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her own manner of loving, in whatever relation, and refused to believe the existence of sincere sentiments, that did not express themselves like hers;" and that she 6 revolted against the obstacles which the frame of society, and often human indolence, oppose to the enjoyments of the heart.” It is obvious, that with such a temperament, and such ideas, the severest disappointments and mortifications were inevitable.

Madame de Saussure elsewhere informs us that her friend“ profoundly lamented the lot of women, and more particularly pitied those who were endued with eminent faculties, when denied the happiness of wedded love, in her eyes of all the greatest.” It appeared to her, in this case, “equally difficult for them to confine themselves within the narrow limits of their fate, or to overstep those limits without exposing themselves to pungent sorrows." Her own sad experience was the teacher of this solid wisdom.-In secretly espousing, at last, a young officer—M. Rocca, claiming compassion for his wounds and debility—she attempted to fill up the aching void of her soul. Because she believed that she had inspired, or because she fondly hoped to raise, the kind and degree of love and tenderness of which she deemed herself still capable, she incurred the afflictive duty of watching and assuaging the ebb of a life which was to become as precious as her own. Ambition we have specified as one of the causes of her comparative infelicity. She was not content to shine and rule in the republic of letters alone ;-she sighed and struggled for power and distinction in every exalted sphere ; she would have conquered Napoleon, legislated for France, prescribed for Russia and Britain ; in short, she meddled emulously and anxiously with all sorts of public affairs. The world may be indebted to this extravasation of female thoughts and desires for much of the

pith of her Considerations on the French Revolution, but it helped to mar her own welfare.

The support of Christian piety was wanting to Madame de Stael, as well as the anchor of connubial love. Her friend mentions, indeed, that from the epoch of her father's death, her religious opinions became more decided; "the vague of a poetic belief ceased to satisfy her cravings; she required a firm faith in that promise of immortality which alone saved her from despair ; she had need of being a Christian, because her father died a Christian ; in her mortal struggle, she repelled the terrors of death, by the thought that she was going to rejoin her father.” This was, truly, a close contraction of the Christian faith and hope; too close for a person of her liabilities and moral constitution.

It is not to her genius, or to fortune, that we must impute the miscarriage of her endeavours after happiness. Her example is full of admonition against immoderate and incongruous avidities and efforts. Talents form a productive blessing for a female, if they are cultivated and applied conformably to her plain natural destination: simple domestic life is a safe, and not a very narrow sphere, of duty and pleasure. When the actual condition of the two sexes in civilized society is sedately and broadly examined, the lot of each is seen to have its inconveniences and its advantages; and, perhaps, superiority cannot be asserted for either on the whole.

With regard to relative mental powers, wild speculation and superfluous ingenuity have been lavished on both sides of the question. In endowing each, Providence has distinguished the share and quality, and separated the uses, in his general economy. We would refer to Hannah More's “ Comparative View of the Sexes," for a rational and discriminative discussion of this topic. In

adducing cases of female scholarship, we have shown that females are at least capable of becoming learned in the ultimate degree, but we have not meant to recommend a classical education to our country women. The German professor, Meiners, well observes, that in the sixteenth, and first half of the seventeenth centuries, the modern languages were unpolished, and had produced very few masterpieces ; and therefore, the women of genius, who were desirous of cultivating their understandings and their hearts, were obliged to learn the ancient languages, in whose works alone they could find the treasures of useful and ornamental knowledge. This necessity has disappeared; the literature of each of the modern tongues, is sufficiently refined and comprehensive. Our state of society, and the offices of an American wife and mother, are, moreover, such, that the time requisite for the proper acquisition of the Greek and Latin, cannot be afforded, and the application, or general usefulness of this knowledge, would be much more limited than it is in Europe.

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adducing cases of female scholarship, we have shown that females are at least capable of becoming learned in the ultimate degree, but we have not meant to recommend a classical education to our country women. The German professor, Meiners, well observes, that in the sixteenth, and first half of the seventeenth centuries, the modern languages were unpolished, and had produced very few masterpieces; and therefore, the women of genius, who were desirous of cultivating their understandings and their hearts, were obliged to learn the ancient languages, in whose works alone they could find the treasures of useful and ornamental knowledge. This necessity has disappeared; the literature of each of the modern tongues, is sufficiently refined and comprehensive. Our state of society, and the offices of an American wife and mother, are, moreover, such, that the time requisite for the proper acquisition of the Greek and Latin, cannot be afforded, and the application, or general usefulness of this knowledge, would be much more limited than it is in Europe.

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