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HISTORY

OF

THE PERSIAN WARS,

FROM

HERODOTUS.

Vol. n.

London:

Printed by A. Spottiswooue,

New-Street-Square.

THE

HISTORY

OF

THE PERSIAN WARS,

FROM

HERODOTUS.

WITH

ENGLISH NOTES,

EXAMINATION QUESTIONS, AND INDEXES.

BY CHARLES WILLIAM STOCKER, D.D.

FORMERLY FELLOW OF ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE, AND LATE PROFESSOR OF MORAL
PHILOSOPHY IN THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD.

SECOND EDITION.
IN TWO VOLUMES.

VOL. II.
LONDON:

PRINTED FOR

LONGMAN, BROWN, GREEN, AND LONGMANS,

PATERNOSTER-ROW.
1843.

[graphic]

POLYHYMNIA.

ARGUMENT OF THE SEVENTH BOOK.

Egypt revolts: 1. Darius names Xerxes for his successor, and dies in the midst of preparations for war: 2—4. Xerxes is pressed to invade Greece by Mardonius, Demaratus, and others: 5 ; 6. The revolt is quelled: 7. Xerxes proposes in council an expedition against Greece; Mardonius speaks in approval of the measure, which Artabanus opposes: 8—11. The king, in spite of a dream, changes his determination; the vision appears again to him, and also to his uncle, who now urges the invasion: 12—19. Great preparations; Athos is dug through: 20—25. Xerxes begins his march. Pythius: 26—31. The Hellespontine bridges are destroyed by a storm, but rebuilt: 32—36. March from Sardis to Abydos. Review of the forces. Conversation between the king and Artabanus, who is left as viceroy: 37—53. Passage over the bridges. March to Doriscus. Numbering of the army: 54—60. Commanders-in-chief of the forces. The ' immortal 'band: 82; 83. Generals of the cavalry: 87; 88. Triremes: 89. Marines: 96. Commanders of the fleet: 97. Artemisia: 99. Review of the army: 100. Conversation of Xerxes with Demaratus: 101—104. Mascames. Boges: 105—107. March from Doriscus to Acanthus, the fleet coasting along shore: 108—120. There the army and navy separate, and meet again at Therma: 121—127. Xerxes surveys the mouth of the Peneus: 128—130. His heralds return ; none had been now sent to Sparta or Athens: 131—133. Discord among the Greeks: 138. The Athenians were the saviours of Greece: 139. Oracles; which Themistocles interprets: 140—143. Preparations of the Greeks: 144—147. Argos declines any alliance: 148—152. Unsuccessful embassy to Gelon: 153; 156—167. Duplicity of the Corcyraeans: 168. Crete remains neutral: 169. The Thessalians are necessitated to join the Persians: 171—174. The Greek congress resolves to defend Thermopylae, and to station the fleet at Artemisium: 175—178. Hostilities commence by sea: 179—183. Numerical strength of the invaders: 184—187. A storm: 188—191. Naval manoeuvres: 192—195. Xerxes marches to Trachis. A little band under Leonidas occupies the pass: 196; 198—209. Battle of Thermopylae. Treachery of Epialtes. Fall of Leonidas. His countryn en sell their lives dearly. The Thebans are made slaves: 210—213; 215—233. Conversation of Xerxes and Demaratus: 234—237. The body of Leonidas is mutilated: 238. Demaratus had sent to Sparta intelligence of this invasion: 239.

Herod. Vol. II.

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