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I have a little looking-glass upon my parlour shelf,
If you'll step in one moment, dear, you shall behold

yourself." "I thank you, gentle sir,” she said, “ for what you're

pleased to say, And bidding you good morning now, I'll call another

day.”

The Spider turn'd him round about, and went into his

den, For well he knew the silly Fly would soon come back

again : So he wove a subtle web, in a little corner sly, And set his table ready, to dine upon the Fly. Then he came out to his door again, and merrily did sing, “Come hither, hither, pretty Fly, with the pearl and

silver wing; Your robes are green and purple—there's a crest upon

your head; Your eyes are like the diamond bright, but mine are

dull as lead!” Alas, alas ! how very soon this silly little Fly, Hearing his wily, flattering words, came slowly flitting by; With buzzing wings she hung aloft, then near and

nearer drew, Thinking only of her brilliant eyes, and green and

purple hue

Thinking only of her crested head-poor foolish thing!

at last, Up jump'd the cunning Spider, and fiercely held her

fast. He dragg'd her up his winding stair, into his dismal den, Within his little parlour—but she ne'er came out again ! And now, dear little children, who may this story read, To idle, silly, flattering words, I pray you ne'er give

heed : Unto an evil counsellor close heart and ear and eye, And take a lesson from this tale, of the Spider and the

Fly

[graphic]

WE ARE SEVEN.

A SIMPLE Child,
That lightly draws its breath,
And feels its life in every limb,
What should it know of death?

I met a little cottage Girl:
She was eight years old, she said;
Her hair was thick with many a curl
That clustered round her head.

She had a rustic, woodland air,
And she was wildly clad:
Her eyes were fair, and very fair;
-Her beauty made me glad.

“Sisters and brothers, little Maid, How many may you be?" “How many ? Seven in all,” she said, And wondering looked at me.

“And where are they? I pray you tell.”
She answered, “Seven are we;
And two of us at Conway dwell,
And two are gone to sea.

Two of us in the churchyard lie,
My sister and my brother;
And, in the churchyard cottage, I
Dwell near them with my mother."
“You say that two at Conway dwell,
And two are gone to sea,
Yet ye are seven !-I pray you tell,
Sweet Maid, how this may be.”
Then did the little Maid reply,
“ Seven boys and girls are we;
Two of us in the churchyard lie,
Beneath the churchyard tree.'

“You run about, my little Maid,
Your limbs they are alive;
If two are in the churchyard laid,
Then ye are only five."
“ Their graves are green, they may be seen,'
The little Maid replied,
“Twelve steps or more from my mother's door,
And they are side by side.
My stockings there I often knit,
My kerchief there I hem ;
And there upon the ground I sit-
I sit and sing to them.

And often after sun-set, Sir,
When it is light and fair,
I take my little porringer,
And eat my supper there.
The first that died was sister Jane;
In bed she moaning lay,
Till God released her of her pain ;
And then she went away.
So in the churchyard she was laid ;
And when the grass was dry,
Together round her grave we played,
My brother John and I.
And when the ground was white with snow,
And I could run and slide,
My brother John was forced to go,
And he lies by her side."
“How many are you then,” said I,
“If they two are in heaven?”
Quick was the little Maid's reply,
"O Master! we are seven.”

“But they are dead; those two are dead ! Their spirits are in heaven!” ’T was throwing words away : for still The little Maid would have her will, And said, “Nay, we are seven ! ”

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