"Fiction Distorting Fact": The Prison Life, Annotated by Jefferson Davis

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Mercer University Press, 1987 - 168 páginas
This new study of 'Prison life' places the work and these two years in proper perspective. Davis was imprisoned and Craven was assigned to be his physician, not much more than that should be accepted as fact. This edition reproduces Davis's annotations and comments from his personal copy, along with editorial notes and explanations. It also provides a clear, objective description of Davis's life at Fort Monroe, based on evidence and Davis's own letters from prison.

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Contenido

P R E FA C E vii C H A P T E R 6
xi
An Introduction by Anecdote The Oldfashioned Pref
1
gles My First Visit to the Prisoner Mr Davis on Gen Butler and Dutch Gap He Denies
10
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Jefferson Davis was born in Kentucky but grew up in Mississippi. After graduating from West Point in 1828, he served at frontier military posts and in the Black Hawk War. He resigned from the military in 1835. For the next 10 years, he managed his brother's isolated plantation in Mississippi. In 1845, he entered the world of politics as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives. Davis's reputation as a historian rests on one work - The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government (1878-81), an account based in large measure on his own intimate experiences. Chosen by the provisional congress as president of the Confederate States of America in 1861, Davis faced criticism throughout his tenure. After Lee surrendered without his approval, Davis was indicted by the federal government for treason. Although he spent several years in prison, he was never brought to trial. In 1867, he was released on bond, and he retired to his estate, Beauvoir, on the Gulf of Mexico in Mississippi. There he wrote The Rise and Fall to vindicate the South in general and his presidency in particular.

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