Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

cried out in her sufferings. The jailor asked her, if she cried out now, how would she endure a violent death on the morrow.

To-day," she replied, “I suffer what is ordinary, and have only ordinary assistance; to-morrow I am to suffer what is more than ordinary, and I shall have more than ordinary assistance.” And so it proved.

Which thou must learn at all times to call for by diligent prayer.

Endeavour to make yourselves acquainted with your weakness and necessities: and whatever you stand in need of, make it the subject of prayer to God.

A lady was once asked how she reconciled prayer to God for particular blessings, with absolute resignation to the Divine Will. “Very easily,” answered the lady: “just as if I were to offer a petition to a monarch, of whose kindness and wisdom I had the highest opinion. In such a case, my language would be, I wish you to bestow on me such or such a favor; but your majesty knows better than I, how far it would be agreeable to you, or right in itself, to grant my desire. I therefore content myself with humbly presenting my petition, and leave the event of it entirely to you.

God will grant you what is necessary for “life and godliness,” and with respect to all other things “make your requests known unto God,” but leave it in his hands to grant or deny.

Bishop Taylor remarks, “I have seen a lark rising from his bed of grass and soaring upwards, singing as he rises, and hopes to get to heaven, and climb above the clouds; but the poor bird was beaten back with the loud sighings of an eastern wind, and his motion made irregular and inconstant, descending more at every breath of the tempest, than it could recover by the libration and frequent weighing of his wings; till the little creature was forced to sit down and pant, and stay till the storm was over; and then it made a prosperous flight, and did rise and sing, as if it had learned music and motion from an angel, as he passed sometimes through the air, about his ministries here below: so is the prayer of a good man.” This is diligent prayer; and he who would hold communion with God, and enjoy his presence, must not suffer himself to be beaten back by wandering thoughts, or

It may be, that in the eyes of some of the teachers above referred to, the evils thus shortly noticed appear no evils at all. These are they who come in when the school-hour is half over, and wonder to see their children scattered

among

the rest of the classes—who are indignant to find that their unnecessary absence and neglect, for a week or two, should be so much thought and blamed, and considered as a dereliction of duty. Let such consider well, and reflect upon the Master whose service they have entered, and the wages at which they were hired, and then say if they dare trifle with either. Would that we were able to say, “Brethren, we hope better things of you!”

Count well the cost before yon enter the work; but when you have begun, do it thoroughly. Eternal life and death are (humanly speaking) in your hands.

Treat them not as if you were in sport. “Wherefore, be diligent, that ye may be found of Him without spot and blameless.”—Scottish Sabbath School Teachers' Magazine.

THOUGHTS FOR CHILDREN.

No. I.
Oft we watch the show'r-drops fall
O'er the early meadow grass,
Till the flowers are fair and tall
Where the lab'rer bee must pass.
Oft by day, and oft by night,
Speeding down the shower is seen;
Every leaf made fresh and bright,
Where its shining gifts have been.
But there comes a mightier rain
Every Christian soul within,
Waiting long, but not in vain,
Mercy of the Lord to win.
God his gifts will surely pour,
Mercies like the silver showers,
Till the heart is gladden'd more
Than the earth's rejoicing flowers.

[ocr errors]

CARLTON TEACHERS' MEETING. The Annual Meeting of Teachers at Carlton was held, as usual, during the most convenient part of the harvest holidays. This

year

it was fixed for Tuesday the 15th of August. The number of Teachers amounted in all to 29, composed of 14 males and 15 females. Several clergymen were present on the occasion, two of whom gave addresses to the Teachers.

At seven o'clock in the morning it was proposed there should be a prayer meeting to implore the Divine blessing on the day. It was held at the house of the school. master of the village. Several of the Teachers engaged in prayer, after reading an appropriate portion of God's word ; this interesting prelude of the day lasted about half an hour, during the time of breakfast at the hall. At eight o'clock all met for family prayers at the hall, and again the blessing of heaven was besought upon the occasion.

