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XIV. high large light loose loud poor pure quick rare rich right rough sharp short slow smooth snug soft split strong sure swift tight tough true

vain warm white wild wrong

black blind bold bright brisk broad brown burnt cheap chief clean clear cleft coarse cross dear dull dumb faint fair fierce good great green grey

bro-ken cru-el drear-y ea-ger earn-est emp-ty fool-ish fo-reign gen-tle heart-y heav-y hol-low hon-est hor-rid hun-gry i-dle jeal-ous la-zy lit-tle

man-y nar-row per-fect pleas-ant pret-ty prop-er

bleach bleat blow boil brew bruise build cast catch chew choose cleave climb close clothe come could crack deal

I.

pur-ple read-y se-cret se-cure stead-y sub-tle

su-preme thirst-y tho-rough use-ful wick-ed yel-low

XV
draw
drown
dwell
earn
feel
fetch
fight
float
freeze
gleam
grate
graze
grieve
growl
guess
gush
hear
hurt
join

jump
knead
knock
know
laugh
leap
lift
look
love
move
mourn
neigh
peep
perch
pick
plait
please
pluck
pour

think thresh touch trim twist want watch wear work would wrap write

pull raise reign scream search seek seize serve sew shear shew should skim skip soak spare spin spread strain stretch strip swim talk teach tease tempt thank

al-low an-swer ap-pear a-void be-lieve bur-y car-ry com-mand con-trive COV-er COV-et cre-ate de-sire de-spise

de-stroy di-rect di-vide em-ploy en-joy fol-low gath-er lis-ten med-dle per-ceive per-suade prac-tise pro-vide reck-on rel-ish re-ceive re-lieve re-ply re-quire re-side scat-ter set-tle suf-fer sur-prise ven-ture whis-per whis-tle

LESSON 1.

Car-ry-ing
Con-stant-ly
Eu-rope
Flat-ten-ed
Hard-en-ed

Mer-ri-est
Min-utes
Ska-ting
Swe-den
Wrap-ped.

WHAT I SAW IN SWEDEN. MANY years ago I spent a winter in Sweden, which is a country in the north of Europe. This season is very long there, much longer than our winter.

Perhaps you may like to hear how Swedish children amuse themselves during this long cold time? I daresay you sometimes think that the winter is very cold in England ; bui

on

it is much colder in Sweden, and yet the children there look upon this as the merriest time of the year. Very often often the

snow is the ground for months together, and sometimes it is so deep, that it stands up on each side of the road like a great white wall.

When the frost has hardened the snow a little, you may see the children setting out, wrapped up very warm, carrying their skates in one hand, and dragging their little sledge after them with the other.

Perhaps you will say, “What is a sledge ?" I think if you asked a little Swedish child such a question, he would feel quite sorry for you, for to him a sledge is the most charming thing in the world.

I suppose that most of you have seen a pair of skates ? have perhaps seen a pair of pattens. The foot part of a skate does not, like the foot part of a patten, rest upon an iron ring, but upon a polished steel bar, placed on edge, and reaching from

If not, you

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