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BROTHERs:—After the full explanation, in my introductory address to you in the preceding work, entitled “Faith, Hope, and Charity,” of the objects I have in view in the publication of this series of volumes, it is not necessary that I should say much on presenting another candidate for your favor. As a contribution to the literature of our Order, it is believed that, to say the least, it will be found every way worthy of the liberal patronage you have been pleased to extend to its predecessors I think, moreover, that you will discover in it a verification of the remarks I hazarded in the address above alluded to, respecting the advancement of our literature. That the present volume affords abundant evidence of such progress, I will not anticipate your judgment by affirming.

The present volume is the last of this series: its immediate successors are the beautiful volumes entitled “The Odd-Fellows’ Offering for 1848,” and that for 1849.

In the hope that these volumes will have their proper effect, in elevating the intellectual and moral character of the members of our Order, and of all others who may chance to read them,

I remain, brothers,
Yours in F. L. and T.,

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A FRIEND IN NEED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ‘. . . . . . Page 69 THE LAST Visit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 THE PIONEER's PERILs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227 THE WIDow’s FRIEND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • - - - - - - - - - 253

FRIENDSHIP, LOWE, AND TRUTH,

LOVE's TRIUMPH OVER PREJUDICE,

Night, serene and beautiful, enveloped the picturesque village of M swering rays as they peered through the dark casements,

The prying moonbeams met no an

save here and there, where the partly-shaded room revealed the flickering taper beside some sick couch, or the open window disclosed the patient sempstress bending over her long task with feverish cheek and hectic cough. The furious plunge of a broad stream over the rocks of a fathomless ravine, alone broke the calm hush brooding above hill and valley, forest and plain. Beside the torrent, beneath the arms of an old oak, and in a natural arm-chair formed by its twisted roots, sat two young people in deep converse; while the flitting shadows of the

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