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THE

RENFREW SHIRE

M A G A Z I N E.

1846—7.

PAISLEY: ROBERT STEWART.

1847.

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385

PROSE ARTICLES.

Page
A Cruise in the Firth of Clyde,

363
Alexander's “Switzerland and 'Swiss Churches,”

231
A Tale for the Times,

394

“ Auld Robin Gray” in Paris

. (A Letter to the Editor;)

20

A Glance at the Weeklies,

474
Antiquities of the Burgh of Paisley,

476

Carsly Hall,

168

Connection of Greek Tragedy with Religious and Civil Events,

355
Dr. Nicholl's “System of the World,”

85

Dramatic Representations and Novel-Reading. "By Andrew Park,

182

Honesty the Best Policy,

76

Hood's Poems,

186

Humanity versus Industry,

234

History of the Town and Castle of Dumbarton,

439
Introductory Address,

1
Illustrations of Social Evils—“Call Again,”

5
-“I've Forgot,”

90

“I'll See about it To-morrow,”

251

James Smith of Deanston. By J. R. G.

469

Lady Bores,

238

Letter on English Hexameters,

259

My Old Arm-Chair. A Sexagenarian's Reverie,

64
Malina Neale. A Tale. By “A Constant Reader,”

216
Maritime Discovery,

241, 289
Nights at the Peesweep,

71, 106
Our Sacred Poets.-Blair’s “Grave," and Pollok’s “Course of Time," 321, 405
Our Modern Authors.-George Gilfillan,
Phemie's Walk: An Epoch in the Dearth of -99,

12
Poets and Pensions.-Knowles and Tennyson,

47
Passages in the Life of Oliver Nappe,

63, 96, 126
Perseverance Rewarded; or, The Glasgow Merchant. By G. J. R.

432
Pope's Essay on Man,

437
Recent Popular Works of Fiction,

213
Scotland: its Poverty and Crime,

81
Scottish Poets.-Fergusson and Burns,

121
Straggling Thoughts at Odd Moments.—The Eccentricities of Genius,
Shakspeare's “Hamlet,”
Scottish Philosophy,
The Aristocracy of Literature, and Literary Criticism,
“ The Battle of Life,” by Charles Dickens,
The Buchanites,
The Character and Genius of Robert Tannahill

,

161

The Death of Odus. An Ossianic Tale,

The Desire of Happiness the Incentive to Human Action,

268

The Eagle's Revenge. A Tale of the Tribe of the Las-Mag-Mi,

274

The Fortunes of Martin Hay. By Lewis Titian, 304, 325, 371, 411, 448

The Life and Writings of Alexander Wilson,

281, 441

The Memorial Stones of Renfrewshire, .

141, 193

The Peesweep,

The People: their Condition and Prospects,

41
The Poems of the Late William Motherwell,

201
The Province of Intellect—The Advancement of Truth,

150

The Rev. Mr. Guthrie's Plea for Ragged Schools,

The Scott Monument, and its Inauguration,

31

The Triumph of Mrs. Murphy O’Leery. A Tale of Rowland's Kalydor, 343

Thoughts on Social Progress,

357

The Aldburghs. By the late J- H-, Esq.,

The Drama-its Uses and Abuses,

Valedictory Address,

Wanderings of a Naturalist in Renfrewshire.-Botany,

271, 299

"Wit and Humour,” by Leigh Hunt,

155

POETRY.

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THE

RENFREWSHIRE MAGAZINE.

SEPTEMBER, 1846.

INTRODUCTORY ADDRESS.

On the advent of a new periodical for Renfrewshire and Renfrewshire people, it will be expected that, according to established custom, something shonld be said by way of introduction.

In our prospectus, we believe, we have fully stated our motives and our aim; and although we have refrained from giving large promises, or expecting great returns, nevertheless, we are determined to use our utmost endeavours to serve the public and ourselves; for, be assured, we shall not forget the French proverb, “ Aide toi, et Dieu t'aidera.”

It may be asked by what right we thrust ourselves before the public at this moment ? To which we answer, We come before the world in virtue of the progressive spirit of the age, and of that right which every man possesses to do what he believes to be for the general good. We think we perceive signs and shadows of coming realities, which it behoves every human being to assist in bringing forward, by all the energies of his mind and all the extent of his influence. We live in a new era of the world's existence—a new cycle of its history has evidently begun. Old habits, old customs, old institutions, are being broken up, and supplanted by a new order of things. A generation of men that have passed, or are passing away, have found themselves bewildered with the unprecedented nature of the present movement. Their fathers were of the old world—they, the links between the inertness of the past and the vivified existence of the present. Loud and earnest have been their warnings against the impatient progress of the modern world—honest their prognostications of its ruinous results-but the business of the world moves forward still through all its inextricable mazes; it goes on its way rejoicing, and, if not prospering so largely as many of its restless spirits wish, still it goes on in hope, with brilliant visions and foretastes of the coming future. Our fathers, in the con

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