Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volumen105

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William Blackwood, 1869
 

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Página 100 - God hath chosen the foolish things of the world to confound the wise, and the weak things of the world to confound the things which are mighty...
Página 681 - Never literary attempt was more unfortunate than my Treatise of Human Nature. It fell dead-born from the press, without reaching such distinction, as even to excite a murmur among the zealots.
Página 499 - I have another and a far brighter vision before my gaze. It may be but a vision; but I will cherish it. I see one vast confederation stretching from the frozen North in unbroken line to the glowing South, and from the wild billows of the Atlantic westward to the calmer waters of the Pacific main ; and I see one people and one language and one law and one faith, and over all that wide continent the home of freedom and a refuge for the oppressed of every race and of every clime.
Página 681 - I dine, I play a game of backgammon, I converse, and am merry with my friends; and when, after three or four hours...
Página 15 - But, say you, surely there is nothing easier than for me to imagine trees, for instance, in a park, or books existing in a closet, and nobody by to perceive them. I answer, you may so, there is no difficulty in it ; but what is all this, I beseech you, more than framing in your mind certain ideas which you call books and trees, and at the same time omitting to frame the idea of any one that may perceive them?
Página 228 - Who is on my side? who?" And there looked out to him two or three eunuchs. And he said, "Throw her down." So they threw her down: and some of her blood was sprinkled on the wall, and on the horses : and he trode her under foot.
Página 22 - A Proposal for the Better Supplying of Churches in our Foreign Plantations, and for Converting the Savage Americans to Christianity by a College to be Erected in the Summer Islands, Otherwise Called the Isles of Bermuda . . . London, 1724 '[ Fothergill, John].
Página 24 - In happy climes, the seat of innocence, Where nature guides and virtue rules, Where men shall not impose for truth and sense The pedantry of courts and schools : There shall be sung another golden age, The rise of empire and of arts, The good and great inspiring epic rage, The wisest heads, and noblest hearts.
Página 680 - The intense view of these manifold contradictions and imperfections in human reason has so wrought upon me, and heated my brain, that I am ready to reject all belief and reasoning, and can look upon no opinion even as more probable or likely than another.
Página 647 - Lives of the Queens of Scotland, and English Princesses connected with the Regal Succession of Great Britain.

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