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The Introduction will, it is believed, be found of practical value to the teacher. It contains a great variety of words and sentences for training the voice and forming a distinct articulation. Such directions as are deemed necessary appear as explanatory of these selections, rather than as arbitrary rules on a subject which, from its nature, is hardly capable of being reduced to rule.

In the preparation of the Spelling and Defining Lessons, and of the Introductory matter, the compiler has received valuable aid from the practical experience of L. J. Campbell, A. M., and Geo. N. Jackson, A. M.

The compiler has only to add, that the lessons have been carefully selected and prepared, and that he has been aided by the judgment and taste of teachers, who have had the original Fourth Class Reader in use since its first appearance. The favor with which that work has been received he hopes may be extended to this.

G. S. HILLARD.

Boston, May, 1863.

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LESSON.

PAGE.

6. THE LORD'S PRAYER,

Robert Blair. 44

7. THE THEFT OF THE GOLDEN EAGLE,

45

8. THE IDLE GIRL,

Youth's Companion. 48

9. THE BUNDLE OF MATCHES,

Hans Andersen. 49

10. OLD SANTA CLAUS,

Abby Allin. 53

11. THE DAISY AND THE LARK,

Hans Andersen. 55

12. MORNING,

60

13. UNCLE BEN's STORY,

Oliver Optic. 61

14. UNCLE BEN'S STORY, CONCLUDED,

65

15. THE CHILD AND THE BROOK,

Abby Allin. 68

16. THE DISCONTENTED RIVULET,

. Mrs. Follen. 70

17. The Evil ADVISER,

Goodrich. 74

18. THE NEW YEAR,

Alfred Tennyson. 80

19. HELEN HERBERT'S LESSON,

Youth's Companion. 81

20. BY AND BY,

N. Y. Observer. 84

21. INSTINCT,

Thomas Day. 86

22. INSTINCT, CONCLUDED,

90

23. THE BROWN THRUSH,

Lucy Larcom. 93

24. SPRING RAIN,

Ohio Farmer. 94

25. THE RAT WITH A BELL,

Evenings at Home. 96

26. THE FOUR SEASONS,

98

27. PERSEVERANCE,

Eliza Cook. 101

28. WASTING TIME,

103

29. THE HOURS OF CHILDHOOD,

Mrs. Gordon. 108

30. THE CITY GIRL IN THE COUNTRY,

Mrs. Chilà. 109

31. THE COUNTRY GIRL IN THE CITY, .

114

32. THE DEAR OLD FLAG,

Boston Transcript, 119

.33. PRAISE OF GOD: A HYMN IN PROSE, Mrs. Barbauld. 121

34. Night: A HYMN IN PROSE,

Mrs. Barbauld. 122

35. OUR NATIVE LAND,

125

36. THE DEAD WARRIOR,

Park Benjamin. 126

37. THE INDIAN CHIEF,

Murray's Introduction. 127

38. The Snow,

Mrs. Follen. 130

39. THE ROBIN REDBREAST,

132

40. The Do-NOTHINGS,

134

41. THE BATTLE OF BLENHEIM,

Southey. 138

42. BREAKFAST TABLE SCIENCE,

141

43. BREAKFAST TABLE SCIENCE, CONTINUED,

146

44. BREAKFAST TABLE SCIENCE, CONCLUDED,

151

45. BALLAD OF THE TEMPEST,

Fields. 158

46. INDIANS AND WHITES IN NEW ENGLAND,

159

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MARKS OR POINTS USED IN PRINTING.

The following points or marks are those most frequently used in written composition, and serve to show more clearly the writer's meaning, and the pauses and inflections required in reading.

The Comma (,) usually denotes the shortest stop in reading.
The Semicolon (; ) requires a pause somewhat longer than a comma.
The Colon ( : ) requires a pause somewhat longer than a semicolon.

The Period ( . ) indicates the end of a sentence, and requires a full stop. It is also used after all abbreviations; as, Mr. for Mister, Eng. for England.

The Note of Interrogation (?) indicates that a question is asked ; as, What is the matter?

The Note of Exclamation (!) is used after expressions of strong emotion, earnest addresses, &c.; as, Liberty! Freedom! Tyranny is dead !

The Marks of Parenthesis ( ) are used to enclose a word, phrase, or remark, which is explanatory, and which might be omitted without injury to the sense; as, Time (so it is said) is money.

The Dash (-) is used to denote an unfinished sentence, a sudden turn, an abrupt transition, or that a significant pause is required; as, “ The pages of history - how is it that they are so dark and sad?”

REMARK. – The dash may be used after other points, to increase the length of a pause,

and also instead of the marks of parenthesis. The Apostrophe (') denotes the omission of one or more letters ; as, ne'er, for never, tho', for though. It is also the sign of the possessive case of nouns ; as, The boy's pen, The boys' pens.

The Hyphen (-) is used to separate syllables, and also the parts of a compound word; as, cit-i-zen, town-house. It is also used at the end of a line, when part of a word is carried to the beginning of the next line.

Quotation Marks (" ") are used to show that the exact words of another are given ; as, There is much truth in the proverb, “ Light gains make heavy purses.” A quotation within a quotation is marked by single points ; as, He exclaimed, “ The wide, wide sea' is before us."

Brackets, or Crotchets, [ ], are chiefly used in citations to enclose an explanation, or correction, inserted by some other person than the author; as, “ She (Nature] gave him (man) alone the power of laughing."

The Index, or Hand (H), is used to show that special attention is directed to a particular passage. Sometimes three stars, arranged thus (***), are used instead of the Index.

The Brace ( -) is used to connect two or more words or lines with something to which they are related ; as, James

Stuart.

Charles Marks of Ellipsis (***) indicate the omission of letters, or words; as, K**g G****e, for King George. Sometimes a long dash, or a succession of dots, is used instead of the stars ; as, I-dMy, for Lord Murray.

The Diæresis ( . ) is placed over the second of two vowels, to show that they must be sounded separately ; as, aërial.

The Asterisk, or Star ( * ), the Dagger, or Obelisk (†), the Double Dagger ( 1 ), the Section ($), Parallels ( I ), and the Paragraph ( ), are marks, used in the order here given, referring to the margin or the bottom of a page. Small Italic letters or the Arabic figures are sometimes employed for the same purpose,

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