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While vanquisht Thyrsis did conrend in vain, -»

Thence Corydon, young Corydm does reign ^

The best, the sweerest on our wondring Plain. *

The EIGHTH ECLOGUE. PHJ RMACEVfRIA.

Inglifh'J ly Mr. Stafford.

SAD Demon's and Alphesibaus Muse
I sing: to hear whose Nores the Herds refuse
Their needful Food, the salvage Lynxes gaze, -j .
And stopping Streams their prefllng warers raise, f
I sing sad Damon's and ^Alphesibœm Layes; *

And thou (wharever part is blest with thee,
The rough Timavus, or lllyrian Sea)
Smile on my Verse: is there in Fare an hour .
To swell my numbers with my Emperour 1
There is, and to the World there shall be known
A Verse, that Sophocles Might daign to own.
Amidst the Laurels on thy Front Divine, -%

Permit my humble Ivy wreath to twine: >

Thine was my earliest Musc,my latest shall be thine. *.
Night scarce was past, the Morn was yet so new,
And well pleas'J Herds yet roul'd upon the dew;
When Damon stretch'd beneath an Olive Lay, .
And fung, Rise Lucifet, and bring the Day:
Rise, rise, while Nifa's falshood I deplore, ,
And call those Gods to whom she vainly swore,
To hear,my sad expiring Muse and me, [mony.
Tp Manalus my Pipes and Muse tune all your har-

On Manalus stand ttver-ecchoing Groves,
Srill trusted with the harmless Shepherds loves: .
Here Pan resides,who sirst madeReeds and Verse agree.
To iUnalta my Pipes and. Muse tune all your harmony.

Mopsm is Sifn's choice; how just are Lovers fears > Now Mares with Grissins join, and following yeaxs Shall fee the Hound and Deer drink at a Spring. O worthy Bridegroom light thy Torch, and fling Thy Nuts, fee modest Hefpcr quits the Sky. ToM•tnatus my Pipes and Muse tune all your harmony.

0 happy Nymph, blest in a wondrous Choice, For Mopfus you conremn'd my Verse and Voice J For him my Beard was shaggy in your Eye; y For him, you laugh'd at every Deity. [mony. p To Mxnalmmy Pipes and Muse tune all your har- *

When sirst 1 saw thee young and charming too, 'Twas in the Fences, where out Apples grew. My thirreenth year was downy on my Chin, And hardly could my hands the lowest branches win; Mow did I gaze? how did I gazing die i ToAf«*Wt! my Pipes and Muse tune all your harmony.

1 know thee Love, on Mountains thou waft bred, And Thracian Rocks thy Infant fury fed:

Hard foul'd, and not of human Progeny. ToMænal»r my Pipes and Muse tune all your harmony.

Love taught the cruel Mother to imbrue Her hands in blood: 'twa? Love her Children flew: Was she more cruel, or more impious he! An impious Child was Love, a cruel Mother she.? To Muntdus my Pipes and Muse rnne all your har- ^ mony. *

Now ler the Lamb and Wolf no mote be foes, Let Oaks beat Peaches, and the Pine the Rose; From Reeds and Thystles, Balm and Amber spring, And Owles and Daws provoke the Swan to sing: Let Tityrm in Woods with Orphesu Vie, -j

And soft ^Arion on the Waves desie; [mony. C

To Mentlus my Pipes and Muse tune all your har-i

Let all be Ct,aot now, farewel ye Woods: From yon high Clisf, I'll plunge into the Floods. O Msu take this dismal Legacy, Mow cease my Pipes aud Muse,ccasc all your harmony,

Thus he. <Alphefibetus Song rehearse,
Ye sacred Nine, above my Rural Verse.
Bring Water, Altars bind with mystick Bands,
Burn Gums and Vervain, and lift high the Wands;
We'll mutter sacred Magick till it warms ■»

My icy Swain; 'tis Verse we want ; my charms, >
Return, return, return my Dafhnis to my Arms. »
By charms compell'd the trembling Moon descends,
And Circe chang'd, by charms, VlyjfeC Friends;
By Charms the Serpent burst: ye pow'rsul Charms
Return, return, return my Dafhnis to my Arms.

Behold his Image with three Fillets bound,
Which thrice I drag the sacred Altars round.
Unequal numbers please the Gods: My Charms
Return, return, return my Dafhnis to my Arms.

