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PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETOR, 2 PARK-PLACE.

1841.

P2571

NEW-YORK:

PRINTED

BY WILLIAM OSBORX, 88 William-street.

A.

G.
An Evening Reverie. By W. C. God's Hand in America. By Rev.
BRYANT, Esq.,
68 Geo. B. CHEEVER,

254 Arcturus Magazine,

85 | Gossip with Readers and CorresA Song of the Sea. By H. W. Rock

pondents, 69, 176, 264, 348, 532 WELL, Esq.,

98 Going to Sea and going to See, 306 Anacreontic. From Frithiof's Saga, 122

H.
An Essay on the Voice. By JOHN Harry Cott: A Sketch of Long.
WATERS,

195
Island,

153 Alcæus Redivivus, Anacreontic; HARPER's School District Library, 175 from the Spanish,

257 Hints to Authors: The Style DraArnold at the tomb of Andre, 259 matic,

345 An Incident of 1777, 259 Heartward,

413 American Turf Register and Sport

I. ing Magazine,

262 IRVING INSTITUTE, Tarrytown, (N. Y.,) 261 A Criticism on the Eneid, etc. By Invocation to Nature,

275 BONAPARTE,

271

L.
A Forest Fête. By the Author of Love's Labor Lost: A Sketch of
'A New Home,'

276
Key-West,

48 An Essay on Spirituality. By JOHN LITERARÝ Notices, 72, 160, 254, 339, 428, WATERS, 282

522 A New System of Temperaments, 301 Life and Writings of JOHNSON : BurA Story of La Morgue. By J. M. Field,

lesque of BoswELL,

86 321 Legend of the Susquehannah, 159 A Peep at my Neighbors, 323 Lines to a certain Poet,

191 Anthem of Nature,

329 Les Eaux Bonnes. By an American April. By Isaac M'LELLAN, jr., 334

Lady,

212 Aristocracy in America,

343 Lessons of the Forest, By CLARENCE An Old Maid's Soliloquy,

351
HERBERT,

227 Afternoon Lecture. By Rev. DEMO

Lines to a Flower from Mars' Hill,
CRITUS HUMDRUM,

369
An Old Bachelor's
Port-Folio,
Athens,

232 376 Lines to the Blue Bird,

363 A Glimpse of the Olden Time, 379 Lines to Spring,

388 An Hour in the Louvre, 386 Lines to the Wind. By ‘Pictor,'

399 An Incident on Lake George,

400 Austin's Voice to the Married,' 429, 527 Lines written in Trinity Church

Lost Joys,

402 Anthon's Classical Dictionary, 431

Yard,

427 B.

LEMPRIERE's Dictionary and NewBroëk, The Dutch Paradise. By

York Review,

432 GEOFFREY CRAYON, 55 LINDLEY's Horticulture,

437 Balzac's Review of Cooper's 'Patha

Letters by 'Fr. FLANEUR,'

492 finder,

72 Lament of the Forest. By THOMAS Bulwer's Night and Morning, 256

COLE,

516 C, Christian Review: BUNYAN'S Pil.

Memoirs, Letters, etc. of JAMES
grim's Progress,

81
SMITH,

77 Caleffi : The Ferrarese Carbonaro, 125 Mother Carey's Chickens. By Grace CRAWFORD: The Sculptor,

174
Grafton,

138 Confossions of a Quack,

179 Murder's 'Miraculous Organ,' 169 Cuba in 1941,

415

Mary Hart: an Incident of the Corse De Leon. By G. P. R. JAMES, 430

Creck War,

206 D.

Mester and Animal Magnetism, 217, 447 Dr. BeThose's Address, 87 Memory: a Fragment,

242 Davis on Wine and the Grape, 90 M series of Human Life, Dell of the Trenton Falls, 211 Modern Transcendentalism,

469 Don Juan: A Spectral Research. By Mohawk River. By H. W. RockGEOFFREY CRAYON,

247 Dow's Patent Sermons,

WELL, Esq.,

498 445

N. Dumas' Democracy,'

522 New-York Asylum for the Blind : Death's Teachings, 530 The Blind Girl,

80 Death of An Angel,

495 Notes of a Non-Combatant in the
E
Mediterranean,

91 Editor's Table, 78, 166, 257, 343, 432, 527 New-York. By G. D. STRONG, Esq., 123 Elegiac Stanzas. By Miss E. H.

Night Study. By Rev. GEORGE W.
WHITTIER,

221
BETHUNE, Philadelphia,

141 F.

Napoleon. By S. D. DAKIN, Esq., 153 Foreign Correspondence, 170 Nature: A Winter Sketch,

205 Farewell to New-England, 200 New Song. By Flaccus,

305

M

267

139

Neamathla : The Head Chief of the The Cradle and the Coffin. By J.
Creeks,
335 MCLELLAN, Jr., Esq.,

151
Novelties and Quackeries,

359 The Hour and the Man. By Miss
ells
0.
MARTINEAU,

160
B
44 The North-American Review,

163
a
.

47 | The Muckle House: a Revolution-
Oratory. By CHARLES H. Lyon, Esq.,

ary Reminiscence,

166
P.
The 'Dial' for January,

171
Peter Cram at Tinnecum,

32 The Funeral-Tree of the Sokokis.
Pedrillo, the Private Tutor,
119 By J. G. WHITTIER,

192
Physiognomy, or a True Key to the The Sons of France. From BERAN-
Paragon of Animals',

142
GER,

197
Passing Lessons,

326 The Old Bachelor: A Valentine, 201
Poetical Epistle io the Editor, 328 The Lone Widow, a Lament,

222
Poetical Literature of the West, 340 | The Ocean Tide to the Rivulet. By
Powhattan : A Metrical Romance.

lone,

223
By Seba Smith,

350 The Latin a Living Language, 225
Poetry and Lite of Scott: FRANCIS' Tribute to the Departed. By J. K.
Edition,
442 ARMSTRONG, Esq.,

228
Passing Away! By Geo. H. COLTON, 494 The Eccentric. By a Lady,

228
Q.

The Great Self-Regulating Steam-
Quiet Thoughts on Pastoral Life.

