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or where probabilities seem evenly balanced; very rarely indeed have I offered an independent suggestion, the chief instance being the reading of “fury-kindled” for “fierykindled” in II. i. 358. In one or two instances mentioned and noted passim, I have altered the punctuation.

Finally, I gratefully acknowledge valuable help from Professor Littledale and from the general editor of this series.

THE LIFE AND DEATH OF KING JOHN DRAMATIS PERSONÆ*

KING JOHN.
PRINCE HENRY, son to the king.
ARTHUR, Duke of Bretagne, nephew to the king.
THE EARL OF PEMBROKE.
THE EARL OF Essex.
THE EARL OF SALISBURY.
THE LORD BIGOT.
HUBERT DE BURGH.
ROBERT FAULCONBRIDGE, son to Sir Robert Faulconbridge.
Philip the Bastard, his half-brother.
JAMES GURNEY, servant to Lady Faulconbridge.
PETER of Pomfret, a prophet.
Philip, king of France.
LEWIS, the Dauphin.
LYMOGES, Duke of Austria.
CARDINAL PANDULPH, the Pope's legate.
MELUN, a French lord.
CHATILLON, ambassador from France to King John.
QUEEN ELINOR, mother to King John.
CONSTANCE, mother to Arthur.
BLANCH of Spain, niece to King John.
LADY FAULCONBRIDGE.
Lords, Citizens of Angiers, Sheriff, Heralds, Officers,

Soldiers, Messengers, and other Attendants. Scene: Partly in England, and partly in France. * The list of dramatis persona does not appear in the Folios. It was first given by Rowe.

THE LIFE AND DEATH OF

KING JOHN

ACT I

SCENE I.-King John's Palace. Enter KING JOHN, QUEEN ELINOR, PEMBROKE, ESSEX,

SALISBURY, and others, with CHATILLON. K. John. Now, say, Chatillon, what would France with us ? Chat. Thus, after greeting, speaks the King of France

In my behaviour to the majesty,

The borrowed majesty, of England here. Eli. A strange beginning : "borrowed majesty!” 5 K. John. Silence, good mother; hear the embassy. Chat. Philip of France, in right and true behalf

Of thy deceased brother Geffrey's son,

Arthur Plantagenet, lays most lawful claim with Chatillon] The Folios read their behaviours from the great," and “ with the Chattylion of France." Faulconbridge's embassy to the Perhaps “Lord” had dropped out French, v. ii. 128, 129: “ Now hear before Chattylion," or perhaps our English king; For thus his Chatyllionwas taken to mean royalty doth speak in me." “ Chatelain” or some similar title. 9. Arthur ... claim] Pope need

3. In my behaviour] through my lessly omits most. Scan Arthur conduct as ambassador. Compare v. Plantag'net, lays most lawful claim." i. 50, 51: “inferior eyes, That borrow Compare 3 Henry VI. 1. i. 40: “Un. “The trespass that my father made 10. the territories] There is no

10

To this fair island and the territories,
To Ireland, Poictiers, Anjou, Touraine, Maine,
Desiring thee to lay aside the sword
Which sways usurpingly these several titles,
And put the same into young Arthur's hand,
Thy nephew and right royal sovereign.

15
K. John. What follows if we disallow of this ?
Chat. The proud control of fierce and bloody war,

To enforce these rights so forcibly withheld.
K. John. Here have we war for war and blood for blood,

Controlment for controlment : so answer France. 20
Chat. Then take my king's defiance from my mouth,

The farthest limit of my embassy.
K. John. Bear mine to him, and so depart in peace:

Be thou as lightning in the eyes of France;
For ere thou canst report I will be there, 25

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18. enforce] inforce F 1. less Plantag'net, Duke of York, be 17. The proud ... war] the proud king” ; and ibid. line 48: “ I'll plant constraint of fierce and bloody war. Plantag'net, root him up who dares.” There is no similar use of the word In many other cases, however, Shake. “control” in Shakespeare. In speare gives four syllables to Plan- Troublesome Raigne, 1. ii. 11, however, tagenet.

we find : “ Till I had with an unre. 10. island] One is here tempted to sisted shock Controld the mannage keep the older and more correct form of proud Angiers walls"; and in ilandas printed in F1. Compare Kyd's Spanish Tragedy, 1. ii. 138, Milton's Comus, line 50: “On Circe's 139:iland fell.”

in peace other case of the use of “the terri- Is now controll'd by fortune of tories" in this way by Shakespeare. the wars." One is tempted to suggest either. 20. controlment: so] Shakespeare " and the territories Of Ireland," or often uses, as here, an extra syllable her territories.” In Troublesome before the cæsura. There is no need Raigne, 11. iii. (ed. 1591), we have to alter the second “controlment" to “to England, Cornwall and Wales, “control.” and to their territories."

21. Then take ... mouth] Com12. Desiring] commanding. Com- pare Henry V. III. V. 37: “Let him pare modern English (to a child): “I greet England with our sharp dedesire you to come here."

fiance."

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