Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

or were a Robertson to come amongst the Independents what hooting there would be from some quarters. We are expressing no opinion of the orthodoxy of the reverend and illustrious thinkers we have named; we only say, that the establishment allows greater freedom and independency of pulpit utterance than any of the sects would easily tolerate. Dissent talks much about liberty of judgment and teaching and is too weak to act it out; the Church talks much of uniformity, and yet nobly tolerates the greatest diversity. All honor to it for this ! We do not believe in Puseyism, nor Bickerstethism, nor even in Mauriceism, but we respect that part of an Ecclesiastical system which admits of such a diversity of manifestations.

These remarks are suggested by the volumes heading this article.

Mr. Smith's sermons remind us of some of the best discourses of Melville. There is the same habit of seizing upon some one truth in the text, bringing it out into new and interesting combinations, throwing the discussion into an argumentative mould, and ringing out the idea in the music of lofty language. These sermons have life in them, and they will live and generate living thoughts in thoughtful readers. There is no mawkish evangelism, no screaming rhapsodies, no ecclesiastical narrowness, no pulpiteering tricks here: every sermon bespeaks independency of research, vigor of intellect, and a reverent, catholic, manly, Christianity.

WESTMINSTER CHAPEL PULPIT. REPORTS OF SERMONS by the Rev.

UEL M TIN. Third Edition. George Hill, W stminster Road, London.

MANY years ago, when at college, we read some religious discourses of a transtalantic divine, and their power over us was of the most imperial order. The author, whom we had never seen, we invested with attributes of perfection of every kind. Our imagination gave him a majestic form, a "face divine,” a voice of music, an elocution perfect, and an eloquence of the most royal type. Years rolled on, and the time came that we actually saw him in the pulpit and heard him, and our idol fell at once from its pedestal. There was a coarseness in the manner, a dogmatism in the spirit, a nasalness in the voice, which produced a kind of revulsion. His books are little or nothing to us now. This is weak you will say, but we cannot help it, and we are sorry for it. The fact is the man was made to influence by writing not by speaking. The very opposite of all this is the case with Mr. Martin ; as a speaker he is mighty, as a writer he is not so

strong.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic]

HOMIL Y

ON

Hereditary Principle in God's Government of Humanity.

lean ye, that ye use this proverb concerning the land of *ng, the fathers have eaten sour grapes, and the children's

et on edge ? As I live, saith the Lord God, ye shall not ion any more to use this proverb in Israel.” Ezek. xviii. 2, 3. ose days they shall say no more, the fathers have eaten s, and the children's teeth are set on edge." Jer. xxxi. 29.

T is not difficult to conceive of moral existences both uninfluenced and uninfluenceable by other finite intelligences. Neither those who existed

before they came into being, nor those who are contemporaries, may exert any influence whatever upon

character, condition, or destiny, independent of their free and deliberate choice. They are the subjects of no sunt either of entailed good or evil. They are the sole hitects of their own fortunes. Their condition is always ? conscious result of their own unbiased choice and spontapus action. Each moves in an orbit, whose distance from 3 nearest neighbour is so immensely vast as to render any fluence being imparted, or communicated to the most coniguous impossible. The only connexion with other creatures being connexion with the common centre, the ABSOLUTE ONE.

But whilst it is possible to conceive of such creatures, there is no reason to believe that they have any actual

Vol. IX.

2 A

THE WORKS OF JOHN ANGELL JAMES. Two Volumes. SERMONS.

London: Hamilton, Adams and Co.

Many thousands of religious people will, we have no doubt, be glad to possess a good edition of all the productions of this well known writer and popular non-conformist preacher. The Work before us, of which there are two volumes, seems to be, as far as execution is concerned, all that can be desired. The strong temptation we have felt when reading some of these sermons to assume the critic and to pronounce judicially upon some things that seem to us very objectionable, both in the author's sentiments and style, has been checked by the love we have for his memory, and the high appreciation of the noble services which in many ways he has rendered the race. Love interdicts criticism, and we would ever be her loyal liege.

OF

Two volumes. By W. G. BARRETT,

SKELETONS SERMONS.

London : Thomas Jepps.

SINCE“the Homilist” has appeared, pulpit“skeletops” have come forth in almost every form, and under every name. Congregational, British, Temperance, Wesleyan, Unitarian, and lastly, as if by a sly insinuation, to condemn the orthodoxy of all the rest, the Evangelical, which by the way, is the most watery of all the watery things that come before us in the form of sermons. Far are we from regretting the multiplication pulpit helps. We view them not as rivals, we hail them as co-operators. Mr. Barrett's are amongst the best.

GLEANINGS FROM GOSPEL STORY; OR, New TESTAMENT NARRATIVES

EXPLAINED AND ILLUSTRATED. With Preface by Rev. W. B.

MACKENZIE, M.A. Knight and Son. This little book, issued from the pen of a known Christian writer, whose diffidence leading him in this case to conceal his name, is somewhat mysterious. It appears to be of recent growth, as he is already known; and it were surely otherwise superfluous, as he has gleaned in the best field with diligence and skill..

A

H OMIL Y

ON

The Hereditary Principle in God's

Government of Humanity.

“What mean ye, that ye use this proverb concerning the land of Israel, saying, the fathers have eaten sour grapes, and the children's teeth are set on edge ? As I live, saith the Lord God, ye shall not have occasion any more to use this proverb in Israel.” Ezek. xviii. 2, 3.

"In those days they shall say no more, the fathers have eaten sour grapes, and the children's teeth are set on edge.” Jer. xxxi. 29.

T is not difficult to conceive of moral existences both uninfluenced and uninfluenceable by other finite intelligences. Neither those who existed

before they came into being, nor those who are their contemporaries, may exert any influence whatever upon their character, condition, or destiny, independent of their own free and deliberate choice. They are the subjects of no amount either of entailed good or evil. They are the sole architects of their own fortunes. Their condition is always the conscious result of their own unbiased choice and spontaneous action. Each moves in an orbit, whose distance from its nearest neighbour is so immensely vast as to render any influence being imparted, or communicated to the most contiguous impossible. The only connexion with other creatures being connexion with the common centre, the ABSOLUTE ONE.

But whilst it is possible to conceive of such creatures, there is no reason to believe that they have any actual

Vol. IX.

2 A

« AnteriorContinuar »