Three knots of treble colourM Silk we tye; Haste ^Amaryllis, knit 'em instantly: And fay, these, Venus, are thy Chains; my Charms, Return, return, return my Dafhnis to my Arms.

Just as before this Fire the Wax and Clay T
One melts, one hardens, let him waste away. >
Strew Corn and Salt, and burn those leaves of Bay. *
1 burn these Leaves, but he burns me: my Charms,
Return, return, return my Dafhnis to my Arms.
Let Daphnis rage as when the bellowing Kind,
Mad with desire, run round the Woods to find
Their Mates; when tir'd, their trembling Limbs

they lay
Near some cool Stream, nor mind the setting day:
Thus let him rage, uupitied too: my Charms,
Return, return, return my Dafhnis to my Arms.

These Garments once were my perfidious Swain's,
Which to the Earth I cast: Ah dear remains!
Ye owe my Dafhnis to his Nymph: My Charms,
Return, return, return my Dafhnis to my Arms.

Maris himself these Herbs from Vtntm brought,
Pcnms for every noble Poison sought;
Aided by these, he now a Wolf becomes,
Now draws the buried stalking from their Tombs,-

The Corn sromField to Field transports: My Charms, Return, return, return my Daphnis to my Arms.

Cast o'er your Head the Ashes in the Brook, Cast backward o'er your Head, nor turn your look. I strive, but Gods and Art he flights: My Charms, Return, return, return my Daphnis to my Arms.

Behold new Flames from the dead Ashes rife, -\ Blest be the Omen, blest the Prodigies,?

For Hyltx barks, shall we believe our Eyes? 3

Or do we Lovers dream ? cease, cease, my Charms, My Daphnis comes, he comes, he flies into my Arms.

the fame ECLOGUE.

By Mr. Cheiwood.

I Damon and ^tlpheus Loves recire,
The Shepherds envy, and the Fields delight:
Whom as they strove, the list'ning Heifers ttooi,.
Greedy to heat, forgetful of their Food;
They charm'd the rage of hungry Wolves, and led
The wandring Rivers from their wonred Bed.
I Damon and ^Alphem Loves recire,
The Shepherds Envy, and the Fields delight.
And you great Prince, whose Empire unconsin'd,
As Earth, and Seas, yet narrower than your Mind,
Whether you with Victorious Troops pass o'er
Timavus Rocks, or coast th' Ulyrian shore;
Shall I, beginning with these Rural Lays, •>

Irer my Muse to such Perfection raise, >

As without rashness to atrempt your Praise, •»

And thro' the subject World your Deeds rehearse.?
Deeds worthy ofthe Majesty of Verse!
My first Fruits now I to your Altar bring;
Ion, with a riper Mtisc, I last will sing.

Atean while among your Laurel wreaths allow "This Ivy branch to (hade your Conquering Brow.

Scarce had the Sun dispell'd the (hades of Night, Whilst dewy browz the Cattel does invite; When in a mournful posture, pale, and wan, The luckless Damon thus his plaints began.

Thou drowsie Star of Morning, come away, Come and lead forth the sacred Lamp of day; Whilst I by Nisd baffled and betray'd, Dying, to Heaven accuse the perjur'd Maid. But Prayers are all lost Breath ; the Powers above Give Dispensations for false Oaths in Love. Begin with me, my Flute, begin such strains, As Pan our Patron taught th.' Orcadian Swains. 'Tis a most blessed Place, that *4rcady.' And Shepherds bless'd, who in those Coverts lie '." Mustek and Love is all their Business there, Pan doth himself part in those Consorts bear: The Vocal Pines with clasping Arms conspire, To cool the Sun's, and fan their amorous Fire. Bfgin with me, my Flute, begin such strains, As Pan our Patron taught th' Orcadian Swains. Mopsui does Nisa a cheap Conquest gain, Presented, woo!d, betroth'd to me in vain. What hour secure, what respite to his Mind In this false World can a poor Lover find? Let Griffins Mares, and Eagles Turtles wooe, And tender Fawns the ravening Dogs pursue: These may indeed subject of wonder pibve, But nothing to this Prodigy of Love. Mopsm buy Torches: Hymen you must join; Bespeak our Bridt-Cake, Hesperm all is thine. Begin with me, my Flute, begin such strains, As Pan our Patron taught th' ^Arcadian Swains. A worthy Match, and just reward of Pride! Whilst you both Damon, and his Pipe deride! Too long my Beard, nor smooth enough my Face i And with my Puson, you my Flocks disgrace.

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