The regular business of the day commenced at ten o'clock, and took place in the beautiful girls' school of the village. It commenced by singing and prayer. After a brief speech by the chairman, the worthy owner of the hall, in which he stated the objects of the meeting, viz., the glory of God-mutual edification and love-and the extension of the cause of Christian education—the Teachers were addressed on “Natural Theology.” This lasted about an hour, when the chairman and clergymen withdrew, leaving the Teachers to discuss such matters and subjects connected with teaching as the occasion called forth : this continued until the hour of dinner, at which all again repaired to the hall. This was half-past

one.

All again met at three; but the number of Teachers was increased by the addition of the Carlton Sundayschool Teachers. Singing and prayer again commenced the business; after which, the Teachers received ano. ther address. Prayer and singing ended the afternoon's proceedings. After this, the Teachers looked at many interesting works on education, brought to the school for that purpose, some of which had been published during the year-models of mechanical powers -of moveable galleries for schools-prints, illustrating the

processes of growing cotton and rice, &c. After viewing the interesting museum at the hall, and partaking of tea, many of the Teachers returned to their homes, whilst several remained for the night.

At the evening family prayers at the hall, an address was given by the Rev. G. G. Smith,* on the hope of the Chinese after death, illustrated by several paintings. Thus ended the day.

[The correspondent who has sent us this notice, has also sent us notes of two of the addresses delivered at the meeting, which we have not space to insert.]

OUR WEAKNESS. CatechIST.My good child, know this, that thou art not able to do these things of thyself, nor to walk in the commandments of God, and to serve him, without his special grace.

We have no strength to do these things of ourselves, and therefore it is necessary to seek the grace of God, if we would keep his commandments. The late Rev. Legh Richmond was once conversing with a person respecting a man who had acted inconsistently with his religious profession. After some angry severe remarks, the gentleman with whom he was discussing the case, concluded by saying, “I have no notion of such pretences, I will have nothing to do with him!” Nay, brother, let us be humble,” replied the other, “Remember who has said, 'making a difference.' With opportunity on the one hand, and Satan on the other, and the

grace

of God at neither, where should you and I be?”

When we have any particular temptation or trial to undergo, then we must be specially careful to seek strength from God; and he will not desert us. During the persecutions of Paganism, a female martyr fell into the pangs of childbirth the day before her execution, and

* Not the Rev. G. Smith, missionary to China.

cried out in her sufferings. The jailor asked her, if she cried out now, how would sbe endure a violent death on the morrow.

* To-day,” she replied, “I suffer what is ordinary, and have only ordinary assistance; to-morrow I am to suffer what is more than ordinary, and I shall have more than ordinary assistance,” And so it proved.

Which thou must learn at all times to call for by diligent prayer.

Endeavour to make yourselves acquainted with your weakness and necessities: and whatever you stand in need of, make it the subject of prayer to God.

A lady was once asked how she reconciled prayer to God for particular blessings, with absolute resignation to the Divine Will. “Very easily,” answered the lady: "just as if I were to offer a petition to a monarch, of whose kindness and wisdom I had the highest opinion. In such a case, my language would be, I wish you to bestow on me such or such a favor; but your majesty knows better than I, how far it would be agreeable to you, or right in itself

, to grant my desire. I therefore content myself with humbly presenting my petition, and leave the event of it entirely to you.

God will grant you what is necessary for “life and godliness,” and with respect to all other things “make your requests known unto God," but leave it in his hands to grant or deny.

Bishop Taylor remarks, “I have seen a lark rising from his bed of grass and soaring upwards, singing as he rises, and hopes to get to heaven, and climb above the clouds; but the poor bird was beaten back with the loud sighings of an eastern wind, and his motion made irregular and inconstant, descending more at every breath of the tempest, than it could recover by the libration and frequent weighing of his wings; till the little creature was forced to sit down and pant, and stay till the storm was over ; and then it made a prosperous flight, and did rise and sing, as if it had learned music and motion from an angel, as he passed sometimes through the air, about his ministries here below: so is the prayer of a good man." This is diligent prayer; and he who would hold communion with God, and enjoy his presence, must not suffer himself to be beaten back by wandering thoughts, or

« AnteriorContinuar »