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ference to much more distant time (Exod. xiii. 5 ; Deut. vi. 20; Josh. iv. 6). It might be simply taken as afterwards. The circumstance of the speedy withering of the flowers and leaves of the keroa should not be slightly passed over ; nor that of its present name, cicinum (pronouncing the c hard, like k), which is sufficiently near the kikiun of Jonah. The author of “ Scripture Illustrated” remarks, as the history of Jonah expressly says, the Lord prepared this plant, no doubt we may conceive of it as an extraordinary one of its kind, remarkably rapid in its growth, remarkably hard in its stem, remarkably vigorous in its branches, and remarkable for the extensive spread of its leaves and the deep gloom of their shadow ; and, after a certain duration, remarkable for a sudden withering, and a total uselessness to the impatient prophet.”

THE HEATH.—“He shall be like the heath in the desert,” says the prophet, “he shall not see when good cometh ; but shall inhabit the parched places in the wilderness, a salt land” (Jer. xvii. 6.) And again,-"Flee, save yourselves, and be like the heath in the wilderness ” (ch. xlviii. 6.) But what plant is this heath? The Septuagint and the Vulgate say,

“a tamarisk ”; others, a leafless tree”; ind Parkhurst quotes from Mr. Taylor, “ a blasted ree, stripped of its foliage.” If it be a particular lant, he thinks the tamarisk as likely as any, ecause these trees have not much beauty to reommend them, their branches being produced in so traggling a manner, as not, by any art, to be rained up regularly; and their leaves are commonly ain upon their branches, and fall away in winter, o that there is nothing to recommend them but their address. “But the question presents itself," says Mr. Taylor, “Can the tamarisk live in a salt land ? in parched places?" He thinks not, and therefore proposes to seek the Hebrew orur among the lichens, a species of plants which are the last productions of vegetation, under the severe cold of the frozen zone, and under the glowing heats of the equatorial deserts; so that it seems best qualified to endure parched places, and a salt land.

Hasselquist mentions several kinds seen by him in Egypt, Arabia, and Syria, as does also Mr. Burckhardt, in the peninsula of Mount Sinai.

VI.

BIBLICAL NATURAL HISTORY.

ZOOLOGY

BY

WILLIAM CARPENTER,

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AUTHOR OF

“ THE GEOLOGY, ZOOLOGY, AND BOTANY OF THE BIBLE,” " CALENDARIUM PALESTINÆ,” AND OTHER BIBLICAL WORKS.

“ How manifold are thy works, O Lord !

In wisdom hast thou made them all ;
The earth is filled with thy riches !
The sea, also, great and wide!
Therein move creatures innumerable-
Living creatures, small and great.
Thou sendest forth thy breath, they are created,
And thou dost renew the face of the earth!”

PSALM civ. 24-30.

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3 3 5, STRAND, W. C.

MDCCCLXVIII.

LONDON: PRINTED BY WERTHEIMER, LEA AND CO.

FINSBURY CIRCUS.

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