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LESSON XXXIV.

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THE GIRL WHO WAS DISPLEASED WITH HER OWN CONDUCT.

A little girl came into a room, where she saw a looking-glass for the first time. As she approached it, she smiled to see a little girl coming towards her.

She stood some time before the glass, wondering at the sight; and then began to make faces at the image; but as soon as she did so, the child in the glass returned the same looks.

This greatly displeased her; and she at length became so angry at seeing her own actions, that she would have struck at the glass, if she could have reached it.

But she was still more provoked,

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by seeing the child in the glass as angry as herself, and as ready to strike and abuse her.

Just then, her mother entered the room. When she had made her daughter quiet, she said to her, “Did not the girl in the glass smile when you smiled, as well as frown when you frowned ?"

“Yes," replied the child.

Then said the mother, “Did you not begin to be angry before the child in the glass showed any signs of anger??'

At these questions, the child confessed, that the one in the glass had only done after her wirt she had first done herself.

Her mother then showed her that she had been vexed and angry at the sight of her own actions; “and let this teach you," said she, “the effect of your conduct upon others.

"Be kind and pleasant to them, and they will be kind to you; but if you are unkind and ugly, you will soon make your companions like yourself.

“ Try, hereafter, so to act at all times, that, if the glass were before you, it would always reflect the countenance of gentleness and good humor."

LESSON XXXV.

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THE IMPATIENT BOY.

0, mother, give each of us a flower bed that we may call our own, Gustavus one, and Melvina one, and me one, and we will take care of them!

Thus spake little Orlando to his mother, and the mother granted his wish, and gave to each of her children a flower bed, full of beautiful pinks.

And the children were delighted with the gift, and said, when the pinks begin to bloom, it will be a lovely sight; for it was not yet the season of flowers, the buds had just appeared.

But little Orlando was very impatient, and could not wait until the buds had opened, and he wished that his flower bed should bloom before either of the others.

He went into the garden and took a bud in his hand, and was greatly rejoiced when he saw that a bright, red leaf was already beginning to peep out of the green covering.

But as I just told you, Orlando could not wait for it to blossom. He broke open the bud, and pulled apart the leaves. Now, cried he with a loud voice, see, my pink has blown!

But when the sun shone upon it, the flower bowed its head, drooped npon its stalk, and withered before

it was noon. And the boy wept over it.

But the mother said, impatient child! you have purchased your knowledge too dearly; and may this be the last joy of your life, which you shall destroy by your own impatience and folly!

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Jacob and Esau were the sons of Isaac; but though they were brothers, they did not love each other. Esau hated Jacob, and thought to kill him, as Cain did Abel.

To keep out of his way, Jacob

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