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And their place is not known. Below, vast caves
Shine in the rushing torreut's restless gleam,
Which from those secret chasms in tumult welling
Meet in the Vale, and one majestic River,
'The breath and blood of distant lands, for ever
Rolls its loud waters to the ocean waves,
Breathes its swift vapours to the circling air.

y.

Mont Blanc yet gleams on high :-the power is

there, The still and solemn power of many sights And many sounds, and much of life and death. In the calm darkness of the moonless nights, In the lone glare of day, the snows descend Upon that mountain ; none beholds them there, Nor when the flakes burn in the sinking sun, Or the star-beams dart through them ;— winds

contend Silently there, and heap the snow, with breath Rapid and strong, but silently! Its home The voiceless lightning in these solitudes Keeps innocently, and like vapour broods Over the snow. The secret strength of things, Which governs thought, and to the infinite dome Of heaven is as a law, inhabits thee! And what were thou, and earth, and stars, and sea if to the human mind's imaginings Silence and solitude were vacancy

?

SWITZERLAND, June 23, 1816.

NOTE ON POEMS OF 1816.

BY THE EDITOR.

SHELLEY wrote little during this year. The poem entitled The Sunset” was written in the spring of the year, while still residing at Bishopsgate. He spent the summer on the shores of the Lake of Geneva. “The Hymn to Intellectual Beauty" was conceived during his voyage round the lake with Lord Byron. He occupied himself during this voyage, by reading the Nouvelle Héloise for the first time. The reading it on the very spot where the scenes are laid, added to the interest; and he was at once surprised and charined by the passionate eloquence and earnest enthralling interest that pervades this work. There was something in the character of Saint-Preux, in his abnegation of self, and in the worship he paid to Love, that coincided with Shelley's own disposition; and, though differing in many of the views, and shocked by others, yet the effect of the whole was fascinating and delightful.

“ Mont Blanc" was inspired by a view of that mountain and its surrounding peaks and valleys, as he lingered on the Bridge of Arve on his way through the Valley of Chamouni. Shelley makes the following mention of this poem in his publication of the History of Six Weeks' Tour, and Letters from Switzerland:-" The Poem entitled Mont Blanc,' is written by the author of the two letters from Chamouni and Vevai. It was composed under the immedinte impression of the deep and powerful feelings excited by the objects which 't attempts to describe; and as an undiscip'ined overflowing

of the soul, rests its claim to approbation on an attempt to imitate the untamable wildness and inaccessible solemnity from whick those feelings sprang."

This was an eventful year, nd less time was given to study than usual. In the list of his reading I find, in Greek, Theocritus, the Prometheus of Æschylus, several of Plu. tarch's Lives, and the works of Lucian ; in Latin, Lucretius, Pliny's Letters, the Annals and Germany of Tacitus; in French : the History of the French Revolution, by Lacretelle. He read for the first time, this year, Montaigne's Essays, and regarded them ever after as one of the most delightful and instructive books in the world. The list is scanty in English works-Locke's Essay, Political Justice, and Coleridge's Lay Sermon, form nearly the whole. It was his frequent habit to read aloud to me in the evening ; in this way we read, this year, the New Testament, Paradise Lost, Spenser's Fairy Queen, and Don Quixote.

POEMS WRITTEN IN 1817.

PRINCE ATHANASE.

A FRAGMENT.

PART I.

There was a youth, who, as with toil and travel Had grown quite weak and gray before his time Nor

any could the restless griefs unravel

Which burned within him, withering up his prime And goading him, like fiends, from land to land. Not his the load of any secret crime,

For nought of ill his heart could understand,
But pity and wild sorrow for the same ;
Not his the thirst of glory or command,

Baffled with blast of hope-consuming shame;
Nər evil joys which fire the vulgar breast,
And quench in speedy smoke its feeble flame,

Had left within his soul the dark unrest:
Nor what religion fables of the grave
Feared he,--Philosoplıy's accepted guest,

For none than ha a purer heart could have,
Or that loved good more for itself alone;
Of nought in licaven or earth was he the slave.

What sorrow, strange, and shadowy, and unknown, Sent him, a hopeless wanderer, through man

kind ?If with a human sadness he did groan,

IIc had a gentle yet aspiring mind;
Just, innocent, with varied learning fed ;
And such a glorious consolation find

In others' joy, when all their own is dead :
He loved and laboured for his kind in grief,
And yet, unlike all others, it is said

That from such toil he never found relief.
Although a child of fortune and of power,
Of an ancestral name the orphan chief,

His soul had wedded wisdom, and her dower
Is love and justice, clothed in which he sate
Apart from men, as in a lonely tower,

Pitying the tumult of their dark estate.
Yet even in youth did he not e'er abuse
The strength of wealth or thought, to consecrate

Those false opinions which the harsh rich use To blind the world they famish for their pride ; Nor did he hold from any man his dues,

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