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Day

Bank Tindia 3 per Ct 3 perCt 4 perCt 5 perCty sperC Stock. Stock. Red An Cons. Cons, Ann.

1797.

Long Ann,

Short Imper. Tıper. Ann, 13 perCil Ann.

Om- Eng.Lot Irish Irish Old nium. Tickets. Lot.T. 5 perCt Ann.

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PRICES of STOCK'S from Sept. 28 to Oct. 25.

85

101$ 100

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101

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1803 IS 16 17 1813 18 Sund.

(This Table contains the highest Price cach Day.

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POSTSCRIPT.

SATURDAY MORNING, OCT.31. ÁLL political intelligence from the Continent becomes every day less interesting, as the public mind seems entirely occupied in the important question of pacification. Marquis CORNWALLIS will certainly set off for France early in the ensuing week, and remain at Paris until after the general festival, which is to be held there on the 9th of November, in celebration of the peace. His Lordship's visit to Amiens will not take up much time, as it is ascertained, that the great points of the definitive treaty have been settled to the satisfaction of the two governments. The meeting of the plenipotentiaries will be more a matter of form than of business. The basis of a commercial treaty with France, in which the Batavian Republic is to be comprehended, has been also laid down, and will, in all probability, be signed at the same time.

1

The unanimity with which the address, in both Houses of Par. liament, have been voted for his MAJESTY's Speech, must be peculiarly gratifying to the general sentiment, and to the feelings of ministers. They possess just claims to the gratitude of the country for the wisdom and promptitude with which they have realized their pacific professions.

This unanimity has, however, been obtained by the omission of the addresses of the commendation passed upon the terms of the treaty in the speech. His MAJESTY trusts, " that this important artangement will be found conducive to the substantial intere:ts of this country, and honourable to the British character;" and the Lords and Commons merely say, that “they learn, with great satisfaction, that preliminaries of peace have been signed with the French Republic.

Whatever may be the sentiments of individuals, both in and out of parliament, with respect to the nature of the conditions, there can be no doubt, that the treaty will be sanctioned by a vast majority of the nation, and its representatives.

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ORNAMENTED WITH A PORTRAIT OF THE REV. RICHARD GRAVES.

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ORIGINAL POETRYO: 1332

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Eontents.
MISCELLANEOUS:

LITERATURE. - MONTHLY
History of the Union .. 283

REVIEW Sketch of the Life of the Revo:

Storch's Picture of Fetersburgh 321
Richard Graves, 283 | Sep

Sentimental Beauties from Dr. ?
Blait

328 Account of a Descent ingo

as the 291 Turner's Classical Geography iba Account of the Russian Baths. 295

Thespian Dictionary, Military Force of the Turkish

Eccentric Biography Empire : 296 | Aphorisóds for Youch

381 Account of the Burial of King ....

Charles the First, and Oliver
Cromwell

299 L'Union
Auempi io restraint Luxury, 4. 302 Acon and Leooilla:
The Classical Enthusiast

Epigram

ib. Copy of a Letter to Oliver

Canzonet
Cromwell..

...304 On the Death of a beloved Fe.
Coronation at Moscow
3052 male Friend

ib, Account of the Scotch High

To the Redbreast

ib.' Janders

310 Introduction of Christianity..

PUBLIC AMUSEMENTS, &c. among the Russians... 311

Folly as it Flies

334 Drury Lane

335 King's Theatre

336 GLEANINGS. Union Clubia

ib. Learning .315. Parisian 'Theatricals

ib. Inactivity

.ib. Commerce, Useful Atos, &c. - 3373 Pleasure. 190.316

Prizes for Stock Cattle.......338 Speculation and Practice ... tab. India Shipping.ob.'' 46 Vails

labak...ib. Controversies,

:917 POLITICAL MISCELLANY. Distinction ib. Expedition to St. Domingo .

339 House of Loids

340 House of Commons

344 ANECDOTES. , Parisian Feterli

347 Richard Cromwell ...2...318 La Motte.i.

ib, DOMESTIC OCCURRENCES. Dr. Frend and Dr. Mead fib.

Births and Marriages

351 Marshal Saxc 319 Obituary :

ib.I Chevalier Bayard .b. Price of Grain: ::.

ib. Dr. John Radcliffe 320 Price of Stock

d. 3521

London:

T PUBLISHED BY J. WALKER,

PATERVOSTER ROW. Sold by Lackington, Allen, and Co. Finsbury-Square ; Vernot and Hood, in the Poultry; . I 1. Hurst, Paternoster-Row; W. Chapple, Pall-Mall; R. Rvan, Oxford-Street ; J. Archer, and B. Dugrale, Dublin; and by all the Booksellers

throughoui the United Kingdom.

J. Cundee, Printer, Ivg-lane.

J. G's suggestions are entitled to our sincere thanks. His proposal of a regular summary of all the great events which have taken place from the commencement of hostilities to the concla sion of peace, is under consideration.

We must once more remark, in answer to the repeated applications of JUNIUS Redivivus, that the UNION MAGAZINE shall never be made the instrument of political squabbles or personal animosity

Our correspondent, TISIPHONE, would not be in such a fury were he to consider the great rise in the price of paper since the commencement of the publication.

Mr. P. may be supplied with the sheet, left out by the binder, by applying to the publisher.

TO OUR READERS.

* * Our readers will observe that we have omitted this month the additional engraving, which we have been in the custom of giving. This omission, we beg leave lo assure them, does not arise from any wish on the part of the proprietors to contract their expences, but from an earnest desire to render the publicae tion still more worthy of the liberal and extensive patronage with which it is honoured. They have, therefore, determined to give, every three months, instead of monthly, an engraving, executed in the best possible manner, and descriptive of some object of superior interest. They will also, by this arrangement, have the satisfaction of obviating complaints occasioned by the want of punctuality an the part of the engraver, which has some months prevented the publication of the work at a period as early as they wished...

The cessation of almost every kind of important political intel. ligence from the continent, necessarily calls for the omission of the Postcript, which our subscribers will recollect was originally devoted to that purpose. Should, however, any event of real moment unexpectedly occur, it shall be noticed in the usual way.

THE

UNION MAGAZINE,

AND

IMPERIAL REGISTER.

No. XI.-NOVEMBER, 1801.

HISTORY OF THE UNION WITH IRELAND.

(Continued from Page 215 of our last )

owners.

MR. Arthur Moore maintained, that though parliament might assume the power, it had not the right to change, much less to abrogate altogether the constitution of the land, of which they were only the delegated functionaries, and not the exclusive

He contended, if, by the violent exercise of the abstract power of parliament to do that, to which its moral competence was insufficient, the measure of a Union should be carried against the sense of the people, that in such a case the laws of the incora porated legislature would not bind Ireland, and that then the question of resistance would, in the words of Mr. Fox, be no longer a question of morality, but of prudence. If these were deemed strong doctrines, it was incumbent to enquire who had forced them from him? Those who had made a most atrocious attack upon the independent parliament of the country, which he was sworn to defend, as part of the existing constitution, in which no man was altogether sui suris, but a trustee for the rights of others, whose boast and birthright it was.

He would put that case, although it had not been yet stated, notwithstanding the various hypotheses advanced upon the wild project of destroying their excellent practical establishment. Suppose it were proposed to reduce the number of members in either house of parliament, or to reduce the number of members in that house to one hundred, would any man hear it without inlignation? Would the nation be bound to submit to it, should the

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