyster, and Sensitive Plant

506

ibid. On a Goldfinch starved to death in his Cage

ibid.

420 Translations from V. Bourne

ibid.

421 The Diverting History of John Gilpin

508

Ode on the Death of Mr. Thomson

ibid. On Rural Lights and Sounds

510

Pastoral Poems

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