Balloon,

233
By John WATERS,

18 The Warning. By R. M. CHARLTON, 252
Quod Correspondence,

476 | The Emperor Alexander and his
R.
Hackman,

260
Rome in the Carnival. By an Ame-

The Apollo Association,

266, 433
rican in Europe,

314 The April Shower. By Mrs. SEBA
Retrospection of a Broken-hearted

SMITH,

281
Belle,

404 There is that can Part Not. By
S.
Johs WATERS,

284
Saga of the Skeleton in Armor. By The Wrecker of Smithtown Bay.
H, W. LONGFELLOW,

52
By H. W. ROCKWELL,

313
Stanzas. By J. K. ARMSTRONG,
167 The Quadroone: a Novel,

339
Sketches of the Country, 193, 329, 364 The Seer, or Common Places Re-
Song: to Mary,
246 freshed,

341
St. John. By J. G. WHITTIER,
299 Things Theatrical,

346
Sunset on the Ocean,

312 Tabitha Bunker's Annoyances, 347
Song. By James G. Percival, 372, 449 The Cypress-Tree of Ceylon. By
T.
J. G. WHITTIER,

368
Three Hours at St. Cloud. By Hon.

The Jealousy of Liberty: A Revolu-
Lewis Cass,
1 tionary Incident,

373
The Egyptian Pyramids,

15 The Pilgrim's Walk. By John Wa-
The Norsemen. By J. G. WHITTIER, 16

TERS,

378
The Air-Spirit,
21 The Pirate's Song,

385
The Single Combat. By Hon. Judge

The Thunder Storm. By Mrs. M.
Hall, Ohio,

22
E. HEWITT,

403
The Marksmen of Maine,

29 The Guardian Angel: From LAMAR:
TINE,

414
The Spirit of Music. By J. McLel-

428
LAN, Jr., Esq.,

42 Taylor's Natural History of Society,
The Crayon Papers. By Washing The Poetry and History of Wyo-
TON IRVING,
55, 247 ming,

432

434
The Minstrel. By Fitz-GREENE The Editor's Drawer,
Halleck, Esq.,
59 The Dining-Out Man,

438

444
The American in London. By the The Catholic Expositor,
American in Paris,'
59 The American Reviews,

445

445
The Cave of Caroussis : A Narrative The National Academy of Design,
of Scio,
69 The Drama at Tinnecun,

450
The Fall of the Oak. By Geo. Hilų, The Latterlighis and their Progeny, 499
Esq.,
71 | The American at Home,

507
The Law of 'Spectres,

78

V.
The Patent Sermons of Dow Jr.,'
The American Eclectic,

84
Vagaries of Insanity. Dr. STEARN's
Essay,

266
The Gray Forest Eagle. By ALFRED

375
Vain Regrets. By Howard CHILTON,
B. STREET, Esq.,

99
Versailles. By an AMERICAN,

519
The Old Inn at Namptwich. By
JOHN WATERS,

101

W.
The Merrimack. By John G. WHIT Winter. By Mrs. E. C. STEDMAN, 152
TIER,

104 What they Think in England of War
The Country Doctor: an autobiog.

With Us,

443
raphy, 106, 181, 285, 389, 486
The Good Man's
Portrait. By Jas.

338
Lawson, Esq.,

118 Yankee Land. By G.F. Barstow,

82

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It was a glorious evening, toward the middle of September, when we ascended the hill whose summit is crowned by the Chateau of Saint Cloud. The sun was pouring its setting rays over the beautiful valley of the Seine, and as the whole region stretched before us to the east, the flood of light was sent back, exhibiting all the prominent objects in bold relief, as they are represented in the pictures of Claude Lorraine.

We stopped to gaze upon this landscape, no longer wondering that a residence which commanded such a prospect had long been a favorite habitation of Napoleon, as it now was of Louis Philippe. A broad fertile valley was before us, bounded in the distance by the elevated plateau through which the river has worn itself a passage, and where it winds from side to side, as if to adorn as well as to fertilize the domain it has conquered.

This father of the French rivers, however great his renown in Europe, would form but a feeble tributary to the magnificent streams which our country pours into the ocean. Nature has indeed spread out her works upon a more extensive scale in our favored regions, than in this older portion of the human heritage. Our lakes and rivers, plains, vallies, and forests, are impressed with a character of vastness, if I may coin an abstract term, which is itself one of the attributes of true sublimity, and which produces upon the traveller who visits them, emotions which no after events in life can efface. I never felt more profoundly the weakness of man and the power of God, than when seated in a frail birch canoe, with its ribs of cedar, and its covering of bark, descending the Mississippi in the night, and approaching the junction of this mighty river with the mightier Missouri.

These little Indian boats are admirably calculated for the manners of our aborigines, and of the Canadian voyageurs, their co-tenants of the western forests, and often their co-descendants from the same stock, and for the various lines of internal communication which nature has so bountifully provided for the trans-Alleghany regions. Driven by the paddle and by the wind, with great ease and velocity, light, and apparently fragile, they are managed with skill, and safety ride over the waves, which they seem hardly to touch; and when they

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VOL. XVII.

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