The Virgin and the Gipsy and Other Stories

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Wordsworth Editions, 2004 - 216 páginas
With an Introduction and Notes by Jeff Wallace, University of Glamorgan These stories of myth and resurrection, of uncanny events and violent impulse, were with one exception written and published in the latter half of the 1920s, coinciding with the composition of Lawrence's controversial masterpiece 'Lady Chatterley's Lover'. At this time Lawrence declared himself to be 'really awful sick of writing'; yet here we find some of his most beautiful, hauntingly melancholy fictions. In struggling to escape from their thwarted lives and to achieve human 'tenderness', the characters embody and continue the major preoccupations of Lawrence's work as a whole. 'Love Among the Haystacks' provides an early illustration of the intensity and innovation which made Lawrence one of the most distinctive and important of twentieth-century writers. AUTHOR: D(avid) H(erbert Richards) Lawrence (1885-1930) was an English novelist and poet, whose works were not only controversial during his lifetime, but long after his death. The explicit sexuality of his books, including his most popular work, 'Sons and Lovers', reached a peak with 'Lady Chatterley's Lover', his final book, that was not published in an unexpurgated form in the U.K. until after a court case for obscenity was dismissed, in 1960.

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Contenido

The Virgin and the Gipsy 3
3
Love Among the Haystacks
75
The Lovely Lady
109
Rawdons Roof
125
The Man Who Loved Islands
149
The Man Who Died
173
NOTES
213
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Acerca del autor (2004)

D(avid) H(erbert) Lawrence was born on September 11, 1885. His father was a coal miner and Lawrence grew up in a mining town in England. He always hated the mines, however, and frequently used them in his writing to represent both darkness and industrialism, which he despised because he felt it was scarring the English countryside. Lawrence attended high school and college in Nottingham and, after graduation, became a school teacher in Croyden in 1908. Although his first two novels had been unsuccessful, he turned to writing full time when a serious illness forced him to stop teaching. Lawrence spent much of his adult life abroad in Europe, particularly Italy, where he wrote some of his most significant and most controversial novels, including Sons and Lovers and Lady Chatterly's Lover. Lawrence and his wife, Frieda, who had left her first husband and her children to live with him, spent several years touring Europe and also lived in New Mexico for a time. Lawrence had been a frail child, and he suffered much of his life from tuberculosis. Eventually, he retired to a sanitorium in Nice, France. He died in France in 1930, at age 44. In his relatively short life, he produced more than 50 volumes of short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel journals, and letters, in addition to the novels for which he is best known.

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