The Masks of Hamlet

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University of Delaware Press, 1992 - 971 páginas
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Hamlet's challenge: "You would pluck out the heart of my mystery - "
Yes, we would. If we could. We can but try; and the best way to begin, this book suggests, is to share what distinguished actors, scholars, and critics have gleaned; and thus enriched by their experience forage in the text and come to know the play personally, intimately.
Again and again Mr. Rosenberg will insist that only the individual reader or actor can determine Shakespeare's design of Hamlet's character - and of the play. More, the reader, to interpret Hamlet's words and actions at the many crises, needs to double in the role of actor, imagining the character from the inside as well as observing it from the outside. So every reader is deputed by the author to be an actor-reader, invited to participate within Hamlet's mystery. The critical moments are examined, the options and ambiguities discussed, and the decisions left to individual judgment and intuition.
The mysteries of other major characters are similarly approached. What terrible sin haunts Gertrude, that she never confesses? What agonies hide behind Claudius' smile? Does Ophelia truly love Hamlet? Does she choose madness? What are Polonius' masked motives, as in using his daughter for bait for Hamlet? With how much effort must Laertes repress the conscience that finally torments him? Only the actor-reader can know.
And the mystery of the play itself: by what magic did Shakespeare interweave poetic language, character, and stage action to create a drama that for centuries has absorbed the attention and admiration of readers and theatre audiences on every continent in the world? The reader-actor will find out.
To prepare the actor-reader for insights, Mr. Rosenberg draws on major interpretations of the play worldwide, in theatre and in criticism, wherever possible from the first known performances to the present day. He discusses evidences of Hamlet's experience in Armenia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Czechoslovakia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Holland, Hungary, India, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Korea, Norway, Poland, Romania, Russia, South Africa, South America, Sweden, Turkey, the United Kingdom, the United States, and Yugoslavia.
Theatres from a number of these countries provided the author with videotapes of their Hamlet performances; his study of these, and of films and recordings, and of a number of modern stagings in America and abroad, deepened his sense of the play, as did interviews with actors and directors, and insights sent to him by colleagues and friends from throughout the world. Mr. Rosenberg followed one Hamlet production through rehearsals to performance, for personal experience of the staging of the play he discusses, as he did in his earlier books, The Masks of Othello, The Masks of King Lear, and The Masks of Macbeth . And as with the latter two studies, he came upon further illuminations of Shakespeare's art by exposing Hamlet to "naive" spectators who had never read or seen the play.

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Contenido

Act III Scene i Part 2
463
Act III Scene i Part 3
473
Act III Scene i Part 4
484
Act III Scene i Part 5
497
Act III Scene i Part 6
508
Act III Scene ii Part 1
548
Act III Scene ii Part 2
553
Act III Scene ii Part 3
560

Claudius
47
Gertrude
70
Act I Scene ii Part 2
82
Hamlet Part 1
92
Hamlet Part 2
118
Hamlet Part 3
155
Hamlet Part 4
167
Act I Scene ii Part 3
186
Act I Scene ii Part 4
204
Act I Scene ii Part 5
221
Ophelia
236
Laertes
253
Polonius
257
Act I Scene iii
265
Act I Scene iv
281
Act I Scene v Part 1
310
Act I Scene v Part 2
328
Act I Scene v Part 3
340
Act II Scene i
357
Act II Scene ii Part 1
368
Act II Scene ii Part 2
375
Act II Scene ii Part 3
386
Act II Scene ii Part 4
403
Act II Scene ii Part 5
415
Act II Scene ii Part 6
438
Act III Scene i Part 1
455
Act III Scene ii Part 4
572
Act III Scene ii Part 5
577
Act III Scene ii Part 6
594
Act III Scene iii
622
Act III Scene iv Part 1
641
Act III Scene iv Part 2
673
Act III Scene iv Part 3
686
Act IV Scene i
722
Act IV Scene ii
729
Act IV Scene iii
732
Act IV Scene iv
745
Act IV Scene v Part 1
757
Act IV Scene v Part 2
776
Act IV Scene v Part 3
789
Act IV Scene v Part 4
797
Act IV Scene vi
810
Act IV Scene vii
812
Act V Scene i Part 1
825
Act V Scene i Part 2
845
Act V Scene ii Part 1
859
Act V Scene ii Part 2
875
Act V Scene ii Part 3
905
Act V Scene ii Part 4
911
Bibliography
927
Index
955
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Página 178 - I am myself indifferent honest ; but yet I could accuse me of such things, that it were better my mother had not borne me ; I am very proud, revengeful, ambitious ; with more offences at my beck, than I have thoughts to put them in, imagination to give them shape, or time to act them in.
Página 309 - What if it tempt you toward the flood, my lord, Or to the dreadful summit of the cliff That beetles o'er his base into the sea, And there assume some other horrible form, Which might deprive your sovereignty of reason And draw you into madness...
Página 33 - And then it started, like a guilty thing Upon a fearful summons. I have heard The cock, that is the trumpet to the morn, Doth with his lofty and shrill-sounding throat Awake the god of day; and at his warning. Whether in sea or fire, in earth or air, The extravagant and erring spirit hies To his confine; and of the truth herein This present object made probation.
Página 79 - Such an act, That blurs the grace and blush of modesty; Calls virtue, hypocrite; takes off the rose From the fair forehead of an innocent love, And sets a blister there; makes marriage vows As false as dicers...
Página 473 - To assume a pleasing shape; yea, and perhaps Out of my weakness and my melancholy, As he is very potent with such spirits, Abuses me to damn me. I'll have grounds More relative than this: the play's the thing Wherein I'll catch the conscience of the king.
Página 12 - Whose blood and judgment are so well commingled That they are not a pipe for fortune's finger To sound what stop she please. Give me that man That is not passion's slave, and I will wear him In my heart's core, ay, in my heart of heart, As I do thee.
Página 168 - O, what a noble mind is here o'erthrown! The courtier's, soldier's, scholar's, eye, tongue, sword; The expectancy and rose of the fair state, The glass of fashion and the mould of form, The observed of all observers, quite, quite down!
Página 284 - That for some vicious mole of nature in them, As, in their birth, wherein they are not guilty, Since nature cannot choose his origin, By the o'ergrowth of some complexion, Oft breaking down the pales and forts of reason, Or by some habit that too much o'er-leavens The form of plausive manners ; that these men, Carrying, I say, the stamp of one defect, Being nature's livery, or fortune's star, Their virtues else, be they as pure as grace, As infinite as man may undergo, Shall in the general censure...

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