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EXAMINATION

OF THE
1, THIRD VOL U ME

0 773 CL
Mr. DANIEL NE A L's
HISTORY of the PURITANS.

. IN WHICH
The Reflections of that Author, upon the Blessed Martyr

King CHARLES the First, are proved to be groundless :
His Misrepresentation of the Conduct of the Prelates of
those Times fully detected, and his numerous Mistakes in
History, and unfair way of quoting, exposed to publick Views

By Z A C H AR Y GR E X, LL.D. Rector

of Houghton-Conqueft, in Bedfordshirè.

With a large Appendix of Letters and Papers, copied from the

original Manuscripts of the late Rev. JOHN NALSON, LLD.
now in the Custody of the Rev. PHILIP WILLIAMS.
D. D. President of St. John's College in Cambridge:

Historia vero teftis temporum, lux veritatis, vita memoriæ, magiftra vitæ, nuntia
vetuftatis,

Cic. de Oratpre. Lib. 2. Sect. 20. p. 158. Edit. Ro. Stephan.
Qui ut crimina in silentium mitterent fua, vitam infamare conati funt alienam.

Et cum poffent ipsi ab innocentibus argui ; innocentes arguere ftuduerunt, mito
tentes ubique litteras livore dictante conscriptas.

Optat. Adverf. Parmenian, Donatif. Lib. I. p. 22. Edit. Gabr.

Albafpinæi. Parifijs, 1679.

LONDON:

Printed by J. BettenHAM •
And Sold by A. BÉTTESWORTH and C. HITCH, at the Red-Ling

in Pater-nofter Rott,' MDCCXXXVII.

Impartial Examination

OF THE
Third Volume of Mr. DANIEL
NEAL's History of the Puritáns.

Redona 5.27 -- 3. TT.T

Was, in hopes (as I observed in my Examination

of his second Volume) that when Mr. Neal had J carefully perused the excellent Answer to his first

Volume of the History of the Puritans, by the prefent Right Reva. Lord Bishop of St. Asaph, That Impartiality, of which he makes such frequent Professions, would either have prevented him from pursuing his Design, or at least induced him to have examined his Authorities with more Care and Candour, ihan I can find he has hitherto done ; or to have retracted many of his egregious Mistakes, scarce consistent with the Exactness of an Historian. But instead of this, he has replied to the Bihop's Examination, and has indeed corrected some sew trilling Mistakes, which were obvious enough to almost every common Reader, yed at the same time has persisted in the Defence of some of the most material ones, which every one, who is conversant with the History of those Times, upon the slightest Observation will be able to discover.

Nay, he is so far from being discouraged, that he has pursued his Work through the latter part of King Charles's Reign, and has spun out the laft six or seven Years of it, to the uncommon Size of above six hundred Pages, and how well he has succeeded in this his last Attempt, I come now to examine.

He complains indeed in his Preface (P. I.) of the Difficulty of discovering the Motives of Action on citber fide, and yet he seems to think himself capable of accounting for them in a variety of Places in this Book: A 2

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