Female Mourning in Medieval and Renaissance English Drama: From the Raising of Lazarus to King Lear

Portada
Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., 2006 - 254 páginas
The author looks at how the spectral resurrections of classical Marian pity in the plays of Francis Beaumont, John Fletcher, Thomas Kyd, William Shakespeare and John Webster help to work out the cultural trauma of the Reformation.

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I have scanned through various pieces of this book and am very impressed with the contents. The reader should take care that mourning as discussed in this text is not necessarily Freudian in nature. Although Freud is briefly mention, Freud refers to mourning as a process of letting a loved object go. Goodland's approach is much more comprehensive and includes aspects of fear and vengence as well as separation. Although not my particular forté, I would recommend this book to anyone interested in studying literary aspects of mourning. 

Contenido

Female Mourning and Tragedy in Medieval English Drama
31
Resistant Female Grief in the Lazarus Plays
37
Maternal Mourning and Tragedy in the Nativity and Passion Plays
55
Residual Lament in the Resurrection Plays
77
Deranging Female Lament in Renaissance Tragedy
101
Constance and the Claims of Passion
119
Mourning and Communal Memory in Shakespeares Richard III
135
Monstrous Mourning Women in Kyd Shakespeare and Webster
155
The Gendered Poetics of Tragedy in Shakespeares Hamlet
171
Inverting the Pietà in Shakespeares King Lear
201
Bibliography
221
Index
241
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Página 223 - The Book of the Common Prayer and Administration of the Sacraments, and other Rites and Ceremonies of the Church, after the use of the Church of England.

Acerca del autor (2006)

Katharine Goodland is Assistant Professor of English at the City University of New York's College of Staten Island, USA.

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